• MHONGOOSE is a deep survey of the neutral hydrogen distribution in a representative sample of 30 nearby disk and dwarf galaxies with HI masses from 10^6 to ~10^{11} M_sun, and luminosities from M_R ~ -12 to M_R ~ -22. The sample is selected to uniformly cover the available range in log(M_HI). Our extremely deep observations, down to HI column density limits of well below 10^{18} cm^{-2} - or a few hundred times fainter than the typical HI disks in galaxies - will directly detect the effects of cold accretion from the intergalactic medium and the links with the cosmic web. These observations will be the first ever to probe the very low-column density neutral gas in galaxies at these high resolutions. Combination with data at other wavelengths, most of it already available, will enable accurate modelling of the properties and evolution of the mass components in these galaxies and link these with the effects of environment, dark matter distribution, and other fundamental properties such as halo mass and angular momentum. MHONGOOSE can already start addressing some of the SKA-1 science goals and will provide a comprehensive inventory of the processes driving the transformation and evolution of galaxies in the nearby universe at high resolution and over 5 orders of magnitude in column density. It will be a Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey that will be unsurpassed until the advent of the SKA, and can serve as a highly visible, lasting statement of MeerKAT's capabilities.
  • We obtained an optical spectrum of a star we identify as the optical counterpart of the M31 Chandra source CXO J004318.8+412016, because of prominent emission lines of the Balmer series, of neutral helium, and a He II line at 4686 Angstrom. The continuum energy distribution and the spectral characteristics demonstrate the presence of a red giant of K or earlier spectral type, so we concluded that the binary is likely to be a symbiotic system. CXO J004318.8+412016 has been observed in X-rays as a luminous supersoft source (SSS) since 1979, with effective temperature exceeding 40 eV and variable X-ray luminosity, oscillating between a few times 10(35) erg/s and a few times 10(37) erg/s. The optical, infrared and ultraviolet colors of the optical object are consistent with an an accretion disk around a compact object companion, which may either be a white dwarf, or a black hole, depending on the system parameters. If the origin of the luminous supersoft X-rays is the atmosphere of a white dwarf that is burning hydrogen in shell, it is as hot and luminous as post-thermonuclear flash novae, yet no major optical outburst has ever been observed, suggesting that the white dwarf is very massive (m>1.2 M(sol)) and it is accreting and burning at the high rate (mdot>10(-8)M(sol)/year) expected for type Ia supernovae progenitors. In this case, the X-ray variability may be due to a very short recurrence time of only mildly degenerate thermonuclear flashes.
  • We present an analysis of the positions and ages of young star clusters in eight local galaxies to investigate the connection between the age difference and separation of cluster pairs. We find that star clusters do not form uniformly but instead are distributed such that the age difference increases with the cluster pair separation to the 0.25-0.6 power, and that the maximum size over which star formation is physically correlated ranges from ~200 pc to ~1 kpc. The observed trends between age difference and separation suggest that cluster formation is hierarchical both in space and time: clusters that are close to each other are more similar in age than clusters born further apart. The temporal correlations between stellar aggregates have slopes that are consistent with turbulence acting as the primary driver of star formation. The velocity associated with the maximum size is proportional to the galaxy's shear, suggesting that the galactic environment influences the maximum size of the star-forming structures.
  • The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope, aimed at the investigation of star formation and its relation with galactic environment in nearby galaxies, from the scales of individual stars to those of ~kpc-size clustered structures. Five-band imaging, from the near-ultraviolet to the I-band, with the Wide Field Camera 3, plus parallel optical imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, is being collected for selected pointings of 50 galaxies within the local 12 Mpc. The filters used for the observations with the Wide Field Camera 3 are: F275W(2,704 A), F336W(3,355 A), F438W(4,325 A), F555W(5,308 A), and F814W(8,024 A); the parallel observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys use the filters: F435W(4,328 A), F606W(5,921 A), and F814W(8,057 A). The multi-band images are yielding accurate recent (<~50 Myr) star formation histories from resolved massive stars and the extinction-corrected ages and masses of star clusters and associations. The extensive inventories of massive stars and clustered systems will be used to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of star formation within galaxies. This will, in turn, inform theories of galaxy evolution and improve the understanding of the physical underpinning of the gas-star formation relation and the nature of star formation at high redshift. This paper describes the survey, its goals and observational strategy, and the initial science results. Because LEGUS will provide a reference survey and a foundation for future observations with JWST and with ALMA, a large number of data products are planned for delivery to the community.
  • SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn SNe which showed a significant IR excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 \mum and JHK observations of SN 2010jl \sim90 days post explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a 3D Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03-0.35 Msun of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 \times 10 ^17 cm away from the SN and inclined between 60-80\cdot to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day \sim 450. It is likely this dust was created in an LBV-like mass loss event of more than 3 Msun, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {\eta} Carinae.
  • We are investigating the formation and evolution of dust around the hydrogen-deficient supergiants known as R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars. We aim to determine the connection between the probable merger past of these stars and their current dust-production activities. We carried out high-angular resolution interferometric observations of three RCB stars, namely RY Sgr, V CrA, and V854 Cen with the mid-IR interferometer, MIDI on the VLTI, using two telescope pairs. The baselines ranged from 30 to 60 m, allowing us to probe the dusty environment at very small spatial scales (~ 50 mas or 400 stellar radii). The observations of the RCB star dust environments were interpreted using both geometrical models and one-dimensional radiative transfer codes. From our analysis we find that asymmetric circumstellar material is apparent in RY Sgr, may also exist in V CrA, and is possible for V854 Cen. Overall, we find that our observations are consistent with dust forming in clumps ejected randomly around the RCB star so that over time they create a spherically symmetric distribution of dust. However, we conclude that the determination of whether there is a preferred plane of dust ejection must wait until a time series of observations are obtained.
  • SN 2007it is a bright, Type IIP supernova which shows indications of both pre-existing and newly formed dust. The visible photometry shows a bright late-time luminosity, powered by the 0.09 M$_{\sun}$ of $^{56}$Ni present in the ejecta. There is also a sudden drop in optical brightness after day 339, and a corresponding brightening in the IR due to new dust forming in the ejecta. CO and SiO emission, generally thought to be precursors to dust formation, may have been detected in the mid-IR photometry of SN 2007it. The optical spectra show stronger than average [O I] emission lines and weaker than average [Ca II] lines, which may indicate a 16 - 27 M$_{\sun}$ progenitor, on the higher end of expected Type IIP masses. Multi-component [O I] lines are also seen in the optical spectra, most likely caused by an asymmetric blob or a torus of oxygen core material being ejected during the SN explosion. Interaction with circumstellar material prior to day 540 may have created a cool dense shell between the forward and reverse shocks where new dust is condensing. At late times there is also a flattening of the visible lightcurve as the ejecta luminosity fades and a surrounding light echo becomes visible. Radiative transfer models of SN 2007it SEDs indicate that up to 10$^{-4}$ M$_{\sun}$ of new dust has formed in the ejecta, which is consistent with the amount of dust formed in other core collapse supernovae.
  • SN 2007od exhibits characteristics that have rarely been seen in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Optical V band photometry reveals a very steep brightness decline between the plateau and nebular phases of ~4.5 mag, likely due to SN 2007od containing a low mass of 56Ni. The optical spectra show an evolution from normal Type IIP with broad Halpha emission, to a complex, four component Halpha emission profile exhibiting asymmetries caused by dust extinction after day 232. This is similar to the spectral evolution of the Type IIn SN 1998S, although no early-time narrow (~200 km s-1) Halpha component was present in SN 2007od. In both SNe, the intermediate-width Halpha emission components are thought to arise in the interaction between the ejecta and its circumstellar medium (CSM). SN 2007od also shows a mid-IR excess due to new dust. The evolution of the Halpha profile and the presence of the mid-IR excess provide strong evidence that SN 2007od formed new dust before day 232. Late-time observations reveal a flattening of the visible lightcurve. This flattening is a strong indication of the presence of a light echo, which likely accounts for much of the broad, underlying Halpha component seen at late-times. We believe the multi-peaked Halpha emission is consistent with the interaction of the ejecta with a circumstellar ring or torus (for the inner components at \pm1500 km s-1), and a single blob or cloud of circumstellar material out of the plane of the CSM ring (for the outer component at -5000 km s-1). The most probable location for the formation of new dust is in the cool dense shell created by the interaction between the expanding ejecta and its CSM. Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling of the dust emission from SN 2007od implies that up to 4x 10-4Msun of new dust has formed. This is similar to the amounts of dust formed in other CCSNe such as SNe 1999em, 2004et, and 2006jc.
