• We present multi-wavelength detections of nine candidate gravitationally-lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected at 218GHz (1.4mm) from the ACT equatorial survey. Among the brightest ACT sources, these represent the subset of the total ACT sample lying in Herschel SPIRE fields, and all nine of the 218GHz detections were found to have bright Herschel counterparts. By fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with a modified blackbody model with power-law temperature distribution, we find the sample has a median redshift of $z=4.1^{+1.1}_{-1.0}$ (68 per cent confidence interval), as expected for 218GHz selection, and an apparent total infrared luminosity of $\log_{10}(\mu L_{\rm IR}/{\rm L}_\odot) = 13.86^{+0.33}_{-0.30}$, which suggests that they are either strongly lensed sources or unresolved collections of unlensed DSFGs. The effective apparent diameter of the sample is $\sqrt{\mu}d= 4.2^{+1.7}_{-1.0}$kpc, further evidence of strong lensing or multiplicity, since the typical diameter of dusty star-forming galaxies is $1.0$--$2.5$ kpc. We emphasize that the effective apparent diameter derives from SED modelling without the assumption of optically thin dust (as opposed to image morphology). We find that the sources have substantial optical depth ($\tau = 4.2^{+3.7}_{-1.9}$) to dust around the peak in the modified blackbody spectrum ($\lambda_{\rm obs} \le 500$ $\mu$m), a result that is robust to model choice.
  • The Hydrogen Intensity and Real-time Analysis eXperiment (HIRAX) is a new 400-800MHz radio interferometer under development for deployment in South Africa. HIRAX will comprise 1024 six meter parabolic dishes on a compact grid and will map most of the southern sky over the course of four years. HIRAX has two primary science goals: to constrain Dark Energy and measure structure at high redshift, and to study radio transients and pulsars. HIRAX will observe unresolved sources of neutral hydrogen via their redshifted 21-cm emission line (`hydrogen intensity mapping'). The resulting maps of large-scale structure at redshifts 0.8-2.5 will be used to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). HIRAX will improve upon current BAO measurements from galaxy surveys by observing a larger cosmological volume (larger in both survey area and redshift range) and by measuring BAO at higher redshift when the expansion of the universe transitioned to Dark Energy domination. HIRAX will complement CHIME, a hydrogen intensity mapping experiment in the Northern Hemisphere, by completing the sky coverage in the same redshift range. HIRAX's location in the Southern Hemisphere also allows a variety of cross-correlation measurements with large-scale structure surveys at many wavelengths. Daily maps of a few thousand square degrees of the Southern Hemisphere, encompassing much of the Milky Way galaxy, will also open new opportunities for discovering and monitoring radio transients. The HIRAX correlator will have the ability to rapidly and eXperimentciently detect transient events. This new data will shed light on the poorly understood nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), enable pulsar monitoring to enhance long-wavelength gravitational wave searches, and provide a rich data set for new radio transient phenomena searches. This paper discusses the HIRAX instrument, science goals, and current status.
  • The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) is designed to make high angular resolution measurements of anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at millimeter wavelengths. We describe ACTPol, an upgraded receiver for ACT, which uses feedhorn-coupled, polarization-sensitive detector arrays, a 3 degree field of view, 100 mK cryogenics with continuous cooling, and meta material anti-reflection coatings. ACTPol comprises three arrays with separate cryogenic optics: two arrays at a central frequency of 148 GHz and one array operating simultaneously at both 97 GHz and 148 GHz. The combined instrument sensitivity, angular resolution, and sky coverage are optimized for measuring angular power spectra, clusters via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signals, and CMB lensing due to large scale structure. The receiver was commissioned with its first 148 GHz array in 2013, observed with both 148 GHz arrays in 2014, and has recently completed its first full season of operations with the full suite of three arrays. This paper provides an overview of the design and initial performance of the receiver and related systems.
  • The most X-ray luminous cluster known, RXJ1347-1145 (z=0.45), has been the object of extensive study across the electromagnetic spectrum. We have imaged the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) at 90 GHz (3.3 mm) in RXJ1347-1145 at 10" resolution with the 64-pixel MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), confirming a previously reported strong, localized enhancement of the SZE 20" to the South-East of the center of X-ray emission. This enhancement of the SZE has been interpreted as shock-heated (> 20 keV) gas caused by an ongoing major (low mass-ratio) merger event. Our data support this interpretation. We also detect a pronounced asymmetry in the projected cluster pressure profile, with the pressure just east of the cluster core ~1.6 times higher than just to the west. This is the highest resolution image of the SZE made to date.
  • Boomerang, Maxima, DASI, CBI and VSA significantly increase the case for accelerated expansion in the early universe (the inflationary paradigm) and at the current epoch (dark energy dominance), especially when combined with data on high redshift supernovae (SN1) and large scale structure (LSS). There are ``7 pillars of Inflation'' that can be shown with the CMB probe, and at least 5, and possibly 6, of these have already been demonstrated in the CMB data: (1) a large scale gravitational potential; (2) acoustic peaks/dips; (3) damping due to shear viscosity; (4) a Gaussian (maximally random) distribution; (5) secondary anisotropies; (6) polarization. A 7th pillar, anisotropies induced by gravity wave quantum noise, could be too small. A minimal inflation parameter set, \omega_b,\omega_{cdm}, \Omega_{tot}, \Omega_Q,w_Q,n_s,\tau_C, \sigma_8}, is used to illustrate the power of the current data. We find the CMB+LSS+SN1 data give \Omega_{tot} =1.00^{+.07}_{-.03}, consistent with (non-baroque) inflation theory. Restricting to \Omega_{tot}=1, we find a nearly scale invariant spectrum, n_s =0.97^{+.08}_{-.05}. The CDM density, \Omega_{cdm}{\rm h}^2 =.12^{+.01}_{-.01}, and baryon density, \Omega_b {\rm h}^2 = >.022^{+.003}_{-.002}, are in the expected range. (The Big Bang nucleosynthesis estimate is 0.019\pm 0.002.) Substantial dark (unclustered) energy is inferred, \Omega_Q \approx 0.68 \pm 0.05, and CMB+LSS \Omega_Q values are compatible with the independent SN1 estimates. The dark energy equation of state, crudely parameterized by a quintessence-field pressure-to-density ratio w_Q, is not well determined by CMB+LSS (w_Q < -0.4 at 95% CL), but when combined with SN1 the resulting w_Q < -0.7 limit is quite consistent with the w_Q=-1 cosmological constant case.