• Quasar outflows have long been recognized as potential contributors to the co-evolution between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. The role of outflows in AGN feedback processes can be better understood by placing observational constraints on wind locations and kinetic energies. We utilize broad absorption line (BAL) variability to investigate the properties of a sample of 71 BAL quasars with P$\thinspace$V broad absorption. The presence of P$\thinspace$V BALs indicates that other BALs like C$\thinspace$IV are saturated, such that variability in those lines favours clouds crossing the line of sight. We use these constraints with measurements of BAL variability to estimate outflow locations and energetics. Our data set consists of multiple-epoch spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and MDM Observatory. We detect significant (4$\sigma$) BAL variations from 10 quasars in our sample over rest frame time-scales between < 0.2-3.8 yr. Our derived distances for the 10 variable outflows are nominally < 1-10 pc from the SMBH using the transverse-motion scenario, and < 100-1000 pc from the central source using ionization-change considerations. These distances, in combination with the estimated high outflow column densities (i.e. $N_{\textrm{H}}$ > 10$^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$), yield outflow kinetic luminosities between ~ 0.001-1 times the bolometric luminosity of the quasar, indicating that many absorber energies within our sample are viable for AGN feedback.
  • A large reverberation mapping study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 has yielded emission-line lags for Hbeta 4861 and He II 4686 and a central black hole mass measurement of about 10 million solar masses, consistent with previous measurements. A very low level of variability during the monitoring campaign precluded meeting our original goal of recovering velocity-delay maps from the data, but with the new Hbeta measurement, NGC 7469 is no longer an outlier in the relationship between the size of the Hbeta-emitting broad-line region and the AGN luminosity. It was necessary to detrend the continuum and Hbeta and He II 4686 line light curves and those from archival UV data for different time-series analysis methods to yield consistent results.
  • We combine the results of the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey and the Chandra XBootes Survey of the 8.5 square degrees Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey to produce the largest comparison of mid-IR and X-ray sources to date. The comparison is limited to sources with X-ray fluxes >8x10-15 erg cm-2s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV range and mid-IR sources with 3.6 um fluxes brighter than 18.4 mag (12.3 uJy). In this most sensitive IRAC band, 85% of the 3086 X-ray sources have mid-IR counterparts at an 80% confidence level based on a Bayesian matching technique. Only 2.5% of the sample have no IRAC counterpart at all based on visual inspection. Even for a smaller but a significantly deeper Chandra survey in the same field, the IRAC Shallow Survey recovers most of the X-ray sources. A majority (65%) of the Chandra sources detected in all four IRAC bands occupy a well-defined region of IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] vs [5.8] - [8.0] color-color space. These X-ray sources are likely infrared luminous, unobscured type I AGN with little mid-infrared flux contributed by the AGN host galaxy. Of the remaining Chandra sources, most are lower luminosity type I and type II AGN whose mid-IR emission is dominated by the host galaxy, while approximately 5% are either Galactic stars or very local galaxies.
  • In the last decade star clusters have been found in the centers of spiral galaxies across all Hubble types. We here present a spectroscopic study of the exceptionally bright (10^6 - 10^8 Lsun) but compact (Re ~ 5 pc) nuclear star clusters in very late type spirals with UVES at the VLT. We find the velocity dispersions of the nine clusters in our sample to range from 13 to 34 km/s. Using photometric data from the HST/WFPC2 and spherically symmetric dynamical models we determine masses between 8*10^5 and 6*10^7 Msun. The mass to light ratios range from 0.2 to 1.5 in the I band. This indicates a young mean age for most clusters, in agreement with previous studies. Given their high masses and small sizes we find that nuclear clusters are among the objects with the highest mean surface density known (up to 10^5 Msun pc^-2). From their dynamical properties we infer that, rather than small bulges, the closest structural kin of nuclear clusters appear to be massive compact star clusters. This includes such different objects as globular clusters, "super star clusters", ultra compact dwarf galaxies and the nuclei of dwarf elliptical galaxies. It is a challenge to explain why, despite the wildly different current environments, all different types of massive star clusters share very similar and structural properties. A possible explanation links UCDs and massive globular clusters to nuclear star clusters through stripping of nucleated dwarf galaxies in a merger event. The extreme properties of this type of clusters would then be a consequence of their location in the centers of their respective host galaxies.