  • We observed six fields of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with the Advanced Camera for Survey on board the Hubble Space Telescope in the F555W and F814W filters. These fields sample regions characterized by very different star and gas densities, and, possibly, by different evolutionary histories. We find that the SMC was already forming stars ~12 Gyr ago, even if the lack of a clear horizontal branch suggests that in the first few billion years the star formation activity was low. Within the uncertainties of our two-band photometry, we find evidence of a radial variation in chemical enrichment, with the SMC outskirts characterized by lower metallicity than the central zones. From our CMDs we also infer that the SMC formed stars over a long interval of time until ~2-3 Gyr ago. After a period of modest activity, star formation increased again in the recent past, especially in the bar and the wing of the SMC, where we see an enhancement in the star-formation activity starting from ~500 Myr ago. The inhomogeneous distribution of stars younger than ~100 Myr indicates that recent star formation has mainly developed locally.
  • As first Paper of a series devoted to study the old stellar population in clusters and fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud, we present deep observations of NGC121 in the F555W and F814W filters, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The resulting color-magnitude diagram reaches ~3.5 mag below the main-sequence turn-off; deeper than any previous data. We derive the age of NGC121 using both absolute and relative age-dating methods. Fitting isochrones in the ACS photometric system to the observed ridge line of NGC121, gives ages of 11.8 +- 0.5 Gyr (Teramo), 11.2 +- 0.5 Gyr (Padova) and 10.5 +- 0.5 Gyr (Dartmouth). The cluster ridge line is best approximated by the alpha-enhanced Dartmouth isochrones. Placing our relative ages on an absolute age scale, we find ages of 10.9 +- 0.5 Gyr (from the magnitude difference between the main-sequence turn-off and the horizontal branch) and 11.5 +- 0.5 Gyr (from the absolute magnitude of the horizontal branch), respectively. These five different age determinations are all lower by 2 - 3 Gyr than the ages of the oldest Galactic globular clusters of comparable metallicity. Therefore we confirm the earlier finding that the oldest globular cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, NGC121, is a few Gyr younger than its oldest counterparts in the Milky Way and in other nearby dwarf galaxies such as the Large Magellanic Cloud, Fornax, and Sagittarius. If it were accreted into the Galactic halo, NGC121 would resemble the ''young halo globulars'', although it is not as young as the youngest globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf. The young age of NGC121 could result from delayed cluster formation in the Small Magellanic Cloud or result from the random survival of only one example of an initially small number star clusters.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of stellar features in the HI tidal bridge connecting M81 and M82 in the region called Arp's Loop. We identify eight young star-forming regions from Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet observations. Four of these objects are also detected at H\alpha. We determine the basic star formation history of Arp's Loop using F475W and F814W images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We find both a young (< 10 Myr) and an old (>1 Gyr) stellar population with a similar spatial distribution and a metallicity Z~0.004. We suggest that the old stellar population was formed in the stellar disk of M82 and/or M81 and ejected into the intergalactic medium during a tidal passage (~ 200-300 Myr ago), whereas the young UV-bright stars have formed in the tidal debris. The UV luminosities of the eight objects are modest and typical of small clusters or OB associations. The tidal bridge between M81-M82 therefore appears to be intermediate between the very low levels of star formation seen in the Magellanic bridge and actively star-forming tidal tails associated with major galaxy mergers.
  • We present observations obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope of the "fossil" starburst region B in the nearby starburst galaxy M82. By comparing UBVI photometry with models, we derive ages and extinctions for 35 U-band selected star clusters. We find that the peak epoch of cluster formation occurred ~ 150 Myr ago, in contrast to earlier work that found a peak formation age of 1.1 Gyr. The difference is most likely due to our inclusion of U-band data, which are essential for accurate age determinations of young cluster populations. We further show that the previously reported turnover in the cluster luminosity function is probably due to the neglect of the effect of extended sources on the detection limit. The much younger cluster ages we derive clarifies the evolution of the M82 starburst. The M82-B age distribution now overlaps with the ages of: the nuclear starburst; clusters formed on the opposite side of the disk; and the last encounter with M81, some 220 Myr ago.
