• Solar and stellar dynamos shed small-scale and large-scale magnetic helicity of opposite signs. However, solar wind observations and simulations have shown that some distance above the dynamo, both the small-scale and large-scale magnetic helicities have reversed signs. With realistic simulations of the solar corona above an active region now being available, we have access to the magnetic field and current density along coronal loops. We show that a sign reversal in the horizontal averages of the magnetic helicity occurs when the local maximum of the plasma beta drops below unity and the field becomes nearly fully force free. Hence, this reversal is expected to occur well within the solar corona and would not directly be accessible to in situ measurements with Parker Solar Probe or SolarOrbiter. We also show that the reversal is associated with subtle changes in the relative dominance of structures with positive and negative magnetic helicity.
  • The emergence of dipolar magnetic features on the solar surface is an idealization. Most of the magnetic flux emergence occurs in complex multipolar regions. Here we show that the surface pattern of magnetic structures alone can reveal the sign of the underlying magnetic helicity in the nearly force-free coronal regions above. The sign of the magnetic helicity can be predicted to good accuracy by considering the three-dimensional position vectors of three spots on the sphere ordered by their relative strengths at the surface and compute from them the skew product. This product, which is a pseudo scalar, is shown to be a good proxy for the sign of the coronal magnetic helicity.
  • We report on two ultrastable lasers each stabilized to independent silicon Fabry-P\'erot cavities operated at 124 K. The fractional frequency instability of each laser is completely determined by the fundamental thermal Brownian noise of the mirror coatings with a flicker noise floor of $4 \times 10^{-17}$ for integration times between 0.8 s and a few tens of seconds. We rigorously treat the notorious divergencies encountered with the associated flicker frequency noise and derive methods to relate this noise to observable and practically relevant linewidths and coherence times. The individual laser linewidth obtained from the phase noise spectrum or the direct beat note between the two lasers can be as small as 5 mHz at 194 THz. From the measured phase evolution between the two laser fields we derive usable phase coherence times for different applications of 11 s and 60 s.
  • This work presents an extensive study of the previously discovered formation of bipolar flux concentrations in a two-layer model. We interpret the formation process in terms of negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI), which is a possible mechanism to explain the origin of sunspots. In our simulations, we use a Cartesian domain of isothermal stratified gas that is divided into two layers. In the lower layer, turbulence is forced with transverse nonhelical random waves, whereas in the upper layer no flow is induced. A weak uniform magnetic field is imposed in the entire domain at all times. In this study we vary the stratification by changing the gravitational acceleration, magnetic Reynolds number, strength of the imposed magnetic field, and size of the domain to investigate their influence on the formation process. Bipolar magnetic structure formation takes place over a large range of parameters. The magnetic structures become more intense for higher stratification until the density contrast becomes around $100$ across the turbulent layer. For the Reynolds numbers considered, magnetic flux concentrations are generated at magnetic Prandtl number between 0.1 and 1. The magnetic field in bipolar regions increases with higher imposed field strength until the field becomes comparable to the equipartition field strength of the turbulence. A larger horizontal extent enables the flux concentrations to become stronger and more coherent. The size of the bipolar structures turns out to be independent of the domain size. In the case of bipolar region formation, we find an exponential growth of the large-scale magnetic field, which is indicative of a hydromagnetic instability. Additionally, the flux concentrations are correlated with strong large-scale downward and converging flows. These findings imply that NEMPI is responsible for magnetic flux concentrations.
  • Solar magnetic activity shows both smooth secular changes, such as the Grand Modern Maximum, and quite abrupt drops that are denoted as Grand Minima. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of convection driven dynamos offer one way of examining the mechanisms behind these events. In this work, we analyze a solution of a solar-like DNS that has been evolved for roughly 80 magnetic cycles of 4.9 years, during which epochs of irregular behavior are detected. The emphasis of our analysis is to find physical causes for such behavior. The DNS employed is a semi-global (wedge) magnetoconvection model. For data analysis we use Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and phase dispersion ($D^2$) methods. A special property of the DNS is the existence of multiple dynamo modes at different depths and latitudes. The dominant mode is solar-like. This mode is accompanied by a higher frequency mode near the surface and a low-frequency mode in the bottom of the convection zone. The overall behavior of the dynamo solution is very complex exhibiting variable cycle lengths, epochs of disturbed and even ceased surface activity, and strong short-term hemispherical asymmetries. Surprisingly, the most prominent suppressed surface activity epoch is actually a global magnetic energy maximum. We interpret the overall irregular behavior to be due to the interplay of the different dynamo modes showing different equatorial symmetries, especially the smoother part of the irregular variations being related to the variations of the mode strengths, evolving with different and variable cycle lengths. The abrupt low activity epoch in the dominant dynamo mode near the surface is related to a strong maximum of the bottom toroidal field strength, which causes abrupt disturbances especially in the differential rotation profile via the suppression of the Reynolds stresses.
