• $\theta$ Cygni is an F3 spectral-type main-sequence star with visual magnitude V=4.48. This star was the brightest star observed by the original Kepler spacecraft mission. Short-cadence (58.8 s) photometric data using a custom aperture were obtained during Quarter 6 (June-September 2010) and subsequently in Quarters 8 and 12-17. We present analyses of the solar-like oscillations based on Q6 and Q8 data, identifying angular degree $l$ = 0, 1, and 2 oscillations in the range 1000-2700 microHz, with a large frequency separation of 83.9 plus/minus 0.4 microHz, and frequency with maximum amplitude 1829 plus/minus 54 microHz. We also present analyses of new ground-based spectroscopic observations, which, when combined with angular diameter measurements from interferometry and Hipparcos parallax, give T_eff = 6697 plus/minus 78 K, radius 1.49 plus/minus 0.03 solar radii, [Fe/H] = -0.02 plus/minus 0.06 dex, and log g = 4.23 plus/minus 0.03. We calculate stellar models matching the constraints using several methods, including using the Yale Rotating Evolution Code and the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal. The best-fit models have masses 1.35-1.39 solar masses and ages 1.0-1.6 Gyr. theta Cyg's T_eff and log g place it cooler than the red edge of the gamma Doradus instability region established from pre-Kepler ground-based observations, but just at the red edge derived from pulsation modeling. The pulsation models show gamma Dor gravity-mode pulsations driven by the convective-blocking mechanism, with frequencies of 1 to 3 cycles/day (11 to 33 microHz). However, gravity modes were not detected in the Kepler data, one signal at 1.776 cycles/day (20.56 microHz) may be attributable to a faint, possibly background, binary. Asteroseismic studies of theta Cyg and other A-F stars observed by Kepler and CoRoT, will help to improve stellar model physics and to test pulsation driving mechanisms.
  • MOST time-series photometry of mu Eri, an SB1 eclipsing binary with a rapidly-rotating SPB primary, is reported and analyzed. The analysis yields a number of sinusoidal terms, mainly due to the intrinsic variation of the primary, and the eclipse light-curve. New radial-velocity observations are presented and used to compute parameters of a spectroscopic orbit. Frequency analysis of the radial-velocity residuals from the spectroscopic orbital solution fails to uncover periodic variations with amplitudes greater than 2 km/s. A Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly is detected from observations covering ingress. From archival photometric indices and the revised Hipparcos parallax we derive the primary's effective temperature, surface gravity, bolometric correction, and the luminosity. An analysis of a high signal-to-noise spectrogram yields the effective temperature and surface gravity in good agreement with the photometric values. From the same spectrogram, we determine the abundance of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, and Fe. The eclipse light-curve is solved by means of EBOP. For a range of mass of the primary, a value of mean density, very nearly independent of assumed mass, is computed from the parameters of the system. Contrary to a recent report, this value is approximately equal to the mean density obtained from the star's effective temperature and luminosity. Despite limited frequency resolution of the MOST data, we were able to recover the closely-spaced SPB frequency quadruplet discovered from the ground in 2002-2004. The other two SPB terms seen from the ground were also recovered. Moreover, our analysis of the MOST data adds 15 low-amplitude SPB terms with frequencies ranging from 0.109 c/d to 2.786 c/d.
  • The V=4.48 F4 main-sequence star theta Cyg is the brightest star observable in the Kepler spacecraft field-of-view. Short-cadence (58.8 s) photometric data were obtained by Kepler during 2010 June-September. Preliminary analysis shows solar-like oscillations in the frequency range 1200- 2500 microHz. To interpret these data and to motivate further observations, we use observational constraints from the literature to construct stellar evolution and pulsation models for this star. We compare the observed large frequency separation of the solar-like oscillations with the model predictions, and discuss the prospects for gamma Doradus-like g-mode pulsations, given the observational constraints. We discuss the value of angular diameter measurements from optical interferometry for constraining stellar properties and the implications for asteroseismology.