  • We report on recent progress in the modelling of the near-IR spectra of young stellar populations, i.e. populations in which red supergiants (RSGs) are dominant. First, we discuss the determination of fundamental parameters of RSGs using fits to their near-IR spectra with new PHOENIX model spectra; RSG-specific surface abundances are accounted for and effects of the microturbulence parameter are explored. New population synthesis predictions are then described and, as an example, it is shown that the spectra of young star clusters in M82 can be reproduced very well from 0.5 to 2.4 micrometers. We warn of remaining uncertainties in cluster ages.
  • We have obtained deep and wide field imaging of the Coma cluster of galaxies with the CFH12K camera at CFHT in the B, V, R and I filters. In this paper, we present the observations, data reduction, catalogs and first scientific results. We investigated the quality of our data by internal and external literature comparisons. We also checked the realisation of the observational requirements we set. Our observations cover two partially overlapping areas of $42 \times 28$ arcmin$^2$, leading to a total area of 0.72 $\times$ 0.82 deg$^2$. We have produced catalogs of objects that cover a range of more than 10 magnitudes and are complete at the 90% level at B$\sim$25, V$\sim$24, R$\sim$24 and I$\sim$23.5 for stellar-like objects, and at B$\sim$22, V$\sim$21, R$\sim$20.75 and I$\sim$20.5 for faint low-surface-brightness galaxy-like objects. Magnitudes are in good agreement with published values from R$\sim$16 to R$\sim$25. The photometric uncertainties are of the order of 0.1 magnitude at R$\sim$20 and of 0.3 magnitude at R$\sim$25. Astrometry is accurate to 0.5~arcsec and also in good agreement with published data. Our catalog provides a rich dataset that can be mined for years to come to gain new insights into the formation and evolution of the Coma cluster and its galaxy population. As an illustration of the data quality, we examine the bright part of the Colour Magnitude Relation (B-R versus R) derived from the catalog and find that it is in excellent agreement with that derived for galaxies with redshifts in the Coma cluster, and with previous CMRs estimated in the literature.
  • [ABRIDGED] We analyse near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the central starburst region of NGC 1140, obtained at the Gemini-South telescope equipped with CIRPASS. Our ~1.45-1.67 um wavelength coverage includes the bright [Fe II] emission line, as well as high-order Brackett (hydrogen) lines. While strong [Fe II] emission, thought to originate in the thermal shocks associated with supernova remnants, is found throughout the galaxy, both Br 12-4 and Br 14-4 emission, and weak CO(6,3) absorption, is predominantly associated with the northern starburst region. The Brackett lines originate from recombination processes occurring on smaller scales in (young) HII regions. The time-scale associated with strong [Fe II] emission implies that most of the recent star-formation activity in NGC 1140 was induced in the past 35-55 Myr. Based on the spatial distributions of the [Fe II] versus Brackett line emission, we conclude that a galaxy-wide starburst was induced several tens of Myr ago, with more recent starburst activity concentrated around the northern starburst region. This scenario is (provisionally) confirmed by our analysis of the spectral energy distributions of the compact, young massive star clusters (YMCs) detected in new and archival broad-band HST images. The YMC ages in NGC 1140 are all <= 20 Myr, consistent with independently determined estimates of the galaxy's starburst age, while there appears to be an age difference between the northern and southern YMC complexes in the sense expected from our CIRPASS analysis. Our photometric mass estimates of the NGC 1140 YMCs, likely upper limits, are comparable to those of the highest-mass Galactic globular clusters and to spectroscopically confirmed masses of (compact) YMCs in other starburst galaxies.
  • We report the findings of a new search for RR Lyraes in an M31 halo field located 40 arcminutes from the nucleus of the galaxy along the minor axis. We detected 37 variable stars, of which 24 are classified as RR Lyraes and the others are ambiguous. Estimating a completeness fraction of ~24%, we calculate that there are approximately 100 RR Lyraes in the field, which is consistent with what is expected from deep HST color-magnitude diagrams. We calculate a mean magnitude of g=25.15+/ 0.03, which we interpret to mean that the mean metallicity of RR Lyraes is significantly lower than that of the M31 halo as a whole. The presence of ancient, metal-poor stars opens the possibility that, initially, the M31 halo appeared much like the Milky Way halo.
