• Surface brightness profiles for 23 M31 star clusters were measured using images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope, and fit to two types of models to determine the clusters' structural properties. The clusters are primarily young (~10^8 yr) and massive (~10^4.5 solar masses), with median half-light radius 7 pc and dissolution times of a few Gyr. The properties of the M31 clusters are comparable to those of clusters of similar age in the Magellanic Clouds. Simulated star clusters are used to derive a conversion from statistical measures of cluster size to half-light radius so that the extragalactic clusters can be compared to young massive clusters in the Milky Way. All three sets of star clusters fall approximately on the same age-size relation. The young M31 clusters are expected to dissolve within a few Gyr and will not survive to become old, globular clusters. However, they do appear to follow the same fundamental plane relations as old clusters; if confirmed with velocity dispersion measurements, this would be a strong indication that the star cluster fundamental plane reflects universal cluster formation conditions.
  • {Aims.} We introduce our imaging survey of possible young massive globular clusters in M31 performed with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We present here details of the data reduction pipeline that is being applied to all the survey data and describe its application to the brightest among our targets, van den Bergh 0 (VdB0), taken as a test case. {Methods.} The reddening, the age and the metallicity of the cluster are estimated by comparison of the observed Color Magnitude Diagram (CMD) with theoretical isochrones. {Results.} Under the most conservative assumptions the stellar mass of VdB0 is M > 2.4 x 10^4 M_sun, but our best estimates lie in the range ~ 4-9 x 10^4 M_sun. The CMD of VdB0 is best reproduced by models having solar metallicity and age = 25 Myr. Ages smaller than = 12 Myr and larger than = 60 Myr are clearly ruled out by the available data. The cluster has a remarkable number of Red Super Giants (> 18) and a CMD very similar to Large Magellanic Cloud clusters usually classified as young globulars such as NGC 1850, for example. {Conclusions.} VdB0 is significantly brighter (>~ 1 mag) than Galactic open clusters of similar age. Its present-day mass and half-light radius (r_h=7.4 pc) are more typical of faint globular clusters than of open clusters. However, given its position within the disk of M31 it is expected to be destroyed by dynamical effects, in particular by encounters with giant molecular clouds, within the next ~ 4 Gyr.
  • [ABRIGED] We present the optical identification of a sample of 695 X-ray sources detected in the first 1.3 deg^2 of the XMM-COSMOS survey, down to a 0.5-2 keV (2-10 keV) limiting flux of ~10^-15 erg cm-2 s-1 (~5x10^-15 erg cm^-2 s-1). We were able to associate a candidate optical counterpart to ~90% (626) of the X-ray sources, while for the remaining ~10% of the sources we were not able to provide a unique optical association due to the faintness of the possible optical counterparts (I_AB>25) or to the presence of multiple optical sources within the XMM-Newton error circles. We also cross-correlated the candidate optical counterparts with the Subaru multicolor and ACS catalogs and with the Magellan/IMACS, zCOSMOS and literature spectroscopic data; the spectroscopic sample comprises 248 objects (~40% of the full sample). Our analysis reveals that for ~80% of the counterparts there is a very good agreement between the spectroscopic classification, the morphological parameters as derived from ACS data, and the optical to near infrared colors. About 20% of the sources show an apparent mismatch between the morphological and spectroscopic classifications. All the ``extended'' BL AGN lie at redshift <1.5, while the redshift distribution of the full BL AGN population peaks at z~1.5. Our analysis also suggests that the Type 2/Type 1 ratio decreases towards high luminosities, in qualitative agreement with the results from X-ray spectral analysis and the most recent modeling of the X-ray luminosity function evolution.
  • Mid-infrared observations of the Andromeda galaxy, M31, obtained with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, are presented. The image mosaics cover areas of approximate 3.7deg x 1.6deg and include the satellite galaxies M32 and NGC 205. The appearance of M31 varies dramatically in the different mid-infrared bands, from the smooth bulge and disk of the old stellar population seen at 3.6um to the well-known '10 kpc ring' dominating the 8um image. The similarity of the 3.6um and optical isophotes and nearly constant optical-mid-infrared color over the inner 400 arcsec confirms that there is no significant extinction at optical wavelengths in M31's bulge. The nuclear colors indicate the presence of dust but not an infrared-bright nucleus. The integrated 8um non-stellar luminosity implies a star formation rate of 0.4 Msun/yr, consistent with other indicators that show M31 to be a quiescent galaxy.
