• We elaborate on existing notions of contact geometry and Poisson geometry as applied to the classical ideal gas. Specifically we observe that it is possible to describe its dynamics using a 3-dimensional contact submanifold of the standard 5-dimensional contact manifold used in the literature. This reflects the fact that the internal energy of the ideal gas depends exclusively on its temperature. We also present a Poisson algebra of thermodynamic operators for a quantum-like description of the classical ideal gas. The central element of this Poisson algebra is proportional to Boltzmann's constant. A Hilbert space of states is identified and a system of wave equations governing the wavefunction is found. Expectation values for the operators representing pressure, volume and temperature are found to satisfy the classical equations of state.
  • The holographic principle sets an upper bound on the total entropy content of the Universe. Within the limits of a Newtonian approximation, a quantum-mechanical model is presented to describe the cosmological fluid. Under the assumption that gravitational equipotential surfaces can be identified with isoentropic surfaces, this model allows for a simple computation of the gravitational entropy of the Universe. The results thus obtained no longer saturate the holographic bound, thus representing a considerable improvement on previous theoretical estimates.
  • We determine the $L^p$-spectrum of the Schr\"odinger operator with the inverted harmonic oscillator potential $V(x)=-x^2$ for $1 \leq p \leq \infty$.
  • A dynamical estimate is given for the Boltzmann entropy of the Universe, under the simplifying assumptions provided by Newtonian cosmology. We first model the cosmological fluid as the probability fluid of a quantum-mechanical system. Next, following current ideas about the emergence of spacetime, we regard gravitational equipotentials as isoentropic surfaces. Therefore gravitational entropy is proportional to the vacuum expectation value of the gravitational potential in a certain quantum state describing the matter contents of the Universe. The entropy of the matter sector can also be computed. While providing values of the entropy that turn out to be somewhat higher than existing estimates, our results are in perfect compliance with the upper bound set by the holographic principle.
  • The classical thermostatics of equilibrium processes is shown to possess a quantum-mechanical dual theory with a finite-dimensional Hilbert space of quantum states. Specifically, the kernel of a certain Hamiltonian operator becomes the Hilbert space of quasistatic quantum mechanics. The relation of thermostatics to topological field theory is also discussed in the context of the emergent approach to quantum theory, where the concept of entropy plays a key role.
  • Expressing the Schroedinger Lagrangian ${\cal L}$ in terms of the quantum wavefunction $\psi=\exp(S+{\rm i}I)$ yields the conserved Noether current ${\bf J}=\exp(2S)\nabla I$. When $\psi$ is a stationary state, the divergence of ${\bf J}$ vanishes. One can exchange $S$ with $I$ to obtain a new Lagrangian $\tilde{\cal L}$ and a new Noether current $\tilde{\bf J}=\exp(2I)\nabla S$, conserved under the equations of motion of $\tilde{\cal L}$. However this new current $\tilde{\bf J}$ is generally not conserved under the equations of motion of the original Lagrangian ${\cal L}$. We analyse the role played by $\tilde{\bf J}$ in the case when classical configuration space is a complex manifold, and relate its nonvanishing divergence to the inexistence of complex-analytic wavefunctions in the quantum theory described by ${\cal L}$.
  • We present a map of standard quantum mechanics onto a dual theory, that of the classical thermodynamics of irreversible processes. While no gravity is present in our construction, our map exhibits features that are reminiscent of the holographic principle of quantum gravity.
  • We present a brief overview of some key concepts in the theory of generalised complex manifolds. This new geometry interpolates, so to speak, between symplectic geometry and complex geometry. As such it provides an ideal framework to analyse thermodynamical fluctuation theory in the presence of gravitational fields. To illustrate the usefulness of generalised complex geometry, we examine a simplified version of the Unruh effect: the thermalising effect of gravitational fields on the Schroedinger wavefunction.
  • Quantum mechanics has been argued to be a coarse-graining of some underlying deterministic theory. Here we support this view by establishing a map between certain solutions of the Schroedinger equation, and the corresponding solutions of the irrotational Navier-Stokes equation for viscous fluid flow. As a physical model for the fluid itself we propose the quantum probability fluid. It turns out that the (state-dependent) viscosity of this fluid is proportional to Planck's constant, while the volume density of entropy is proportional to Boltzmann's constant. Stationary states have zero viscosity and a vanishing time rate of entropy density. On the other hand, the nonzero viscosity of nonstationary states provides an information-loss mechanism whereby a deterministic theory (a classical fluid governed by the Navier-Stokes equation) gives rise to an emergent theory (a quantum particle governed by the Schroedinger equation).
  • We elaborate on the existing notion that quantum mechanics is an emergent phenomenon, by presenting a thermodynamical theory that is dual to quantum mechanics. This dual theory is that of classical irreversible thermodynamics. The linear regime of irreversibility considered here corresponds to the semiclassical approximation in quantum mechanics. An important issue we address is how the irreversibility of time evolution in thermodynamics is mapped onto the quantum-mechanical side of the correspondence.
  • It has been argued that gravity acts dissipatively on quantum-mechanical systems, inducing thermal fluctuations that become indistinguishable from quantum fluctuations. This has led some authors to demand that some form of time irreversibility be incorporated into the formalism of quantum mechanics. As a tool towards this goal we propose a thermodynamical approach to quantum mechanics, based on Onsager's classical theory of irreversible processes and on Prigogine's nonunitary transformation theory. An entropy operator replaces the Hamiltonian as the generator of evolution. The canonically conjugate variable corresponding to the entropy is a dimensionless evolution parameter. Contrary to the Hamiltonian, the entropy operator is not a conserved Noether charge. Our construction succeeds in implementing gravitationally-induced irreversibility in the quantum theory.
