• Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) provide a compelling path forward to the large-format polarimeter, imaging, and spectrometer arrays needed for next-generation experiments in millimeter-wave cosmology and astronomy. We describe the development of feedhorn-coupled MKID detectors for the TolTEC millimeter-wave imaging polarimeter being constructed for the 50-meter Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). Observations with TolTEC are planned to begin in early 2019. TolTEC will comprise $\sim$7,000 polarization sensitive MKIDs and will represent the first MKID arrays fabricated and deployed on monolithic 150 mm diameter silicon wafers -- a critical step towards future large-scale experiments with over $10^5$ detectors. TolTEC will operate in observational bands at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.0 mm and will use dichroic filters to define a physically independent focal plane for each passband, thus allowing the polarimeters to use simple, direct-absorption inductive structures that are impedance matched to incident radiation. This work is part of a larger program at NIST-Boulder to develop MKID-based detector technologies for use over a wide range of photon energies spanning millimeter-waves to X-rays. We present the detailed pixel layout and describe the methods, tools, and flexible design parameters that allow this solution to be optimized for use anywhere in the millimeter and sub-millimeter bands. We also present measurements of prototype devices operating in the 1.1 mm band and compare the observed optical performance to that predicted from models and simulations.
  • We present the results of the first, deep ALMA imaging covering the full 4.5 sq arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) as previously imaged with WFC3/IR on HST. Using a mosaic of 45 pointings, we have obtained a homogeneous 1.3mm image of the HUDF, achieving an rms sensitivity of 35 microJy, at a resolution of 0.7 arcsec. From an initial list of ~50 >3.5sigma peaks, a rigorous analysis confirms 16 sources with flux densities S(1.3) > 120 microJy. All of these have secure galaxy counterparts with robust redshifts (<z> = 2.15), and 12 are also detected at 6GHz in new deep JVLA imaging. Due to the wealth of supporting data in this unique field, the physical properties of the ALMA sources are well constrained, including their stellar masses (M*) and UV+FIR star-formation rates (SFR). Our results show that stellar mass is the best predictor of SFR in the high-z Universe; indeed at z > 2 our ALMA sample contains 7 of the 9 galaxies in the HUDF with M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun and we detect only one galaxy at z > 3.5, reflecting the rapid drop-off of high-mass galaxies with increasing redshift. The detections, coupled with stacking, allow us to probe the redshift/mass distribution of the 1.3-mm background down to S(1.3) ~ 10 micro-Jy. We find strong evidence for a steep `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2, with SFR \propto M* and a mean specific SFR = 2.2 /Gyr. Moreover, we find that ~85% of total star formation at z ~ 2 is enshrouded in dust, with ~65% of all star formation at this epoch occurring in high-mass galaxies (M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun), for which the average obscured:unobscured SF ratio is ~200. Finally, we combine our new ALMA results with the existing HST data to revisit the cosmic evolution of star-formation rate density; we find that this peaks at z ~ 2.5, and that the star-forming Universe transits from primarily unobscured to primarily obscured thereafter at z ~ 4.
  • We present the software system used to control and operate the South Pole Telescope. The South Pole Telescope is a 10-meter millimeter-wavelength telescope designed to measure anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at arcminute angular resolution. In the austral summer of 2011/12, the SPT was equipped with a new polarization-sensitive camera, which consists of 1536 transition-edge sensor bolometers. The bolometers are read out using 36 independent digital frequency multiplexing (\dfmux) readout boards, each with its own embedded processors. These autonomous boards control and read out data from the focal plane with on-board software and firmware. An overall control software system running on a separate control computer controls the \dfmux boards, the cryostat and all other aspects of telescope operation. This control software collects and monitors data in real-time, and stores the data to disk for transfer to the United States for analysis.