  • We estimate the flux weighted acceleration on the Local Group (LG) from the near-infrared Two Micron All Sky Redshift Survey (2MRS). The near-infrared flux weighted dipoles are very robust because they closely approximate a mass weighted dipole, bypassing the effects of redshift distortions and require no preferred reference frame. We use this method with the redshift information to determine the change in dipole with distance. The LG dipole seemingly converges by 60 Mpc/h. Assuming convergence, the comparison of the 2MRS flux dipole and the CMB dipole provides a value for the combination of the mass density and luminosity bias parameters Omega_m^0.6/b_L= 0.40+/-0.09.
  • We estimate the acceleration on the Local Group (LG) from the Two Micron All Sky Redshift Survey (2MRS). The sample used includes about 23,200 galaxies with extinction corrected magnitudes brighter than K_s=11.25 and it allows us to calculate the flux weighted dipole. The near-infrared flux weighted dipoles are very robust because they closely approximate a mass weighted dipole, bypassing the effects of redshift distortions and require no preferred reference frame. This is combined with the redshift information to determine the change in dipole with distance. The misalignment angle between the LG and the CMB dipole drops to 12 degrees at around 50 Mpc/h, but then increases at larger distances, reaching 21 degrees at around 130 Mpc/h. Exclusion of the galaxies Maffei 1, Maffei 2, Dwingeloo 1, IC342 and M87 brings the resultant flux dipole to 14 degrees away from the CMB velocity dipole In both cases, the dipole seemingly converges by 60 Mpc/h. Assuming convergence, the comparison of the 2MRS flux dipole and the CMB dipole provides a value for the combination of the mass density and luminosity bias parameters Omega_m^0.6/b_L=0.40+/-0.09.
  • Using a redshift survey of 1779 galaxies and photometry from the 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) covering 200 square degrees, we calculate independent mass and light profiles for the infall region of the Coma cluster of galaxies. The redshift survey is complete to $K_s=12.2$ (622 galaxies), 1.2 magnitudes fainter than $M^*_{K_s}$ at the distance of Coma. We confirm the mass profile obtained by Geller, Diaferio, & Kurtz. The enclosed mass-to-light ratio measured in the $K_s$ band is approximately constant to a radius of $10 \Mpc$, where $M/L_{K_s}= 75\pm 23\mlsun$, in agreement with weak lensing results on similar scales. Within $2.5\Mpc$, X-ray estimates yield similar mass-to-light ratios (67$\pm32h$). The constant enclosed mass-to-light ratio with radius suggests that K-band light from bright galaxies in clusters traces the total mass on scales $\lesssim10 \Mpc$. Uncertainties in the mass profile imply that the mass-to-light ratio inside $r_{200}$ may be as much as a factor of 2.5 larger than that outside $r_{200}$. These data demonstrate that K-band light is not positively biased with respect to the mass; we cannot rule out antibias. These results imply $\Omega_m = 0.17 \pm 0.05$. Estimates of possible variations in $M/L_{K_s}$ with radius suggest that the density parameter is no smaller than $\Omega_m \approx 0.08$.
  • Globular clusters at the distance of M31 have apparent angular sizes of a few arcseconds. While many M31 GCs have been detected and studied from ground-based images, the high spatial resolution of HST allows much more robust detection and characterization of star cluster properties. We present the results of a search of 157 HST/WFPC2 images of M31: we found 82 previously-cataloged globular cluster candidates as well as 32 new globular cluster candidates and 20 open cluster candidates. We present images of the new candidates and photometry for all clusters. We assess existing cluster catalogs' completeness and use the results to estimate the total number of GCs in M31 as 460+/-70. The specific frequency is S_N = 1.2+/-0.2 and the mass specific frequency T = 2.4+/-0.4; these values are at the upper end of the range seen for spiral galaxies.
  • Results of a ground-based optical monitoring campaign on NGC5548 in June 1998 are presented. The broad-band fluxes (U,B,V), and the spectrophotometric optical continuum flux F_lambda(5100 A) monotonically decreased in flux while the broad-band R and I fluxes and the integrated emission-line fluxes of Halpha and Hbeta remained constant to within 5%. On June 22, a short continuum flare was detected in the broad band fluxes. It had an amplitude of about ~18% and it lasted only ~90 min. The broad band fluxes and the optical continuum F_lambda(5100 A) appear to vary simultaneously with the EUV variations. No reliable delay was detected for the broad optical emission lines in response to the EUVE variations. Narrow Hbeta emission features predicted as a signature of an accretion disk were not detected during this campaign. However, there is marginal evidence for a faint feature at lambda = 4962 A with FWHM=~6 A redshifted by Delta v = 1100 km/s with respect to Hbeta_narrow.
