• We have used the AMR hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity of stellar feedback in a sheet-like molecular cloud formed through the action of the thermal instability. We simulate the interaction of the mechanical energy input from a 15 solar mass star and a 40 solar mass star into a 100 pc-diameter 17000 solar mass cloud with a corrugated sheet morphology that in projection appears filamentary. The stellar winds are introduced using appropriate Geneva stellar evolution models. In the 15 solar mass star case, the wind forms a narrow bipolar cavity with minimal effect on the parent cloud. In the 40 solar mass star case, the more powerful stellar wind creates a large cylindrical cavity through the centre of the cloud. After 12.5 Myrs and 4.97 Myrs respectively, the massive stars explode as supernovae (SNe). In the 15 solar mass star case, the SN material and energy is primarily deposited into the molecular cloud surroundings over ~10^5 years before the SN remnant escapes the cloud. In the 40 solar mass star case, a significant fraction of the SN material and energy rapidly escapes the molecular cloud along the wind cavity in a few tens of kiloyears. Both SN events compress the molecular cloud material around them to higher densities (so may trigger further star formation), and strengthen the magnetic field, typically by factors of 2-3 but up to a factor of 10. Our simulations are relevant to observations of bubbles in flattened ring-like molecular clouds and bipolar HII regions.
  • We use 3D hydrodynamical models to investigate the effects of massive star feedback from winds and supernovae on inhomogeneous molecular material left over from the formation of a massive stellar cluster. We simulate the interaction of the mechanical energy input from a cluster with 3 O-stars into a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 solar masses of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. The cluster wind blows out of the molecular clump along low-density channels, into which denser clump material is entrained. We find that the densest molecular regions are surprisingly resistant to ablation by the cluster wind, in part due to shielding by other dense regions closer to the cluster. Nonetheless, molecular material is gradually removed by the cluster wind during which mass-loading factors in excess of several 100 are obtained. Because the clump is very porous, 60-75 per cent of the injected wind energy escapes the simulation domain, with the difference being radiated. After 4.4 Myr, the massive stars in our simulation begin to explode as supernovae. The highly structured environment into which the SN energy is released allows even weaker coupling to the remaining dense material and practically all of the SN energy reaches the wider environment. The molecular material is almost completely dispersed and destroyed after 6 Myr. The escape fraction of ionizing radiation is estimated to be about 50 per cent during the first 4 Myr of the cluster's life. A similar model with a larger and more massive GMC clump reveals the same general picture, though more time is needed for it to be destroyed.
  • Cyg OB2 #9 is one of a small set of non-thermal radio emitting massive O-star binaries. The non-thermal radiation is due to synchrotron emission in the colliding-wind region. Cyg OB2 #9 was only recently discovered to be a binary system and a multi-wavelength campaign was organized to study its 2011 periastron passage. We report here on the results of the radio observations obtained in this monitoring campaign. We used the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) radio interferometer to obtain 6 and 20 cm continuum fluxes. The observed radio light curve shows a steep drop in flux sometime before periastron. The fluxes drop to a level that is comparable to the expected free-free emission from the stellar winds, suggesting that the non-thermal emitting region is completely hidden at that time. After periastron passage, the fluxes slowly increase. We introduce a simple model to solve the radiative transfer in the stellar winds and the colliding-wind region, and thus determine the expected behaviour of the radio light curve. From the asymmetry of the light curve, we show that the primary has the stronger wind. This is somewhat unexpected if we use the astrophysical parameters based on theoretical calibrations. But it becomes entirely feasible if we take into account that a given spectral type - luminosity class combination covers a range of astrophysical parameters. The colliding-wind region also contributes to the free-free emission, which can help to explain the high values of the spectral index seen after periastron passage. Combining our data with older Very Large Array (VLA) data allows us to derive a period P = 860.0 +- 3.7 days for this system. With this period, we update the orbital parameters that were derived in the first paper of this series.