  • We report the discovery and analysis of a very strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating early B-type star HR 5907, based on observations obtained as part of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project. We infer a rotation period of 0.508276 +0.000015/-0.000012 d from photometric and H{\alpha} EW measurements, making this the shortest period, non-degenerate, magnetic massive star known to date. From the comparison of IUE UV and optical spectroscopy with LTE BRUCE/KYLIE models we find a solid-angle integrated, uniform black-body temperature of 17 000 \pm 1000 K, a projected rotational velocity of 290 \pm 10 km/s, an equatorial radius of 3.1 \pm 0.2 R_sun, a stellar mass of 5.5 \pm 0.5 M_sun, and an inclination angle of the rotation axis to our line-of-sight of 70 \pm 10\circ. Our measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field, which vary between -500 and -2000 G, phase coherently with the rotation period and imply a surface dipole field strength of \sim15.7 kG. On the other hand, from fits to mean Least-Squares Deconvolved Stokes V line profiles we infer a dipole field strength of \sim10.4 kG. This disagreement may result from a magnetic configuration more complex than our model, and/or from the non-uniform helium surface abundance distribution. In either case we obtain a magnetic obliquity nearly aligned with the rotation axis ({\beta} = 7+2/-1\circ). Our optical spectroscopy also shows weak variability in carbon, silicon and nitrogen lines. The emission variability in hydrogen Balmer and Paschen lines indicates the presence of a dense, highly structured magnetosphere, interpreted as a centrifugally supported, magnetically confined circumstellar disk.
  • We report on the analysis of high-precision space-based photometry of the roAp (rapidly oscillating Ap) stars HD 9289, HD 99563, and HD134214. All three stars were observed by the MOST satellite for more than 25 days, allowing unprecedented views of their pulsation. We find previously unknown candidate frequencies in all three stars. We establish the rotation period of HD 9289 (8.5 d) for the first time and show that the star is pulsating in two modes that show different mode geometries. We present a detailed analysis of HD 99563's mode multiplet and find a new candidate frequency which appears independent of the previously known mode. Finally, we report on 11 detected pulsation frequencies in HD 134214, 9 of which were never before detected in photometry, and 3 of which are completely new detections. Thanks to the unprecedentedly small frequency uncertainties, the p-mode spectrum of HD 134214 can be seen to have a well-defined large frequency spacing similar to the well-studied roAp star HD 24712 (HR 1217).
  • Ten days of commissioning data (Quarter 0) and thirty-three days of science data (Quarter 1) yield instrumental flux timeseries of ~150,000 stars that were combed for transit events, termed Threshold Crossing Events (TCE), each having a total detection statistic above 7.1-sigma. TCE light curves are modeled as star+planet systems. Those returning a companion radius smaller than 2R_J are assigned a KOI (Kepler Object of Interest) number. The raw flux, pixel flux, and flux-weighted centroids of every KOI are scrutinized to assess the likelihood of being an astrophysical false-positive versus the likelihood of a being a planetary companion. This vetting using Kepler data is referred to as data validation. Herein, we describe the data validation metrics and graphics used to identify viable planet candidates amongst the KOIs. Light curve modeling tests for a) the difference in depth of the odd- versus even-numbered transits, b) evidence of ellipsoidal variations, and c) evidence of a secondary eclipse event at phase=0.5. Flux-weighted centroids are used to test for signals correlated with transit events with a magnitude and direction indicative of a background eclipsing binary. Centroid timeseries are complimented by analysis of images taken in-transit versus out-of-transit, the difference often revealing the pixel contributing the most to the flux change during transit. Examples are shown to illustrate each test. Candidates passing data validation are submitted to ground-based observers for further false-positive elimination or confirmation/characterization.
  • Context: Asteroseismology has great potential for the study of metal-poor stars due to its sensitivity to determine stellar ages. Aims: Our goal was to detect p-mode oscillations in the metal-poor sub-dwarf 85 Peg A and to search for other variability on longer timescales. Methods: We have obtained continuous high-precision photometry of the binary system 85 Pegasi with the MOST space telescope in two seasons (2005 & 2007). Furthermore, we redetermined vsini for 85 Peg A using high resolution spectra obtained through the ESO archive, and used photometric spot modeling to interpret long periodic variations. Results: Our frequency analysis yields no convincing evidence for p-modes significantly above a noise level of 4 ppm. Using simulated p-mode patterns we provide upper RMS amplitude limits for 85 Peg A. The light curve shows evidence for variability with a period of about 11 d and this periodicity is also seen in the follow up run in 2007; however, as different methods to remove instrumental trends in the 2005 run yield vastly different results, the exact shape and periodicity of the 2005 variability remain uncertain. Our re-determined vsini value for 85 Peg A is comparable to previous studies and we provide realistic uncertainties for this parameter. Using these values in combination with simple photometric spot models we are able to reconstruct the observed variations. Conclusions: The null-detection of p-modes in 85 Peg A is consistent with theoretical values for pulsation amplitudes in this star. The detected long-periodic variation must await confirmation by further observations with similar or better precision and long-term stability. If the 11 d periodicity is real, rotational modulation of surface features on one of the components is the most likely explanation.
