• The support vector machine (SVM) is a powerful and widely used classification algorithm. This paper uses the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions to provide rigorous mathematical proof for new insights into the behavior of SVM. These insights provide perhaps unexpected relationships between SVM and two other linear classifiers: the mean difference and the maximal data piling direction. For example, we show that in many cases SVM can be viewed as a cropped version of these classifiers. By carefully exploring these connections we show how SVM tuning behavior is affected by characteristics including: balanced vs. unbalanced classes, low vs. high dimension, separable vs. non-separable data. These results provide further insights into tuning SVM via cross-validation by explaining observed pathological behavior and motivating improved cross-validation methodology. Finally, we also provide new results on the geometry of complete data piling directions in high dimensional space.
  • Data science is the business of learning from data, which is traditionally the business of statistics. Data science, however, is often understood as a broader, task-driven and computationally-oriented version of statistics. Both the term data science and the broader idea it conveys have origins in statistics and are a reaction to a narrower view of data analysis. Expanding upon the views of a number of statisticians, this paper encourages a big-tent view of data analysis. We examine how evolving approaches to modern data analysis relate to the existing discipline of statistics (e.g. exploratory analysis, machine learning, reproducibility, computation, communication and the role of theory). Finally, we discuss what these trends mean for the future of statistics by highlighting promising directions for communication, education and research.
  • High dimension low sample size statistical analysis is important in a wide range of applications. In such situations, the highly appealing discrimination method, support vector machine, can be improved to alleviate data piling at the margin. This leads naturally to the development of distance weighted discrimination (DWD), which can be modeled as a second-order cone programming problem and solved by interior-point methods when the scale (in sample size and feature dimension) of the data is moderate. Here, we design a scalable and robust algorithm for solving large scale generalized DWD problems. Numerical experiments on real data sets from the UCI repository demonstrate that our algorithm is highly efficient in solving large scale problems, and sometimes even more efficient than the highly optimized LIBLINEAR and LIBSVM for solving the corresponding SVM problems.
  • The issue of robustness to family relationships in computing genotype ancestry scores such as eigenvector projections has received increased attention in genetic association, as the scores are widely used to control spurious association. We use a motivational example from the North American Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Consortium genetic association study with 3444 individuals and 898 family members to illustrate the challenge of computing ancestry scores when sets of both unrelated individuals and closely-related family members are included. We propose novel methods to obtain ancestry scores and demonstrate that the proposed methods outperform existing methods. The current standard is to compute loadings (left singular vectors) using unrelated individuals and to compute projected scores for remaining family members. However, projected ancestry scores from this approach suffer from shrinkage toward zero. We consider in turn alternate strategies: (i) within-family data orthogonalization, (ii) matrix substitution based on decomposition of a target family-orthogonalized covariance matrix, (iii) covariance-preserving whitening, retaining covariances between unrelated pairs while orthogonalizing family members, and (iv) using family-averaged data to obtain loadings. Except for within-family orthogonalization, our proposed approaches offer similar performance and are superior to the standard approaches. We illustrate the performance via simulation and analysis of the CF dataset.
  • New representations of tree-structured data objects, using ideas from topological data analysis, enable improved statistical analyses of a population of brain artery trees. A number of representations of each data tree arise from persistence diagrams that quantify branching and looping of vessels at multiple scales. Novel approaches to the statistical analysis, through various summaries of the persistence diagrams, lead to heightened correlations with covariates such as age and sex, relative to earlier analyses of this data set. The correlation with age continues to be significant even after controlling for correlations from earlier significant summaries
  • Collaborative forecasting involves exchanging information on how much of an item will be needed by a buyer and how much can be supplied by a seller or manufacturer in a supply chain. This exchange allows parties to plan their operations based on the needs and limitations of their supply chain partner. The success of this system critically depends on the healthy flow of information. This paper focuses on methods to easily analyze and visualize this process. To understand how the information travels on this network and how parties react to new information from their partners, this paper proposes a Gaussian Graphical Model based method, and finds certain inefficiencies in the system. To simplify and better understand the update structure, a Continuum Canonical Correlation based method is proposed. The analytical tools introduced in this article are implemented as a part of a forecasting solution software developed to aid the forecasting practice of a large company.