  • We present ultraviolet spectra of the dwarf Seyfert 1 nucleus of NGC 4395, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at velocity resolutions of 7 to 15 km/sec. We confirm our earlier claim of C IV absorption in low-resolution UV spectra and detect a number of other absorption lines with lower ionization potentials. In addition to the Galactic lines, we identify two kinematic components of absorption that are likely to be intrinsic to NGC 4395. We consider possible origins of the absorption, including the interstellar medium (ISM) of NGC 4395, the narrow-line region (NLR), outflowing UV absorbers, and X-ray ``warm absorbers.'' Component 1, at a radial velocity of -770 km/sec with respect to the nucleus, is only identified in the C IV 1548.2 line. It most likely represents an outflowing UV absorber, similar to those seen in a majority of Seyfert 1 galaxies, although additional observations are needed to confirm the reality of this feature. Component 2, at -114 km/sec, most likely arises in the ISM of NGC 4395; its ionic column densities cannot be matched by photoionization models with a power-law continuum. Our models of the highly ionized X-ray absorbers claimed for this active galactic nucleus indicate that they would have undetectable C IV absorption, but large O VI and H I columns should be present. We attribute our lack of detection of the O VI and Ly-beta absorption from the X-ray absorbers to a combination of noise and dilution of the nuclear spectrum by hot stars in the large FUSE aperture.
  • We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note that this also appears to be the era of re-ionization of the universe. Finally, there is some evidence for a positive luminosity - metallicity relation in this high redshift quasar sample.
  • We report on the analysis of a large sample of 744 type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei, including quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies across the redshift range from 0 < z < 5 and spanning nearly 6 orders of magnitude in continuum luminosity. We discuss correlations of continuum and emission line properties in the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical spectral ranges. The well established Baldwin Effect is detected for almost all emission lines from OVI1034 to [OIII]5007. Their equivalent widths are significantly anti-correlated with the continuum strength, while they are nearly independent of redshift. This is the well known Baldwin Effect. Its slope beta, measured as log W_lambda ~ beta * log lambda * L_lambda (1450A), shows a tendency to become steeper towards higher luminosity. The slope of the Baldwin Effect also increases with the ionization energy needed to create the individual lines. In contrast to this general trend, the NV1240 equivalent width is nearly independent of continuum luminosity and remains nearly constant. The overall line behaviors are consistent with softer UV continuum shapes and perhaps increasing gas metallicity in more luminous Active Galactic Nuclei.
  • Motivated by the discovery of young, massive stars in the nuclei of some LINER/H II ``transition'' nuclei such as NGC 4569, we have computed photoionization models to determine whether some of these objects may be powered solely by young star clusters rather than by accretion-powered active nuclei. The models were calculated with the photoionization code CLOUDY, using evolving starburst continua generated by the the STARBURST99 code of Leitherer et al. (1999). We find that the models are able to reproduce the emission-line spectra of transition nuclei, but only for instantaneous bursts of solar or higher metallicity, and only for ages of ~3-5 Myr, the period when the extreme-ultraviolet continuum is dominated by emission from Wolf-Rayet stars. For clusters younger than 3 Myr or older than 6 Myr, and for models with a constant star-formation rate, the softer ionizing continuum results in an emission spectrum more typical of H II regions. This model predicts that Wolf-Rayet emission features should appear in the spectra of transition nuclei. While such features have not generally been detected to date, they could be revealed in observations having higher spatial resolution. Demographic arguments suggest that this starburst model may not apply to the majority of transition nuclei, particularly those in early-type host galaxies, but it could account for some members of the transition class in hosts of type Sa and later. The starburst models during the Wolf-Rayet-dominated phase can also reproduce the narrow-line spectra of some LINERs, but only under conditions of above-solar metallicity and only if high-density gas is present (n_e >~ 10^5 cm^{-3}). This scenario could be applicable to some ``Type 2'' LINERs which do not show any clear signs of nonstellar activity.