  • In January 2012, the 10m South Pole Telescope (SPT) was equipped with a polarization-sensitive camera, SPTpol, in order to measure the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the polarization of the CMB at small angular scales (~several arcminutes) can detect the gravitational lensing of the CMB by large scale structure and constrain the sum of the neutrino masses. At large angular scales (~few degrees) CMB measurements can constrain the energy scale of Inflation. SPTpol is a two-color mm-wave camera that consists of 180 polarimeters at 90 GHz and 588 polarimeters at 150 GHz, with each polarimeter consisting of a dual transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. The full complement of 150 GHz detectors consists of 7 arrays of 84 ortho-mode transducers (OMTs) that are stripline coupled to two TES detectors per OMT, developed by the TRUCE collaboration and fabricated at NIST. Each 90 GHz pixel consists of two antenna-coupled absorbers coupled to two TES detectors, developed with Argonne National Labs. The 1536 total detectors are read out with digital frequency-domain multiplexing (DfMUX). The SPTpol deployment represents the first on-sky tests of both of these detector technologies, and is one of the first deployed instruments using DfMUX readout technology. We present the details of the design, commissioning, deployment, on-sky optical characterization and detector performance of the complete SPTpol focal plane.
  • The source counts of galaxies discovered at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths provide important information on the evolution of infrared-bright galaxies. We combine the data from six blank-field surveys carried out at 1.1 mm with AzTEC, totalling 1.6 square degrees in area with root-mean-square depths ranging from 0.4 to 1.7 mJy, and derive the strongest constraints to date on the 1.1 mm source counts at flux densities S(1100) = 1-12 mJy. Using additional data from the AzTEC Cluster Environment Survey to extend the counts to S(1100) ~ 20 mJy, we see tentative evidence for an enhancement relative to the exponential drop in the counts at S(1100) ~ 13 mJy and a smooth connection to the bright source counts at >20 mJy measured by the South Pole Telescope; this excess may be due to strong lensing effects. We compare these counts to predictions from several semi-analytical and phenomenological models and find that for most the agreement is quite good at flux densities > 4 mJy; however, we find significant discrepancies (>3sigma) between the models and the observed 1.1 mm counts at lower flux densities, and none of them are consistent with the observed turnover in the Euclidean-normalised counts at S(1100) < 2 mJy. Our new results therefore may require modifications to existing evolutionary models for low luminosity galaxies. Alternatively, the discrepancy between the measured counts at the faint end and predictions from phenomenological models could arise from limited knowledge of the spectral energy distributions of faint galaxies in the local Universe.
  • We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed a 6.34 deg$^2$ centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 micronm emission and the $^{12}$CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkHalpha262 and LkHalpha264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkHalpha262 is likely to be Class II (pre-main-sequence star), but there are also indications that it could be a late Class I (protostar). A flared disk and a bipolar cavity in the models of Class I sources lead to more complicated SEDs. From the present AzTEC observations of the MBM12 region, it appears that other sources detected with AzTEC are likely to be extragalactic and located behind MBM12. Some of these have radio counterparts and their star formation rates are derived from a fit of the SEDs to the photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included.
  • We present new, wide and deep images in the 1.1 mm continuum and the $^{12}$CO ($J$=1-0) emission toward the northern part of the Orion A Giant Molecular Cloud (Orion-A GMC). The 1.1 mm data were taken with the AzTEC camera mounted on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope in Chile, and the $^{12}$CO ($J$=1-0) data were with the 25 beam receiver (BEARS) on the NRO 45 m telescope in the On-The-Fly (OTF) mode. The present AzTEC observations are the widest $(\timeform{1.D7}$ $\times$ $\timeform{2.D3}$, corresponding to 12 pc $\times$ 17 pc) and the highest-sensitivity ($\sim$9 mJy beam$^{-1}$) 1.1 mm dust-continuum imaging of the Orion-A GMC with an effective spatial resolution of $\sim$ 40$\arcsec$. The $^{12}$CO ($J$=1-0) image was taken over the northern $\timeform{1D.2} \times\timeform{1D.2}$ (corresponding 9 pc $\times$ 9 pc) area with a sensitivity of 0.93 K in $T_{\rm MB}$, a velocity resolution of 1.0 km s$^{-1}$, and an effective spatial resolution of 21$\arcsec$. With these data, together with the MSX 8 $\mu$m, Spitzer 24 $\mu$m and the 2MASS data, we have investigated the detailed structure and kinematics of molecular gas associated with the Orion-A GMC and have found evidence for interactions between molecular clouds and the external forces that may trigger star formation. Two types of possible triggers were revealed; 1) Collision of the diffuse gas on the cloud surface, particularly at the eastern side of the OMC-2/3 region, and 2) Irradiation of UV on the pre-existing filaments and dense molecular cloud cores. Our wide-field and high-sensitivity imaging have provided the first comprehensive view of the potential sites of triggered star formation in the Orion-A GMC.