  • Motivated by the prevalence of high dimensional low sample size datasets in modern statistical applications, we propose a general nonparametric framework, Direction-Projection-Permutation (DiProPerm), for testing high dimensional hypotheses. The method is aimed at rigorous testing of whether lower dimensional visual differences are statistically significant. Theoretical analysis under the non-classical asymptotic regime of dimension going to infinity for fixed sample size reveals that certain natural variations of DiProPerm can have very different behaviors. An empirical power study both confirms the theoretical results and suggests DiProPerm is a powerful test in many settings. Finally DiProPerm is applied to a high dimensional gene expression dataset.
  • Object Oriented Data Analysis is a new area in statistics that studies populations of general data objects. In this article we consider populations of tree-structured objects as our focus of interest. We develop improved analysis tools for data lying in a binary tree space analogous to classical Principal Component Analysis methods in Euclidean space. Our extensions of PCA are analogs of one dimensional subspaces that best fit the data. Previous work was based on the notion of tree-lines. In this paper, a generalization of the previous tree-line notion is proposed: k-tree-lines. Previously proposed tree-lines are k-tree-lines where k=1. New sub-cases of k-tree-lines studied in this work are the 2-tree-lines and tree-curves, which explain much more variation per principal component than tree-lines. The optimal principal component tree-lines were computable in linear time. Because 2-tree-lines and tree-curves are more complex, they are computationally more expensive, but yield improved data analysis results. We provide a comparative study of all these methods on a motivating data set consisting of brain vessel structures of 98 subjects.
  • Sparse Principal Component Analysis (PCA) methods are efficient tools to reduce the dimension (or the number of variables) of complex data. Sparse principal components (PCs) are easier to interpret than conventional PCs, because most loadings are zero. We study the asymptotic properties of these sparse PC directions for scenarios with fixed sample size and increasing dimension (i.e. High Dimension, Low Sample Size (HDLSS)). Under the previously studied spike covariance assumption, we show that Sparse PCA remains consistent under the same large spike condition that was previously established for conventional PCA. Under a broad range of small spike conditions, we find a large set of sparsity assumptions where Sparse PCA is consistent, but PCA is strongly inconsistent. The boundaries of the consistent region are clarified using an oracle result.
  • This study introduces a new method of visualizing complex tree structured objects. The usefulness of this method is illustrated in the context of detecting unexpected features in a data set of very large trees. The major contribution is a novel two-dimensional graphical representation of each tree, with a covariate coded by color. The motivating data set contains three dimensional representations of brain artery systems of 105 subjects. Due to inaccuracies inherent in the medical imaging techniques, issues with the reconstruction algo- rithms and inconsistencies introduced by manual adjustment, various discrepancies are present in the data. The proposed representation enables quick visual detection of the most common discrepancies. For our driving example, this tool led to the modification of 10% of the artery trees and deletion of 6.7%. The benefits of our cleaning method are demonstrated through a statistical hypothesis test on the effects of aging on vessel structure. The data cleaning resulted in improved significance levels.
  • A set of curves or images of similar shape is an increasingly common functional data set collected in the sciences. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is the most widely used technique to decompose variation in functional data. However, the linear modes of variation found by PCA are not always interpretable by the experimenters. In addition, the modes of variation of interest to the experimenter are not always linear. We present in this paper a new analysis of variance for Functional Data. Our method was motivated by decomposing the variation in the data into predetermined and interpretable directions (i.e. modes) of interest. Since some of these modes could be nonlinear, we develop a new defined ratio of sums of squares which takes into account the curvature of the space of variation. We discuss, in the general case, consistency of our estimates of variation, using mathematical tools from differential geometry and shape statistics. We successfully applied our method to a motivating example of biological data. This decomposition allows biologists to compare the prevalence of different genetic tradeoffs in a population and to quantify the effect of selection on evolution.