• Nuclear stellar cusps are defined as central excess light component in the stellar light profiles of galaxies and are suggested to be stellar relics of intense compact starbursts in the central ~100-500 pc region of gas-rich major mergers. Here we probe the build-up of nuclear cusps during the actual starburst phase for a complete sample of Luminous Infrared Galaxy systems (85 LIRGs, with 11.4<log[LIR/L_sun]<12.5) in the GOALS sample. Cusp properties are derived via 2-dimensional fitting of the nuclear stellar light imaged in the near-infrared by the Hubble Space Telescope and have been combined with mid-IR diagnostics for AGN/starburst characterization. We find that nuclear stellar cusps are resolved in 76% of LIRGs (merger and non-interacting galaxies). The cusp strength and luminosity increases with far-IR luminosity (excluding AGN) and merger stage, confirming theoretical models that starburst activity is associated with the build-up of nuclear stellar cusps. Evidence for ultra compact nuclear starbursts is found in ~13% of LIRGs, which have a strong unresolved central NIR light component but no significant contribution of an AGN. The nuclear near-IR surface density (measured within 1 kpc radius) increases by a factor of ~5 towards late merger stages. A careful comparison to local early-type galaxies with comparable masses reveals (a) that local (U)LIRGs have a significantly larger cusp fraction and (b) that the majority of the cusp LIRGs have host galaxy luminosities (H-band) similar to core ellipticals which is roughly one order in magnitude larger than for cusp ellipticals.
  • Analysis of data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the double nucleus ULIRG Mrk 273 reveals an absorbed hard X-ray source coincident with the southwest nucleus, implying that this unresolved near infrared source is where an active nucleus resides while the northern nuclear region contains a powerful starburst which dominates the far infrared luminosity. There is evidence of a slight image extension in the 6-7 keV band, where a Fe K line is present, towards the northern nucleus. A large-scale, diffuse emission nebula detected in soft X-rays contains a dark lane that spatially coincides with a high surface-brightness tidal tail extending ~50 arcsec (40 kpc) to the south. The soft X-ray source is likely located behind the tidal tail which absorbs X-ray photons along the line of sight. The estimated column density of cold gas in the tidal tail responsible for shadowing the soft X-rays is nH >= 6e+21 cm-2, consistent with the tidal tail having an edge-on orientation.
  • We present results of Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS H-band imaging of 73 of most luminous (i.e., log[L_IR/L_0]>11.4) Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). This dataset combines multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) and ground-based telescopes. In this paper we use the high-resolution near-infrared data to recover nuclear structure that is obscured by dust at optical wavelengths and measure the evolution in this structure along the merger sequence. A large fraction of all galaxies in our sample possess double nuclei (~63%) or show evidence for triple nuclei (~6%). Half of these double nuclei are not visible in the HST B-band images due to dust obscuration. The majority of interacting LIRGs have remaining merger timescales of 0.3 to 1.3 Gyrs, based on the projected nuclear separations and the mass ratio of nuclei. We find that the bulge luminosity surface density increases significantly along the merger sequence (primarily due to a decrease of the bulge radius), while the bulge luminosity shows a small increase towards late merger stages. No significant increase of the bulge Sersic index is found. LIRGs that show no interaction features have on average a significantly larger bulge luminosity, suggesting that non merging LIRGs have larger bulge masses than merging LIRGs. This may be related to the flux limited nature of the sample and the fact that mergers can significantly boost the IR luminosity of otherwise low luminosity galaxies. We find that the projected nuclear separation is significantly smaller for ULIRGs (median value of 1.2 kpc) than for LIRGs (mean value of 6.7 kpc), suggesting that the LIRG phase appears earlier in mergers than the ULIRG phase.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • (abridged) We present a study on the effects of the intracluster medium (ICM) on the interstellar medium (ISM) of 10 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies using {\it Spitzer} far-infrared (FIR) and VLA radio continuum imaging. Relying on the FIR-radio correlation within normal galaxies, we use our infrared data to create model radio maps which we compare to the observed radio images. For 6 of our sample galaxies we find regions along their outer edges that are highly deficient in the radio compared with our models. We believe these observations are the signatures of ICM ram pressure. For NGC 4522 we find the radio deficit region to lie just exterior to a region of high radio polarization and flat radio spectral index, although the total 20 cm radio continuum in this region does not appear strongly enhanced. These characteristics seem consistent for other galaxies with radio polarization data in the literature. The strength of the radio deficit is inversely correlated with the time since peak pressure as inferred from stellar population studies and gas stripping simulations, suggesting the strength of the radio deficit is good indicator of the strength of the current ram pressure. We also find that galaxies having {\it local} radio {\it deficits} appear to have {\it enhanced global} radio fluxes. Our preferred physical picture is that the observed radio deficit regions arise from the ICM wind sweeping away cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and the associated magnetic field, thereby creating synchrotron tails as observed for some of our galaxies. We propose that CR particles are also re-accelerated by ICM-driven shocklets behind the observed radio deficit regions which in turn enhances the remaining radio disk brightness.
  • We present a study on the effects of the intracluster medium (ICM) on the interstellar medium (ISM) of 10 Virgo cluster galaxies using {\it Spitzer} far-infrared (FIR) and VLA radio continuum imaging. Relying on the FIR-radio correlation {\it within} normal galaxies, we use our infrared data to create model radio maps which we compare to the observed radio images. For 6 of our sample galaxies we find regions along their outer edges that are highly deficient in the radio compared with our models. We believe these observations are the signatures of ICM ram pressure. For NGC 4522 we find the radio deficit region to lie just exterior to a region of high radio polarization and flat radio spectral index, however the total radio continuum in this region does not appear significantly enhanced. This scenario seems consistent for other galaxies with radio polarization data in the literature. We also find that galaxies having local radio deficits appear to have enhanced global radio fluxes. Our preferred physical picture is that the observed radio deficit regions arise from the ICM wind sweeping away cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and the associated magnetic field, thereby creating synchrotron tails observed for some of our galaxies. CR particles are also re-accelerated by ICM-driven shocklets behind the observed radio deficit regions which in turn enhances the remaining radio disk brightness. The high radio polarization and lack of coincidental signatures in the total synchrotron power in these regions arises from shear, and possibly mild compression, as the ICM wind drags and stretches the magnetic field.