  • Quantum mechanics emerges a la Verlinde from a foliation of space by holographic screens, when regarding the latter as entropy reservoirs that a particle can exchange entropy with. This entropy is quantised in units of Boltzmann's constant k. The holographic screens can be treated thermodynamically as stretched membranes. On that side of a holographic screen where spacetime has already emerged, the energy representation of thermodynamics gives rise to the usual quantum mechanics. A knowledge of the different surface densities of entropy flow across all screens is equivalent to a knowledge of the quantum-mechanical wavefunction on space. The entropy representation of thermodynamics, as applied to a screen, can be used to describe quantum mechanics in the absence of spacetime, that is, quantum mechanics beyond a holographic screen, where spacetime has not yet emerged. Our approach can be regarded as a formal derivation of Planck's constant h from Boltzmann's constant k.
  • We present an explicit construction of a unitary representation of the commutator algebra satisfied by position and momentum operators on the Moyal plane.
  • We study the eikonal approximation to quantum mechanics on the Moyal plane. Instead of using a star product, the analysis is carried out in terms of operator-valued wavefunctions depending on noncommuting, operator-valued coordinates.
  • We elaborate on the existing idea that quantum mechanics is an emergent phenomenon, in the form of a coarse-grained description of some underlying deterministic theory. We apply the Ricci flow as a technical tool to implement dissipation, or information loss, in the passage from an underlying deterministic theory to its emergent quantum counterpart. A key ingedient in this construction is the fact that the space of physically inequivalent quantum states (either pure or mixed) has positive Ricci curvature. This leads us to an interesting thermodynamical analogy of emergent quantum mechanics.
  • We obtain Schroedinger quantum mechanics from Perelman's functional and from the Ricci flow equations of a conformally flat Riemannian metric on a closed 2-dimensional configuration space. We explore links with the recently discussed "emergent quantum mechanics".
  • We construct the classical mechanics associated with a conformally flat Riemannian metric on a compact, n-dimensional manifold without boundary. The corresponding gradient Ricci flow equation turns out to equal the time-dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation of the mechanics so defined.
  • The Ricci flow equation of a conformally flat Riemannian metric on a closed 2-dimensional configuration space is analysed. It turns out to be equivalent to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a point particle subject to a potential function that is proportional to the Ricci scalar curvature of configuration space. This allows one to obtain Schroedinger quantum mechanics from Perelman's action functional: the quantum-mechanical wavefunction is the exponential of $i$ times the conformal factor of the metric on configuration space. We explore links with the recently discussed emergent quantum mechanics.
  • We establish a 1-to-1 relation between metrics on compact Riemann surfaces without boundary, and mechanical systems having those surfaces as configuration spaces.
  • It has been argued that, underlying any given quantum-mechanical model, there exists at least one deterministic system that reproduces, after prequantisation, the given quantum dynamics. For a quantum mechanics with a complex d-dimensional Hilbert space, the Lie group SU(d) represents classical canonical transformations on the projective space CP^{d-1} of quantum states. Let R stand for the Ricci flow of the manifold SU(d-1) down to one point, and let P denote the projection from the Hopf bundle onto its base CP^{d-1}. Then the underlying deterministic model we propose here is the Lie group SU(d), acted on by the operation PR. Finally we comment on some possible consequences that our model may have on a quantum theory of gravity.
  • Quantum mechanics rests on the assumption that time is a classical variable. As such, classical time is assumed to be measurable with infinite accuracy. However, all real clocks are subject to quantum fluctuations, which leads to the existence of a nonzero uncertainty in the time variable. The existence of a quantum of time modifies the Heisenberg evolution equation for observables. In this letter we propose and analyse a generalisation of Heisenberg's equation for observables evolving in real time (the time variable measured by real clocks), that takes the existence of a quantum of time into account. This generalisation of Heisenberg's equation turns out to be a delay-differential equation.
  • Dirichlet branes are objects whose transverse coordinates in space are matrix-valued functions. This leads to considering a matrix algebra or, more generally, a Lie algebra, as the classical phase space of a certain dynamics where the multiplication of coordinates, being given by matrix multiplication, is nonabelian. Further quantising this dynamics by means of a star-product introduces noncommutativity (besides nonabelianity) as a quantum h-deformation. The algebra of functions on a standard Poisson manifold is replaced with the universal enveloping algebra of the given Lie algebra. We define generalised Poisson brackets on this universal enveloping algebra, examine their properties, and conclude that they provide a natural framework for dynamical setups (such as coincident Dirichlet branes) where coordinates are matrix-valued, rather than number-valued, functions.
  • We prove that Wigner functions contain a symplectic connection. The latter covariantises the symplectic exterior derivative on phase space. We analyse the role played by this connection and introduce the notion of local symplectic covariance of quantum-mechanical states. This latter symmetry is at work in the Schroedinger equation on phase space.
  • Any quantum-mechanical system possesses a U(1) gerbe naturally defined on configuration space. Acting on Feynman's kernel exp(iS/h), this U(1) symmetry allows one to arbitrarily pick the origin for the classical action S, on a point-by-point basis on configuration space. This is equivalent to the statement that quantum mechanics is a U(1) gauge theory. Unlike Yang-Mills theories, however, the geometry of this gauge symmetry is not given by a fibre bundle, but rather by a gerbe. Since this gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken, an analogue of the Higgs mechanism must be present. We prove that a Heisenberg-like noncommutativity for the space coordinates is responsible for the breaking. This allows to interpret the noncommutativity of space coordinates as a Higgs mechanism on the quantum-mechanical U(1) gerbe.
  • We study the selfadjoint time operator recently constructed by one of the authors. We will show that this time operator must be interpreted as a ``selfadjoint variant'' of the time operator.