  • Mid-infrared images of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 279 obtained with the ISO satellite are presented together with the results of a one-year monitoring campaign of the 2.5-11.7 micron spectrum. Contemporaneous optical photometric and spectrophotometric observations are also presented. The galaxy appears as a point-like source at the resolution of the ISOCAM instrument, 4-5". The 2.5-11.7 micron average spectrum of the nucleus in Mrk 279 shows a strong power law continuum with a spectral index alpha = -0.80+/-0.05 and weak PAH emission features. The Mrk 279 spectral energy distribution shows a mid-IR bump, which extends from 2 to 15-20 micron . The mid-IR bump is consistent with thermal emission from dust grains at a distance of >= 100 light-days. No significant variations of the mid-IR flux have been detected during our observing campaign, consistent with the relatively low amplitude (~10 % rms) of the optical variability during the campaign. The time delay for the Hbeta line emission in response to the optical continuum variations is 16.7 +5.3/5.6 days, consistent with previous measurements.
  • We report on the results of a three-year program of coordinated X-ray and optical monitoring of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The rapid continuum variations observed in the X-ray spectra are not detected in the optical, although the time-averaged X-ray and optical continuum fluxes are well-correlated. Variations in the flux of the broad Hbeta line are found to lag behind the optical continuum variations by 6 days (with an uncertainty of 2-3 days), and combining this with the line width yields a virial mass estimate of about 1.1 million solar masses, at the very low end of the distribution of AGN masses measured by line reverberation. Strong variability of He II 4686 is also detected, and the response time measured is similar to that of Hbeta, but with a much larger uncertainty. The He II 4686 line is almost five times broader than Hbeta, and it is strongly blueward asymmetric, as are the high-ionization UV lines recorded in archival spectra of NGC 4051. The data are consistent with the Balmer lines arising in a low to moderate inclination disk-like configuration, and the high-ionization lines arising in an outflowing wind, of which we observe preferentially the near side. Previous observations of the narrow-line region morphology of this source suggest that the system is inclined by about 50 degrees, and if this is applicable to the broad Hbeta-emitting region, a central mass of about 1.4 million solar masses can be inferred. During the third year of monitoring, both the X-ray continuum and the He II 4686 line went into extremely low states, although the optical continuum and the Hbeta broad line were both still present and variable. We suggest that the inner part of the accretion disk may have gone into an advection-dominated state, yielding little radiation from the hotter inner disk.
  • The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) is now underway and will provide a complete census of galaxies as faint as 13.5 mag (3 mJy) at 2.2 microns for most of the sky, and ~12.1 mag (10 mJy) for regions veiled by the Milky Way. This census has already discovered nearby galaxies previously hidden behind our Galaxy, and will allow delineation of large-scale structures in the distribution of galaxies across the whole sky. Here we report the detection and discovery of new extended sources from this survey for fields incorporating the Galactic plane at longitudes between 40 and 70 deg. The area-normalized detection rate is ~1-2 galaxies per deg^2 brighter than 12.1 mag (10 mJy), roughly constant with Galactic latitude throughout the "Zone of Avoidance", of which 85-95% are newly discovered sources. In conjunction with the deep HI surveys, 2MASS will greatly increase the current census of galaxies hidden behind the Milky Way.
  • The 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) will observe over one-million galaxies and extended Galactic sources covering the entire sky at wavelengths between 1 and 2 microns. The survey catalog will have both high completeness and reliability down to J = 15.0 and Ks = 13.5 mag, equivalent to 1.6 mJy and 2.9 mJy, respectively. This paper describes the basic algorithms used to detect and characterize extended sources in the 2MASS database and catalog. Critical procedures include tracking the point spread function, image background removal, artifact removal, photometry and basic parameterization, star-galaxy discrimination and object classification using a decision tree technique. Examples of extended sources encountered in 2MASS are given.
  • In the construction of an X-ray selected sample of galaxy clusters for cosmological studies, we have assembled a sample of 495 X-ray sources found to show extended X-ray emission in the first processing of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The sample covers the celestial region with declination $\delta \ge 0\deg $ and galactic latitude $|b_{II}| \ge 20\deg $ and comprises sources with a count rate $\ge 0.06$ counts s$^{-1}$ and a source extent likelihood of 7. In an optical follow-up identification program we find 378 (76%) of these sources to be clusters of galaxies. ...