  • We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\lvert 5s^{2} \, ^1 \textrm{S}_0 \rangle \,-\, \lvert 5s5p \, ^3 \textrm{P}_1 \rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynamics of the phase dispersion slope is experimentally investigated and the optimal conditions for laser stabilization are established. Our experimental results are compared to state-of-the-art cavity QED theoretical calculations.
  • As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilisation using ultra-stable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the non-linear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here we have constructed such a system and observed non-linear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multi-photon scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intra-cavity power we systematically study this non-linear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub 100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation with ultranarrow clock transitions.
  • Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active; some undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22-year solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the 3D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at 5 times the current solar rotation rate. Striking global-scale magnetic wreaths appear in the midst of the turbulent convection zone and show rich time-dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day time scale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an $\Omega$-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not necessarily well represented by a simple $\alpha$-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate towards the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. The primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which shows variations associated with the poleward propagating magnetic wreaths. In the Sun, similar patterns are observed in the poleward branch of the torsional oscillations, and these may represent poleward propagating magnetic fields deep below the solar surface. [abridged]
  • Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and are very magnetically active. The magnetic fields at their surfaces likely originate in their convective envelopes where convection and rotation can drive strong dynamo action. Here we explore simulations of global-scale stellar convection in rapidly rotating suns using the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. The magnetic fields built in these dynamos are organized on global-scales into wreath-like structures that span the convection zone. We explore one case rotates five times faster than the Sun in detail. This dynamo simulation, called case D5, has repeated quasi-cyclic reversals of global-scale polarity. We compare this case D5 to the broader family of simulations we have been able to explore and discuss how future simulations and observations can advance our understanding of stellar dynamos and magnetism.
  • When stars like our Sun are young they rotate rapidly and are very magnetically active. We explore dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. The magnetic fields built in these dynamos are organized on global-scales into wreath-like structures that span the convection zone. Wreath-building dynamos can undergo quasi-cyclic reversals of polarity and such behavior is common in the parameter space we have been able to explore. These dynamos do not appear to require tachoclines to achieve their spatial or temporal organization. Wreath-building dynamos are present to some degree at all rotation rates, but are most evident in the more rapidly rotating simulations.
  • A theoretical description of the dissociative recombination process for the HCO+ ion suggests that the nonadiabatic Renner-Teller coupling between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom plays an important role. This finding is consistent with a recent study of this process for another closed-shell molecule, the H3+ ion, where Jahn-Teller coupling was shown to generate a relatively high rate. The cross section obtained here for the dissociative recombination of HCO+exhibits encouraging agreement with a merged-beam experiment.
  • We present the constraints on the cosmological parameters obtained with the $E_{\rm peak}$--$E_{\gamma}$ correlation found with the most recent sample of 19 GRBs with spectroscopically measured redshift and well determined prompt emission spectral and afterglow parameters. We compare our results obtained in the two possible uniform jet scenarios, i.e. assuming a homogeneous density profile (HM) or a wind density profile (WM) for the circumburst medium. Better constraints on $\Omega_{M}$ and $\Omega_{\Lambda}$ are obtained with the (tighter) $E_{\rm peak}$--$E_{\gamma}$ correlation derived in the wind density scenario. We explore the improvements to the constraints of the cosmological parameters that could be reached with a large sample, $\sim$ 150 GRBs, in the future. We study the possibility to calibrate the slope of these correlations. Our optimization analysis suggests that $\sim 12$ GRBs with redshift $z\in(0.9,1.1)$ can be used to calibrate the $E_{\rm peak}$--$E_{\gamma}$ with a precision better than 1%. The same precision is expected for the same number of bursts with $z\in(0.45,0.75)$. This result suggests that we do not necessarily need a large sample of low z GRBs for calibrating the slope of these correlations.