  • The key empirical property of the X-ray emission from O stars is a strong correlation between the bolometric and X-ray luminosities. In the framework of the Chandra Carina Complex Project, 129 O and B stars have been detected as X-ray sources; 78 of those, all with spectral type earlier than B3, have enough counts for at least a rough X-ray spectral characterization. This leads to an estimate of the Lx/Lbol ratio for an exceptional number of 60 O stars belonging to the same region and triples the number of Carina massive stars studied spectroscopically in X-rays. The derived log(Lx/Lbol) is -7.26 for single objects, with a dispersion of only 0.21dex. Using the properties of hot massive stars listed in the literature, we compare the X-ray luminosities of different types of objects. In the case of O stars, the Lx/Lbol ratios are similar for bright and faint objects, as well as for stars of different luminosity classes or spectral types. Binaries appear only slightly harder and slightly more luminous in X-rays than single objects; the differences are not formally significant (at the 1% level), except for the Lx/Lbol ratio in the medium (1.0--2.5keV) energy band. Weak-wind objects have similar X-ray luminosities but they display slightly softer spectra compared to "normal" O stars with the same bolometric luminosity. Discarding three overluminous objects, we find a very shallow trend of harder emission in brighter objects. The properties of the few B stars bright enough to yield some spectral information appear to be different overall (constant X-ray luminosities, harder spectra), hinting that another mechanism for producing X-rays, besides wind shocks, might be at work. However, it must be stressed that the earliest and X-ray brightest amongst these few detected objects are similar to the latest O stars, suggesting a possibly smooth transition between the two processes.
  • The turbulent destruction of a cloud subject to the passage of an adiabatic shock is studied. We find large discrepancies between the lifetime of the cloud and the analytical result of Hartquist et al. (1986). These differences appear to be due to the assumption in Hartquist et al. that mass-loss occurs largely as a result of lower pressure regions on the surface of the cloud away from the stagnation point, whereas in reality Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities play a dominant role in the cloud destruction. We find that the true lifetime of the cloud (defined as when all of the material from the core of the cloud is well mixed with the intercloud material in the hydrodynamic cells) is about 6 times t_KHD, where t_KHD is the growth timescale for the most disruptive, long-wavelength, KH instabilities. These findings have wide implications for diffuse sources where there is transfer of material between hot and cool phases. The properties of the interaction as a function of Mach number and cloud density contrast are also studied. The interaction is milder at lower Mach numbers with the most marked differences occuring at low shock Mach numbers when the postshock gas is subsonic with respect to the cloud (i.e. M < 2.76). Material stripped off the cloud only forms a long "tail-like" feature if the density contrast of the cloud to the ambient medium, chi > 1e3.
  • Several colliding-wind massive binaries are known to be non-thermal emitters in the radio domain. This constitutes strong evidence for the fact that an efficient particle acceleration process is at work in these objects. The acceleration mechanism is most probably the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA) process in the presence of strong hydrodynamic shocks due to the colliding-winds. In order to investigate the physics of this particle acceleration, we initiated a multiwavelength campaign covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this context, the detailed study of the hard X-ray emission from these sources in the SIMBOL-X bandpass constitutes a crucial element in order to probe this still poorly known topic of astrophysics. It should be noted that colliding-wind massive binaries should be considered as very valuable targets for the investigation of particle acceleration in a similar way as supernova remnants, but in a different region of the parameter space.
  • The interaction of a shock with a cloud has been extensively studied in the literature, where the effects of magnetic fields, radiative cooling and thermal conduction have been considered. However, the formation of fully developed turbulence has often been prevented by the artificial viscosity inherent in hydrodynamical simulations, and a uniform post-shock flow has been assumed in all previous single-cloud studies. In reality, the flow behind the shock is also likely to be turbulent, with non-uniform density, pressure and velocity structure created as the shock sweeps over inhomogenities upstream of the cloud. To address these twin issues we use a sub-grid compressible k-epsilon turbulence model to estimate the properties of the turbulence generated in shock-cloud interactions and the resulting increase in the transport coefficients that the turbulence brings. A detailed comparison with the output from an inviscid hydrodynamical code puts these new results into context. We find that cloud destruction in inviscid and k-epsilon models occurs at roughly the same speed when the post-shock flow is smooth and when the density contrast between the cloud and inter-cloud medium is less than 100. However, there are increasing and significant differences as this contrast increases. Clouds subjected to strong ``buffeting'' by a highly turbulent post-shock environment are destroyed significantly quicker. Additional calculations with an inviscid code where the post-shock flow is given random, grid-scale, motions confirms the more rapid destruction of the cloud. Our results clearly show that turbulence plays an important role in shock-cloud interactions, and that environmental turbulence adds a new dimension to the parameter space which has hitherto been studied (abridged).