  • A field star, HD 61199 (V ~ 8), simultaneously observed with Procyon by the MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite in continuous runs of 34, 17, and 34 days in 2004, 2005, and 2007, was found to pulsate in 11 frequencies in the delta Scuti range with amplitudes from 1.7 down to 0.09 mmag. The photometry also showed variations with a period of about four days. To investigate the nature of the longer period, 45 days of time-resolved spectroscopy was obtained at the Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg in 2004. The radial velocity measurements indicate that HD 61199 is a triple system. A delta Scuti pulsator with a rich eigenspectrum in a multiple system is promising for asteroseismology. Our objectives were to identify which of the stars in the system is the delta Scuti variable and to obtain the orbital elements of the system and the fundamental parameters of the individual components, which are constrained by the pulsation frequencies of the delta Scuti star. Classical Fourier techniques and least-squares multi-sinusoidal fits were applied to the MOST photometry to identify the pulsation frequencies. The groundbased spectroscopy was analysed with least-squares-deconvolution (LSD) techniques, and the orbital elements derived with the KOREL and ORBITX routines. Asteroseismic models were also generated. The photometric and spectroscopic data are compatible with a triple system consisting of a close binary with an orbital period of 3.57 days and a delta Scuti companion (HD 61199,A) as the most luminous component. The delta Scuti star is a rapid rotator with about vsin i = 130 km/s and an upper mass limit of about 2.1 Msun. For the close binary components, we find they are of nearly equal mass, with lower mass limits of about 0.7 Msun.
  • Context: We present 31.2 days of nearly continuous MOST photometry of the roAp star 10Aql. Aims:The goal was to provide an unambiguous frequency identification for this little studied star, as well as to discuss the detected frequencies in the context of magnetic models and analyze the influence of the magnetic field on the pulsation. Methods: Using traditional Fourier analysis techniques on three independent data reductions, intrinsic frequencies for the star are identified. Theoretical non-adiabatic axisymmetric modes influenced by a magnetic field having polar field strengths Bp = 0-5kG were computed to compare the observations to theory. Results: The high-precision data allow us to identify three definite intrinsic pulsation frequencies and two other candidate frequencies with low S/N. Considering the observed spacings, only one (50.95microHz) is consistent with the main sequence nature of roAp stars. The comparison with theoretical models yields a best fit for a 1.95Msun model having solar metallicity, suppressed envelope convection, and homogenous helium abundance. Furthermore, our analysis confirms the suspected slow rotation of the star and sets new lower limits to the rotation period (Prot>1 month) and inclination (i>30\pm10deg.). Conclusions:The observed frequency spectrum is not rich enough to unambiguously identify a model. On the other hand, the models hardly represent roAp stars in detail due to the approximations needed to describe the interactions of the magnetic field with stellar structure and pulsation. Consequently, errors in the model frequencies needed for the fitting procedure can only be estimated. Nevertheless, it is encouraging that models which suppress convection and include solar metallicity, in agreement with current concepts of roAp stars, fit the observations best.
  • We have measured transit times for HD 189733b passing in front of its bright (V = 7.67) chromospherically active and spotted parent star. Nearly continuous broadband optical photometry of this system was obtained with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) space telescope during 21 days in August 2006, monitoring 10 consecutive transits. We have used these data to search for deviations from a constant orbital period which can indicate the presence of additional planets in the system that are as yet undetected by Doppler searches. There are no transit timing variations above the level of ${\pm}45$ s, ruling out super-Earths (of masses $1 - 4 M_{\earth}$) in the 1:2 and 2:3 inner resonances and planets of 20 $M_{\earth}$ in the 2:1 outer resonance of the known planet. We also discuss complications in measuring transit times for a planet that transits an active star with large star spots, and how the transits can help constrain and test spot models. This has implications for the large number of such systems expected to be discovered by the CoRoT and Kepler missions.