  • We present the first results from the largest deep extragalactic millimetre-wavelength survey undertaken to date. These results are derived from maps covering over 0.7 deg^2, made at 1.1mm, using the AzTEC continuum camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The maps were made in the two fields originally targeted at 0.85mm with SCUBA in the SHADES project, namely the Lockman Hole East (mapped to a depth of 0.9-1.3 mJy rms) and the Subaru XMM Deep Field (1.0-1.7 mJy rms). The wealth of existing and forthcoming deep multi-frequency data in these two fields will allow the bright mm source population revealed by these images to be explored in detail in subsequent papers. Here we present the maps themselves, a catalogue of 114 high-significance sub-millimetre galaxy detections, and a thorough statistical analysis leading to the most robust determination to date of the 1.1mm source number counts. Through careful comparison, we find that both the COSMOS and GOODS North fields, also imaged with AzTEC, contain an excess of mm sources over the new 1.1mm source-count baseline established here. In particular, our new AzTEC/SHADES results indicate that very luminous high-redshift dust enshrouded starbursts (S_{1.1} > 3 mJy) are 25-50% less common than would have been inferred from these smaller surveys, thus highlighting the potential roles of cosmic variance and clustering in such measurements. We compare number count predictions from recent models of the evolving mm/sub-mm source population to these SMG surveys, which provide important constraints for the ongoing refinement of semi-analytic and hydrodynamical models of galaxy formation, and find that all recent models over-predict the number of bright sub-millimetre galaxies found in this survey.
  • We report an over-density of bright sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) in the 0.15 sq. deg. AzTEC/COSMOS survey and a spatial correlation between the SMGs and the optical-IR galaxy density at z <~ 1.1. This portion of the COSMOS field shows a ~ 3-sigma over-density of robust SMG detections when compared to a background, or "blankfield", population model that is consistent with SMG surveys of fields with no extragalactic bias. The SMG over-density is most significant in the number of very bright detections (14 sources with measured fluxes S(1.1mm) > 6 mJy), which is entirely incompatible with sample variance within our adopted blank-field number densities and infers an over-density significance of >> 4. We find that the over-density and spatial correlation to optical-IR galaxy density are most consistent with lensing of a background SMG population by foreground mass structures along the line of sight, rather than physical association of the SMGs with the z <~ 1.1 galaxies/clusters. The SMG positions are only weakly correlated with weak-lensing maps, suggesting that the dominant sources of correlation are individual galaxies and the more tenuous structures in the region and not the massive and compact clusters. These results highlight the important roles cosmic variance and large-scale structure can play in the study of SMGs.
  • We have conducted a deep and uniform 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field with AzTEC on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Here we present the first results from this survey including maps, the source catalogue, and 1.1 mm number-counts. The results presented here were obtained from a 245 sq-arcmin region with near uniform coverage to a depth of 0.96-1.16 mJy/beam. Our robust catalogue contains 28 source candidates detected with S/N >= 3.75, only 1-2 of which are expected to be spurious detections. Of these source candidates, 8 are also detected by SCUBA at 850 um in regions where there is good overlap between the two surveys. The major advantage of our survey over that with SCUBA is the uniformity of coverage. We calculate number counts using two different techniques: the first using a frequentist parameter estimation, and the second using a Bayesian method. The two sets of results are in good agreement. We find that the 1.1 mm differential number counts are well described in the 2-6 mJy range by the functional form dN/dS = N' (S'/S) exp(-S/S') with fitted parameters S' = 1.25 +/-0.38 mJy and dN/dS = 300 +/- 90 per mJy per sq-deg at 3 mJy.