  • We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star Eta Carinae, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of Eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggesting that the line-forming region is >1.6 stellar radii from the companion star. We show that simple geometrical models cannot simultaneously fit both the observed centroid variations and changes in line width as a function of phase. We show that the observed profiles can be fitted with synthetic profiles with a reasonable model of the emissivity along the wind-wind collision boundary. We use this analysis to help constrain the line formation region as a function of orbital phase, and the orbital geometry.
  • Radio emission models of colliding wind binaries (CWBs) have been discussed by Dougherty et al. (2003). We extend these models by considering the temporal and spatial evolution of the energy distribution of relativistic electrons as they advect downstream from their shock acceleration site. The energy spectrum evolves significantly due to the strength of inverse-Compton (IC) cooling in these systems, and a full numerical evaluation of the synchrotron emission and absorption coefficients is made. We have demonstrated that the geometry of the WCR and the streamlines of the flow within it lead to a spatially dependent break frequency in the synchrotron emission. We therefore do not observe a single, sharp break in the synchrotron spectrum integrated over the WCR, but rather a steepening of the synchrotron spectrum towards higher frequencies. We also observe that emission from the wind-collision region (WCR) may appear brightest near the shocks, since the impact of IC cooling on the non-thermal electron distribution is greatest near the contact discontinuity (CD). We show that the thermal emission from a CWB can mimic a thermal plus non-thermal composite spectrum if the thermal emission from the WCR becomes comparable to that from the unshocked winds, and obtain a number of insights relevant to models of closer systems such as WR140. Finally, we apply our new models to the very wide system WR147. The acceleration of non-thermal electrons appears to be very efficient in our models of WR147, and we suggest that the shock structure may be modified by feedback from the accelerated particles. (Abridged).
  • We investigate the Mach number dependence of the radiative overstability of shocks. We find that the stability of radiative shocks increases with decreasing Mach number, with the result that M=2 shocks require cooling exponents < -1.2 to be overstable. The frequency of oscillation of the fundamental mode has a strong Mach number dependence. We find that feedback between the cooling region and the cold dense layer (CDL) further downstream is a function of Mach number, with stronger feedback and oscillation of the boundary between the CDL and the cooling region occuring at lower Mach numbers. This feedback can be quantified in terms of the reflection coefficient of sound waves. An interesting finding is that the stability properties of low Mach number shocks can be dramatically altered if the shocked gas is able to cool to temperatures less than the pre-shock value, and it is probable that low Mach number astrophysical shocks will be overstable in a variety of situations. The results of this work are relevant to astrophysical shocks with low Mach numbers, such as supernova remnants (SNRs) immersed in a hot interstellar medium (e.g., within a starburst region), and shocks in molecular clouds, where time-dependent chemistry can lead to overstability. (Abridged)
  • We discuss the results of two XMM-Newton observations of the open cluster NGC6604 obtained in April and September 2002. We concentrate mainly on the multiple system HD167971 (O5-8V + O5-8V + (O8I)). The soft part of the EPIC spectrum of this system is thermal with typical temperatures of about 2 10^6 to 9 10^6 K. The nature (thermal vs non-thermal) of the hard part of the spectrum is not unambiguously revealed by our data. If the emission is thermal, the high temperature of the plasma (~ 2.3 10^7 to 4.6 10^7 K) would be typical of what should be expected from a wind-wind interaction zone within a long period binary system. This emission could arise from an interaction between the combined winds of the O5-8V + O5-8V close binary system and that of the more distant O8I companion. Assuming instead that