  • We present a measurement of the star formation history of Sextans A, based on WFPC2 photometry that is 50% complete to V=27.5 (M_V ~+ 1.9) and I=27.0. The star formation history and chemical enrichment history have been measured through modeling of the CMD. We find evidence for increased reddening in the youngest stellar populations and an intrinsic metallicity spread at all ages. Sextans A has been actively forming stars at a high rate for ~ 2.5 Gyr ago, with an increased rate beginning ~ 0.1 Gyr ago. We find a non-zero number of stars older than 2.5 Gyr, due to the limited depth of the photometry, a detailed star formation history at intermediate and older ages has considerable uncertainties. The mean metallicity was found to be [M/H] ~- 1.4 over the measured history of the galaxy, with most of the enrichment happening at ages of at least 10 Gyr. We also find that an rms metallicity spread of 0.15 dex at all ages allows the best fits to the observed CMD. We revisit our determination of the recent star formation history (age <= 0.7 Gyr) using BHeB stars and find good agreement for all but the last 25 Myr, a discrepancy resulting primarily from different distances used in the two analyses and the differential extinction in the youngest populations. This indicates that star formation histories determined solely from BHeB stars should be confined to CMD regions where no contamination from reddened MS stars is present.
  • The Wisconsin H Alpha Mapper has been used to set the first deep upper limits on the intensity of diffuse H alpha emission from warm ionized gas in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) Draco and Ursa Minor. Assuming a velocity dispersion of 15 km/s for the ionized gas, we set limits for the H alpha intensity of less or equal to 0.024 Rayleighs and less or equal to 0.021 Rayleighs for the Draco and Ursa Minor dSphs, respectively, averaged over our 1 degree circular beam. Adopting a simple model for the ionized interstellar medium, these limits translate to upper bounds on the mass of ionized gas of approximately less than 10% of the stellar mass, or approximately 10 times the upper limits for the mass of neutral hydrogen. Note that the Draco and Ursa Minor dSphs could contain substantial amounts of interstellar gas, equivalent to all of the gas injected by dying stars since the end of their main star forming episodes more than 8 Gyr in the past, without violating these limits on the mass of ionized gas.
  • We have identified 82 short-period variable stars in Sextans A from deep WFPC2 observations. All of the periodic variables appear to be short-period Cepheids, with periods as small as 0.8 days for fundamental-mode Cepheids and 0.5 days for first-overtone Cepheids. These objects have been used, along with measurements of the RGB tip and red clump, to measure a true distance modulus to Sextans A of (m-M)_0 = 25.61 +/- 0.07, corresponding to a distance of d = 1.32 +/- 0.04 Mpc. Comparing distances calculated by these techniques, we find that short-period Cepheids (P < 2 days) are accurate distance indicators for objects at or below the metallicity of the SMC. As these objects are quite numerous in low-metallicity star-forming galaxies, they have the potential for providing extremely precise distances throughout the Local Group. We have also compared the relative distances produced by other distance indicators. We conclude that calibrations of RR Lyraes, the RGB tip, and the red clump are self-consistent, but that there appears to be a small dependence of long-period Cepheid distances on metallicity. Finally, we present relative distances of Sextans A, Leo A, IC 1613, and the Magellanic Clouds.
  • We present new Near-Infrared (NIR) observations, in the J, H and Kn bands, for a sample of Polar Ring Galaxies (PRGs), selected from the Polar Ring Catalogue (Whitmore et al. 1990). Data were acquired with the CASPIR near-IR camera at the 2.3 m telescope of Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatory. We report here on the detail morphological study for the central host galaxy and the polar structure in all PRGs of our sample. Total magnitudes, bulge-to-disk decomposition and structural parameters are computed for all objects. These data are crucial for an accurate modeling of the stellar population and the estimate of the star formation rates in the two components.