  • We present a low-flux extension of the X-ray selected ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS) published in Paper I of this series. Like the original BCS and employing an identical selection procedure, the BCS extension is compiled from ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data in the northern hemisphere (dec > 0 deg) and at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 20 deg). It comprises 100 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies with measured redshifts z < 0.3 (as well as seven more at z > 0.3) and total fluxes between 2.8 x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 and 4.4 x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band (the latter value being the flux limit of the original BCS). The extension can be combined with the main sample published in 1998 to form the homogeneously selected extended BCS (eBCS), the largest and statistically best understood cluster sample to emerge from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to date. The nominal completeness of the combined sample (defined with respect to a power law fit to the bright end of the BCS log N-log S distribution) is relatively low at 75 per cent (compared to 90 per cent for the high-flux sample of Paper I). However, just as for the original BCS, this incompleteness can be accurately quantified, and thus statistically corrected for, as a function of X-ray luminosity and redshift. In addition to its importance for improved statistical studies of the properties of clusters in the local Universe, the low-flux extension of the BCS is also intended to serve as a finding list for X-ray bright clusters in the northern hemisphere which we hope will prove useful in the preparation of cluster observations with the next generation of X-ray telescopes such as Chandra or XMM-Newton.
  • We present a new catalog of photometric and spectroscopic data on M31 globular clusters. The catalog includes new optical and near-infrared photometry for a substantial fraction of the 435 clusters and cluster candidates. We use these data to determine the reddening and intrinsic colors of individual clusters, and find that the extinction laws in the Galaxy and M31 are not significantly different. There are significant (up to 0.2mag in V-K) offsets between the clusters' intrinsic colors and simple stellar population colors predicted by population synthesis models; we suggest that these are due to systematic errors in the models. The distributions of M31 clusters' metallicities and metallicity-sensitive colors are bimodal, with peaks at [Fe/H] ~ -1.4 and -0.6. The distribution of V-I is often bimodal in elliptical galaxies' globular cluster systems, but is not sensitive enough to metallicity to show bimodality in M31 and Galactic cluster systems. The radial distribution and kinematics of the two M31 metallicity groups imply that they are analogs of the Galactic `halo' and `disk/bulge' cluster systems. The globular clusters in M31 have a small radial metallicity gradient, suggesting that some dissipation occurred during the GCS formation. The lack of correlation between cluster luminosity and metallicity in M31 GCs shows that self-enrichment is not important in GC formation.
  • We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4535, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 4535 is one of 18 galaxies observed as a part of The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale which aims to measure the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. NGC 4535 was observed over 13 epochs using the F555W filter, and over 9 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data were transformed to the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry was performed using two independent programs, DoPHOT and DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands were constructed using 39 high-quality Cepheids present in our set of 50 variable candidates. We obtain a distance modulus of 31.02+/-0.26 mag, corresponding to a distance of 16.0+/-1.9 Mpc. Our distance estimate is based on values of mu = 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(V-I) = 0.13 mag for the distance modulus and reddening of the LMC, respectively.
  • We present a 90 per cent flux-complete sample of the 201 X-ray brightest clusters of galaxies in the northern hemisphere (dec > 0 deg), at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 20 deg), with measured redshifts z < 0.3 and fluxes higher than 4.4 x 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^{-1) in the 0.1-2.4 keV band. The sample, called the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS), is selected from ROSAT All-Sky Survey data and is the largest X-ray selected cluster sample compiled to date. In addition to Abell clusters, which form the bulk of the sample, the BCS also contains the X-ray brightest Zwicky clusters and other clusters selected from their X-ray properties alone. Effort has been made to ensure the highest possible completeness of the sample and the smallest possible contamination by non-cluster X-ray sources. X-ray fluxes are computed using an algorithm tailored for the detection and characterization of X-ray emission from galaxy clusters. These fluxes are accurate to better than 15 per cent (mean 1 sigma error). We find the cumulative log N-log S distribution of clusters to follow a power law k S^(-alpha) with alpha=1.31 (+0.06)(-0.03) (errors are the 10th and 90th percentiles) down to fluxes of 2 x 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1), i.e. considerably below the BCS flux limit. Although our best-fitting slope disagrees formally with the canonical value of -1.5 for a Euclidean distribution, the BCS log N-log S distribution is consistent with a non-evolving cluster population if cosmological effects are taken into account.