the hard part of the spectrum is non-thermal, the photon index would be rather steep (~3). Moreover, a marginal variability between our two XMM-Newton pointings could be attributed to an eclipse of the O5-8V + O5-8V system. The overall X-ray luminosity points to a significant X-ray luminosity excess of about a factor 4 possibly due to colliding winds. Considering HD167971 along with several recent X-ray and radio observations, we propose that the simultaneous observation of non-thermal radiation in the X-ray (below 10.0 keV) and radio domains appears rather unlikely. Our investigation of our XMM-Newton data of NGC6604 reveals a rather sparse distribution of X-ray emitters. Including the two bright non-thermal radio emitters HD168112 and HD167971, we present a list of 31 X-ray sources... (see paper for full abstract)
  • We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the non-thermal radio emitter HD168112 (O5.5III(f^+)). The detailed analysis of two quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observations reveals strong variability of this star both in the X-ray and radio ranges. The X-ray observations separated by five months reveal a decrease of the X-ray flux of ~30%. The radio emission on the other hand increases by a factor 5-7 between the two observations obtained roughly simultaneously with the XMM-Newton pointings. The X-ray data reveal a hard emission that is most likely produced by a thermal plasma at kT ~2-3 keV while the VLA data confirm the non-thermal status of this star in the radio waveband. Comparison with archive X-ray and radio data confirms the variability of this source in both wavelength ranges over a yet ill defined time scale. The properties of HD168112 in the X-ray and radio domain point towards a binary system with a significant eccentricity and an orbital period of a few years. However, our optical spectra reveal no significant changes of the star's radial velocity suggesting that if HD168112 is indeed a binary, it must be seen under a fairly low inclination.
  • We report the analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the close binary HD159176 (O7V + O7V). The observed L_X/L_bol ratio reveals an X-ray luminosity exceeding by a factor ~ 7 the expected value for X-ray emission from single O-stars, therefore suggesting a wind-wind interaction scenario. EPIC and RGS spectra are fitted consistently with a two temperature mekal optically thin thermal plasma model, with temperatures ranging from ~ 2 to 6 10^6 K. At first sight, these rather low temperatures are consistent with the expectations for a close binary system where the winds collide well before reaching their terminal velocities. We also investigate the variability of the X-ray light curve of HD159176 on various short time scales. No significant variability is found and we conclude that if hydrodynamical instabilities exist in the wind interaction region of HD159176, they are not sufficient to produce an observable signature in the X-ray emission. Hydrodynamic simulations using wind parameters from the literature reveal some puzzling discrepancies. The most striking one concerns the predicted X-ray luminosity which is one or more orders of magnitude larger than the observed one. A significant reduction of the mass loss rate of the components compared to the values quoted in the literature alleviates the discrepancy but is not sufficient to fully account for the observed luminosity. Because hydrodynamical models are best for the adiabatic case whereas the colliding winds in HD159176 are most likely highly radiative, a totally new approach has been envisaged... (see paper for complete abstract)
  • We present a linear stability analysis of a flow undergoing conductively-driven mass-loading from embedded clouds. We find that mass-loading damps isobaric and isentropic perturbations, and in this regard is similar to the effect of thermal conduction, but is much more pronounced where many embedded clumps exist. The stabilizing influence of mass-loading is wavelength independent against isobaric (condensing) perturbations, but wavelength dependent against isentropic (wave-like) perturbations. We derive equations for the degree of mass-loading needed to stabilize such perturbations. We have also made 1D numerical simulations of a mass-loaded radiative shock and demonstrated the damping of the overstability when mass-loading is rapid enough.