  • We report on the measurement of transit times for the HD 209458 planetary system from photometry obtained with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) space telescope. Deviations from a constant orbital period can indicate the presence of additional planets in the system that are yet undetected, potentially with masses approaching an Earth mass. The MOST data sets of HD 209458 from 2004 and 2005 represent unprecedented time coverage with nearly continuous observations spanning 14 and 43 days and monitoring 3 transits and 12 consecutive transits, respectively. The transit times we obtain show no variations on three scales: (a) no long-term change in P since before 2004 at the 25 ms level, (b) no trend in transit timings during the 2005 run, and (c) no individual transit timing deviations above 80 sec level. Together with previously published transit times from Agol & Steffen (2007), this allows us to place limits on the presence of additional close-in planets in the system, in some cases down to below an Earth mass. This result, along with previous radial velocity work, now eliminates the possibility that a perturbing planet could be responsible for the additional heat source needed to explain HD 209458b's anomalous low density.
  • Using MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) satellite guide star photometry, we have discovered a metallic A star showing hybrid p- and g-mode pulsations. HD 114839 was observed nearly continuously for 10 days in March, 2005. We identify frequencies in three groups: the first centered near 2 cycles/day, in the gamma Dor pulsation range, and two others near 8 and 20, both in the delta Scuti range. This is only the fourth known such hybrid pulsator, including another MOST discovery (Rowe et al. 2006, this issue).
  • We present 10.27$ \rm{hrs}$ of photometry of the roAp star HD 134214 obtained by the MOST satellite. The star is shown to be monoperiodic and oscillating at a frequency of 2948.97$ \pm 0.55 \mu\rm{Hz}$. This is consistent with earlier ground based photometric campaigns (e.g. Kreidl et al. 1994). We do not detect any of the additional frequencies identified in the recent spectroscopic study by Kurtz et al. (2006) down to an amplitude limit of 0.36$ \rm{mmag}$ ($2\sigma$ significance limit).
  • We present a total of 57 days of contiguous, high-cadence photometry (14 days in 2004 and 43 in 2005) of the star BD+18 4914 obtained with the MOST satellite. We detect 16 frequencies down to a signal-to-noise of 3.6 (amplitude \~ 0.5 mmag). Six of these are less than 3 cycles/day, and the other ten are between 7 and 16 cycles/day. We intrepret the low frequencies as g-mode $\gamma$ Doradus-type pulsations and the others as $\delta$ Scuti-type p-modes, making BD+18 4914 one of the few known hybrid pulsators of its class. If the g-mode pulsations are high-overtone non-radial modes with identical low degree l, we can assign a unique mode classification of n={12, 20, 21, 22, 31, 38} based on the frequency ratio method.
  • The Microvariability and Oscillations of stars (MOST) satellite has detected low-amplitude light variations ($\Delta m\sim$1 mmag) in the Be star $\beta$ CMi (B8Ve). The observations lasted 41 days and the variations have typical periods $\sim 0.3$ days. We demonstrate that the dominant frequencies are consistent with prograde high-order g-modes of $m=-1$ excited by the Fe-bump of opacity in an intermediate-mass ($\approx 3.5 M_\odot$) star with a nearly critical rotation period of 0.38 days. This is the first detection of nonradial g-mode pulsations in a Be star later than B6 leading to the possibility that pulsations are excited in all classical Be stars.
  • We present space-based photometry of the transiting exoplanetary system HD 209458 obtained with the MOST (Microvariablity and Oscillations of STars) satellite, spanning 14 days and covering 4 transits and 4 secondary eclipses. The HD 209458 photometry was obtained in MOST's lower-precision Direct Imaging mode, which is used for targets in the brightness range $6.5 < V < 13$. We describe the photometric reduction techniques for this mode of observing, in particular the corrections for stray Earthshine. We do not detect the secondary eclipse in the MOST data, to a limit in depth of 0.053 mmag (1 \sigma). We set a 1 \sigma upper limit on the planet-star flux ratio of 4.88 x 10^-5 corresponding to a geometric albedo upper limit in the MOST bandpass (400 to 700 nm) of 0.25. The corresponding numbers at the 3 \sigma level are 1.34 x 10^-4 and 0.68 respectively. HD 209458b is half as bright as Jupiter in the MOST bandpass. This low geometric albedo value is an important constraint for theoretical models of the HD209458b atmosphere, in particular ruling out the presence of reflective clouds. A second MOST campaign on HD 209458 is expected to be sensitive to an exoplanet albedo as low as 0.13 (1 sigma), if the star does not become more intrinsically variable in the meantime.