  • We have conducted pointed redshift surveys for galaxies in the direction of bright AGN whose HST far-UV spectra contain nearby (cz <~ 30,000 kms), low column density (12.5 <= log N_{HI} (cm s^{-2}) <= 14.5) Ly-alpha forest absorption systems. Here we present results for four lines-of-sight which contain nearby (cz <~ 3000 kms) Ly-alpha absorbers in galaxy voids. Although our data go quite deep (-13 <= M_{B}(limit) <= -14) out to impact parameters of 100-250 h_{70}^{-1} kpc, these absorbers remain isolated and thus appear to be truly intergalactic, rather than part of galaxies or their halos. Since we and others have discovered no galaxies in voids, the only baryons detected in the voids are in the Ly-alpha ``clouds''. Using a photoionization model for these clouds, the total baryonic content of the voids is 4.5% +/- 1.5% of the mean baryon density.
  • In this paper, we use large-angle, nearby galaxy redshift surveys to investigate the relationship between the 81 low-redshift Lya absorbers in our HST/GHRS survey and galaxies, superclusters, and voids. In a subsample of 46 Lya absorbers located in regions where the February 8, 2000 CfA catalog is complete down to at least L* galaxies, the nearest galaxy neighbors range from 100kpc to >10 Mpc. Of these 46 absorbers, 8 are found in galaxy voids. After correcting for pathlength and sensitivity, we find that 22+-8% of the Lya absorbers lie in voids, which requires that at least some low-column density absorbers are not extended halos of individual bright galaxies. The number density of these clouds yields a baryon fraction of 4.5+-1.5% in voids. The stronger Lya absorbers (10^{13.2-15.4} cm^-2) cluster with galaxies more weakly than galaxies cluster with each other, while the weaker absorbers (10^{12.4-13.2} cm^-2) are more randomly distributed. The median distance from a low-z Lya absorber in our sample to its nearest galaxy neighbor (~500 kpc) is twice the median distance between bright galaxies in the same survey volume. This makes any purposed "association" between these Lya absorbers and individual galaxies problematic. The suggested correlation between Lya absorber equivalent width (W) and nearest-galaxy impact parameter does not extend to W<200mA, or to impact parameters >200kpc. Instead, we find statistical support for the contention that absorbers align with large-scale filaments of galaxies. While some strong (W>400mA) Lya absorbers may be gas in the extended gaseous halos of individual galaxies, much of the local Lya "forest" appears to be associated with the large-scale structures of galaxies and some with voids.
  • Of all known persistent stellar-mass black hole candidates, only LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 consistently show spectra that are dominated by a soft, thermal component. We present results from long (170ksec) Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 made in 1996 December. The spectra can be described by a multicolor disk blackbody plus an additional high-energy power-law. Even though the spectra are very soft (Gamma is about 2.5), RXTE detected a significant signal from LMC X-3 up to energies of 50keV, the hardest energy at which the object was ever detected. Focusing on LMC X-3, we present results from the first year of an ongoing monitoring campaign with RXTE which started in 1997 January. We show that the appearance of the object changes considerably over its ~200d long cycle. This variability can either be explained by periodic changes in the mass transfer rate or by a precessing accretion disk analogous to Her X-1.
  • I present a study of the X-ray spectral properties of a sample containing 24 type-1 active galactic nuclei using the medium spectral resolution of ``ASCA''. The sample consists of 20 radio-quiet objects and 4 radio-loud objects. A simple power-law continuum absorbed by Galactic material provides a very poor description of the spectra of most objects. Deviations from the power-law form are interpreted in terms of X-ray reprocessing/absorption processes. In particular, at least half of the objects show K-shell absorption edges of warm oxygen (O vii and O viii) characteristic of optically-thin, photoionized material along the line-of-sight to the central engine, the so-called warm absorber. It is found that objects with significant optical reddening display deep O vii edges. Coupled with other evidence, this suggests the existence of dusty warm plasma. A radiatively driven outflow originating from the molecular torus is probably the source of this plasma. Rapid variability of the warm absorber also points to there being another component closer to the central source and probably situated within the broad line region. Spectral features at energies characteristic of cold fluorescent iron K$\alpha$ emission are common. Radio-quiet objects have iron emission well described as originating from either the inner regions of an accretion disk or, in a small number of cases, from the molecular torus. Two of the radio-loud objects (3C~120 and 3C~382) have a much broader feature which presents problems for the relativistic disk model. The presence of radio-jets may be important in forming this spectral feature.