  • One aspect of supernova remnant evolution that is relatively unstudied is the influence of an AGN environment. A high density ambient medium and a nearby powerful continuum source will assist the cooling of shocked ejecta and swept-up gas. Motion of the surrounding medium relative to the remnant will also affect the remnant morphology. In an extension to previous work we have performed 2D hydrodynamical calculations of SNR evolution in an AGN environment, and have determined the evolutionary behaviour of cold gas in the remnant. The cold gas will contribute to the observed broad line emission in AGNs, and we present preliminary theoretical line profiles from our calculations. A more detailed comparison with observations will be performed in future work. The SNR-AGN interaction may be useful as a diagnostic of the AGN wind.
  • We investigate the evolution of spherically symmetric supernova remnants in which mass loading takes place due to conductively driven evaporation of embedded clouds. Numerical simulations reveal significant differences between the evolution of conductively mass loaded and the ablatively mass loaded remnants studied in Paper I. A main difference is the way in which conductive mass loading is extinguished at fairly early times, once the interior temperature of the remnant falls below ~10 million K. Thus, at late times remnants that ablatively mass load are dominated by loaded mass and thermal energy, while those that conductively mass load are dominated by swept-up mass and kinetic energy. Simple approximations to the remnant evolution, complementary to those in Paper I, are given.
  • We investigate which shocked wind is responsible for the majority of the X-ray emission in colliding wind binaries, an issue where there is some confusion in the literature, and which we show is more complicated than has been assumed. We find that where both winds rapidly cool (typically close binaries), the ratio of the wind speeds is often more important than the momentum ratio, because it controls the energy flux ratio, and the faster wind is generally the dominant emitter. When both winds are largely adiabatic (typically long-period binaries), the slower and denser wind will cool faster and the stronger wind generally dominates the X-ray luminosity.
  • We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind momentum ratio of this system. However, as the WR wind dominates the colliding wind X-ray emission it appears unlikely that the mass-loss rate and the terminal velocity of the companion wind can be separately determined from X-ray observations. We also note an inconsistency between numerical and analytical estimates of the X-ray luminosity ratio of the stronger and weaker wind components, and conclude that the analytical results are in error.
  • We show that a cooled region of shocked supernova ejecta forms in a type II supernova-QSO wind interaction, and has a density, an ionization parameter, and a column density compatible with those inferred for the high ionization component of the broad emission line regions in QSOs. The calculations are based on the assumption that the ejecta flow is described initially by a similarity solution investigated by Chevalier (1982) and Nadyozhin (1985) and is spherically symmetric. Heating and cooling appropriate for gas irradiated by a nearby powerful continuum source is included in our model, together with reasonable assumptions for the properties of the QSO wind. The model results are also in agreement with observational correlations and imply reasonable supernova rates.
  • We present similarity solutions for adiabatic bubbles that are blown by winds having time independent mechanical luminosities and that are each mass-loaded by the hydrodynamic ablation of distributed clumps. The mass loading is `switched-on' at a specified radius (with free-expansion of the wind interior to this point) and injects mass at a rate per unit volume proportional to M^delta r^lambda where delta = 4/3 (1) if the flow is subsonic (supersonic) with respect to the clumps. In the limit of negligible mass loading a similarity solution found by Dyson (1973) for expansion into a smooth ambient medium is recovered. The presence of mass loading heats the flow, which leads to a reduction in the Mach number of the supersonic freely-expanding flow, and weaker jump conditions across the inner shock. In solutions with large mass loading, it is possible for the wind to connect directly to the contact discontinuity without first passing through an inner shock. For a solution that gives the mass of swept-up ambient gas to be less than the sum of the masses of the wind and ablated material, lambda < -2. Maximum possible values for the ratio of ablated mass to wind mass occur when mass loading starts very close to the bubble center and when the flow is supersonic with respect to the clumps over the entire bubble radius. The maximum temperature in the bubble often occurs near the onset of mass loading, and in some cases can be many times greater than the post-inner-shock temperature. Our solutions are relevant to eg stellar wind-blown bubbles, galactic winds, etc. This work complements Pittard et al (2001) where it was assumed that clumps were evaporated through conductive energy transport.