  • This work presents new surface photometry and two-dimensional modeling of the light distribution of the Polar Ring Galaxy NGC 4650A, based on near-infrared (NIR) observations and high resolution optical imaging acquired during the Hubble Heritage program. The NIR and optical integrated colors of the S0 and the polar ring, and their scale parameters, are compared with those for standard galaxy morphological types. The polar structure appears to be a disk of a very young age, while the colors and light distribution of the host galaxy do not resemble that of a typical early-type system. We compare these observational results with the predictions from different formation scenarios for polar ring galaxies. The peculiarities of the central S0 galaxy, the polar disk structure and stellar population ages suggest that the polar ring galaxy NGC 4650A may be the result of a dissipative merger event, rather than of an accretion process.
  • We have measured stellar photometry from deep Cycle 7 Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 imaging of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sextans A. The imaging was taken in three filters: F555W ($V$; 8 orbits), F814W ($I$; 16 orbits), and F656N (H$\alpha$; 1 orbit). Combining these data with Cycle 5 WFPC2 observations provides nearly complete coverage of the optically visible portion of the galaxy. The Cycle 7 observations are nearly 2 magnitudes more sensitive than the Cycle 5 observations, which provides unambiguous separation of the faint blue helium burning stars (BHeB stars) from contaminant populations. The depth of the photometry allows us to compare recent star formation histories recovered from both the main sequence (MS) stars and the BHeB stars for the last 300 Myr. The excellent agreement between these independent star formation rate (SFR) calculations is a resounding confirmation for the legitimacy of using the BHeB stars to calculate the recent SFR. Using the BHeB stars we have calculated the global star formation history over the past 700 Myr. The history calculated from the Cycle 7 data is remarkably identical to that calculated from the Cycle 5 data, implying that both halves of the galaxy formed stars in concert. We have also calculated the spatially resolved star formation history, combining the fields from the Cycle 5 and Cycle 7 data. Our interpretation of the pattern of star formation is that it is an orderly stochastic process.
  • Spectroscopic abundance determinations for stars spanning a Hubble time in age are necessary in order to unambiguously determine the evolutionary histories of galaxies. Using FORS1 in Multi-Object Spectroscopy mode on ANTU (UT1) at the ESO-VLT on Paranal we obtained near infrared spectra from which we measured the equivalent widths of the two strongest Ca II triplet lines to determine metal abundances for a sample of Red Giant Branch stars, selected from ESO-NTT optical (I, V-I) photometry of three nearby, Local Group, galaxies: the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal, the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal and the Dwarf Irregular NGC 6822. The summed equivalent width of the two strongest lines in the Ca II triplet absorption line feature, centered at 8500A, can be readily converted into an [Fe/H] abundance using the previously established calibrations by Armandroff & Da Costa (1991) and Rutledge, Hesser & Stetson (1997). We measured metallicities for 37 stars in Sculptor, 32 stars in Fornax, and 23 stars in NGC 6822, yielding more precise estimates of the metallicity distribution functions for these galaxies than it is possible to obtain photometrically. In the case of NGC 6822, this is the first direct measurement of the abundances of the intermediate-age and old stellar populations. We find metallicity spreads in each galaxy which are broadly consistent with the photometric width of the Red Giant Branch, although the abundances of individual stars do not always appear to correspond to their colour. This is almost certainly predominantly due to a highly variable star formation rate with time in these galaxies, which results in a non-uniform, non-globular-cluster-like, evolution of the Ca/Fe ratio.
  • Using new HST imaging, we identify a large, evolved system of super star clusters in a disk region just outside the starburst core in the prototypical starburst galaxy M82, ``M82 B.'' This region has been suspected to be a fossil starburst site in which an intense episode of star formation occurred over 100 Myr ago, which is now confirmed by our derived age distribution. It suggests steady, continuing cluster formation at a modest rate at early times (> 2 Gyr ago), followed by a concentrated formation episode ~600 Myr ago and more recent suppression of cluster formation. The peak episode coincides with independent dynamical estimates for the last tidal encounter with M81.
  • We present preliminary results from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 investigation of spatial and temporal distributions of star clusters in the clumpy irregular galaxy NGC 7673 and the starburst spirals NGC 3310 and Haro 1. We compare the spectral energy distributions of star clusters in the large clumps in NGC 7673 to model calculations of stellar clusters of various ages. We also propose that the presence of super star clusters in clumps seems to be a feature of intense starbursts.