  • We re-examine the existence and extent of the planar structure in the local galaxy density field, the so-called Supergalactic Plane (SGP). This structure is studied here in three dimensions using both the new Optical Redshift Survey (ORS) and the IRAS 1.2 Jy redshift survey. The density contrast in a slab of thickness of 20 Mpc/h and diameter of 80 Mpc/h aligned with the standard de Vaucouleurs' Supergalactic coordinates, is delta_sgp =0.5 for both ORS and IRAS. The structure of the SGP is not well described by a homogeneous ellipsoid, although it does appear to be a flattened structure, which we quantify by calculating the moment of inertia tensor of the density field. The directions of the principal axes vary with radius, but the minor axis remains within 30 deg of the standard SGP Z-axis, out to a radius of 80 Mpc/h, for both ORS and \iras. However, the structure changes shape with radius, varying between a flattened pancake and a dumbbell, the latter at a radius of ~50 Mpc/h, where the Great Attractor and Perseus-Pisces superclusters dominate the distribution. This calls to question the connectivity of the `plane' beyond ~40 Mpc/h. The configuration found here can be viewed as part of a web of filaments and sheets, rather than as an isolated pancake-like structure. An optimal minimum variance reconstruction of the density field using Wiener filtering which corrects for both redshift distortion and shot noise, yields a similar misalignment angle and behaviour of axes. The background-independent statistic of axes proposed here can be best used for testing cosmological models by comparison with N-body simulations.
  • We present the results of three years of ground-based observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, which combined with previously reported data, yield optical continuum and broad-line H-beta light curves for a total of eight years. The light curves consist of over 800 points, with a typical spacing of a few days between observations. During this eight-year period, the nuclear continuum has varied by more than a factor of seven, and the H-beta emission line has varied by a factor of nearly six. The H-beta emission line responds to continuum variations with a time delay or lag of 10-20 days, the precise value varying somewhat from year to year. We find some indications that the lag varies with continuum flux in the sense that the lag is larger when the source is brighter.
  • We present an essentially complete, all-sky, X-ray flux limited sample of 242 Abell clusters of galaxies (six of which are double) compiled from ROSAT All-Sky Survey data. Our sample is uncontaminated in the sense that systems featuring prominent X-ray point sources such as AGN or foreground stars have been removed. The sample is limited to high Galactic latitudes ($|b| \geq 20^{\circ}$), the nominal redshift range of the ACO catalogue of $z \leq 0.2$, and X-ray fluxes above $5.0 \times 10^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the 0.1 -- 2.4 keV band. Due to the X-ray flux limit, our sample consists, at intermediate and high redshifts, exclusively of very X-ray luminous clusters. Since the latter tend to be also optically rich, the sample is not affected by the optical selection effects and in particular not by the volume incompleteness known to be present in the Abell and ACO catalogues for richness class 0 and 1 clusters. Our sample is the largest X-ray flux limited sample of galaxy clusters compiled to date and will allow investigations of unprecedented statistical quality into the properties and distribution of rich clusters in the local Universe.
  • This Letter presents the serendipitous discovery of a large arc in an X-ray selected cluster detected in the Rosat North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey. The cluster, associated with Abell 2280, is identified as the optical counterpart of the X-ray source RXJ 1743.5+6341. This object is a medium--distant z=0.326 and luminous (L_(0.5-2 kev) = 5.06x10**44 erg/s) cluster dominated by a central bright galaxy. The arc is located ~ 14 arcsec to the North-West of the cD and it is detected in the R and I bands but not in the B band. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the cluster and of the arc are presented. Other similar discoveries in the course of imaging and spectroscopic surveys of Rosat are expected in the future.
  • (compressed version) We combine the CfA Redshift Survey (CfA2) and the Southern Sky Redshift Survey (SSRS2) to estimate the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies $\sig12$ on a scale of $\sim 1 \hmpc$. Both surveys are complete to an apparent magnitude limit $B(0)=15.5$. Our sample includes 12,812 galaxies distributed in a volume $1.8 \times 10^6 \hmpc3$. We conclude: 1) The pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the combined CfA2+SSRS2 redshift survey is $\sig12=540 \kms \pm 180 \kms$. Both the estimate and the variance of $\sig12$ significantly exceed the canonical values $\sig12=340 \pm40$ measured by Davis \& Peebles (1983) using CfA1. 2) We derive the uncertainty in $\sig12$ from the variation among subsamples with volumes on the order of $7 \times 10^5$ \hmpc3. This variation is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the formal error, 36 $\kms$, derived using least-squares fits to the CfA2+SSRS2 correlation function. This variation among samples is consistent with the conclusions of Mo \etal (1993) for a number of smaller surveys and with the analysis of CfA1 by Zurek \etal (1994). 3) When we remove Abell clusters with $R\ge1$ from our sample, the pairwise velocity dispersion of the remaining galaxies drops to $295 \pm 99 \kms$. Thus the dominant source of variance in $\sig12$ is the shot noise contributed by dense virialized systems. 4) The distribution of pairwise velocities is consistent with an isotropic exponential with velocity dispersion independent of scale.