• In this paper we report calculations of the relativistic corrections to transition frequencies (q factors) of Yb II for the transitions from the odd-parity states to the metastable state $4f^{13}6s^2 ^2F_{7/2}^o$. These transitions are of particular interest experimentally since they possess some of the largest q factors calculated to date and the $^2F_{7/2}^o$ state can be prepared with high efficiency. This makes Yb II a very attractive candidate for the laboratory search for variation of the fine-structure constant alpha.
  • The frequency spectrum of the finite temperature correction to the Casimir force can be determined by use of the Lifshitz formalism for metallic plates of finite conductivity. We show that the correction for the $TE$ electromagnetic modes is dominated by frequencies so low that the plates cannot be modelled as ideal dielectrics. We also address issues relating to the behavior of electromagnetic fields at the surfaces and within metallic conductors, and calculate the surface modes using appropriate low-frequency metallic boundary conditions. Our result brings the thermal correction into agreement with experimental results that were previously obtained. We suggest a series of measurements that will test the veracity of our analysis.
  • The frequency spectrum of the finite temperature correction to the Casimir force can be determined by the use of the Lifshitz formalism for metallic plates of finite conductivity. We show that the correction for the TE electromagnetic modes is dominated by frequencies so low that the plates cannot be modelled as ideal dielectrics. We also address the issues relating to the behavior of electromagnetic fields at the surfaces an within metallic conductors, and claculate the surface modes using appropriate low-frequency metallic boundary conditions. Our result brings the tehrmal correction into agreement with experimental results that were previously obtained.
  • A new method for examining the possible space-time variation of the fine structure constant ($\alpha$) is proposed. The technique uses a relatively simple measurement with an optical resonator to compare atom-stabilized optical frequency references. This method does not require that the exact frequency of each reference be measured, and has the potential to yield more than a 1000-fold improvement in experimental sensitivity to changes in $\alpha$. A specific realization of an experiment using this method is discussed which can approach the precision of ${\dot\alpha/\alpha}\sim10^{-18}/\tau$, where $\tau$ is the measurement time. Moreover, for this specific realization, a measurement of ${\dot\alpha/\alpha}\sim10^{-15}/{\rm yr}$ as a near-term goal is realistic.