• We investigate six supernova remnant (SNR) candidates --- G51.21+0.11, G52.37-0.70, G53.07+0.49, G53.41+0.03, G53.84-0.75, and the possible shell around G54.1-0.3 --- in the Galactic Plane using newly acquired LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) High-Band Antenna (HBA) observations, as well as archival Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Very Large Array Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) mosaics. We find that G52.37-0.70, G53.84-0.75, and the possible shell around pulsar wind nebula G54.1+0.3 are unlikely to be SNRs, while G53.07+0.49 remains a candidate SNR. G51.21+0.11 has a spectral index of $\alpha=-0.7\pm0.21$, but lacks X-ray observations and as such requires further investigation to confirm its nature. We confirm one candidate, G53.41+0.03, as a new SNR because it has a shell-like morphology, a radio spectral index of $\alpha=-0.6\pm0.2$ and it has the X-ray spectral characteristics of a 1000-8000 year old SNR. The X-ray analysis was performed using archival XMM-Newton observations, which show that G53.41+0.03 has strong emission lines and is best characterized by a non-equilibrium ionization model, consistent with an SNR interpretation. Deep Arecibo radio telescope searches for a pulsar associated with G53.41+0.03 resulted in no detection, but place stringent upper limits on the flux density of such a source if it is beamed towards Earth.
  • The origin of the asymmetric supernova remnant (SNR) W49B has been a matter of debate: is it produced by a rare jet-driven core-collapse supernova, or by a normal supernova that is strongly shaped by its dense environment? Aiming to uncover the explosion mechanism and origin of the asymmetric, centrally filled X-ray morphology of W49B, we have performed spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy and a search for potential point sources. We report new candidate point sources inside W49B. The Chandra X-ray spectra from W49B are well-characterized by two-temperature gas components ($\sim 0.27$ keV + 0.6--2.2 keV). The hot component gas shows a large temperature gradient from the northeast to the southwest and is over-ionized in most regions with recombination timescales of 1--$10\times 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$ s. The Fe element shows strong lateral distribution in the SNR east, while the distribution of Si, S, Ar, Ca is relatively smooth and nearly axially symmetric. Asymmetric Type-Ia explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf well-explains the abundance ratios and metal distribution of W49B, whereas a jet-driven explosion and normal core-collapse models fail to describe the abundance ratios and large masses of iron-group elements. A model based on a multi-spot ignition of the white dwarf can explain the observed high $M_{\rm Mn}/M_{\rm Cr}$ value (0.8--2.2). The bar-like morphology is mainly due to a density enhancement in the center, given the good spatial correlation between gas density and X-ray brightness. The recombination ages and the Sedov age consistently suggest a revised SNR age of 5--6 kyr. This study suggests that despite the presence of candidate point sources projected within the boundary of this SNR, W49B is likely a Type-Ia SNR, which suggests that Type-Ia supernovae can also result in mixed-morphology SNRs.
  • We present the results of Suzaku and Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J1053.7+5453 ($z=0.0704$), which contains a radio relic. The radio relic is located at the distance of $\sim 540$ kpc from the X-ray peak toward the west. We measured the temperature of this cluster for the first time. The resultant temperature in the center is $ \sim 1.3$ keV, which is lower than the value expected from the X-ray luminosity - temperature and the velocity dispersion - temperature relation. Though we did not find a significant temperature jump at the outer edge of the relic, our results suggest that the temperature decreases outward across the relic. Assuming the existence of the shock at the relic, its Mach number becomes $M \simeq 1.4 $. A possible spatial variation of Mach number along the relic is suggested. Additionally, a sharp surface brightness edge is found at the distance of $\sim 160$ kpc from the X-ray peak toward the west in the Chandra image. We performed X-ray spectral and surface brightness analyses around the edge with Suzaku and Chandra data, respectively. The obtained surface brightness and temperature profiles suggest that this edge is not a shock but likely a cold front. Alternatively, it cannot be ruled out that thermal pressure is really discontinuous across the edge. In this case, if the pressure across the surface brightness edge is in equilibrium, other forms of pressure sources, such as cosmic-rays, are necessary. We searched for the non-thermal inverse Compton component in the relic region. Assuming the photon index $ \Gamma = 2.0$, the resultant upper limit of the flux is $1.9 \times 10^{-14} {\rm erg \ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}}$ for $4.50 \times 10^{-3} {\rm \ deg^{2}}$ area in the 0.3-10 keV band, which implies that the lower limit of magnetic field strength becomes $ 0.7 {\rm \ \mu G}$.
  • The chemical yields of supernovae and the metal enrichment of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) are not well understood. This paper introduces the CHEmical Enrichment RGS Sample (CHEERS), which is a sample of 44 bright local giant ellipticals, groups and clusters of galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. This paper focuses on the abundance measurements of O and Fe using the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS). The deep exposures and the size of the sample allow us to quantify the intrinsic scatter and the systematic uncertainties in the abundances using spectral modeling techniques. We report the oxygen and iron abundances as measured with RGS in the core regions of all objects in the sample. We do not find a significant trend of O/Fe as a function of cluster temperature, but we do find an intrinsic scatter in the O and Fe abundances from cluster to cluster. The level of systematic uncertainties in the O/Fe ratio is estimated to be around 20-30%, while the systematic uncertainties in the absolute O and Fe abundances can be as high as 50% in extreme cases. We were able to identify and correct a systematic bias in the oxygen abundance determination, which was due to an inaccuracy in the spectral model. The lack of dependence of O/Fe on temperature suggests that the enrichment of the ICM does not depend on cluster mass and that most of the enrichment likely took place before the ICM was formed. We find that the observed scatter in the O/Fe ratio is due to a combination of intrinsic scatter in the source and systematic uncertainties in the spectral fitting, which we are unable to disentangle. The astrophysical source of intrinsic scatter could be due to differences in AGN activity and ongoing star formation in the BCG. The systematic scatter is due to uncertainties in the spatial line broadening, absorption column, multi-temperature structure and the thermal plasma models. (Abbreviated).
  • Supernova 1604 is the last Galactic supernova for which historical records exist. Johannes Kepler's name is attached to it, as he published a detailed account of the observations made by himself and European colleagues. Supernova 1604 was very likely a Type Ia supernova, which exploded 350 pc to 750 pc above the Galactic plane. Its supernova remnant, known as Kepler's supernova remnant, shows clear evidence for interaction with nitrogen-rich material in the north/northwest part of the remnant, which, given the height above the Galactic plane, must find its origin in mass loss from the supernova progenitor system. The combination of a Type Ia supernova and the presence of circumstellar material makes Kepler's supernova remnant a unique object to study the origin of Type Ia supernovae. The evidence suggests that the progenitor binary system of supernova 1604 consisted of a carbon- oxygen white dwarf and an evolved companion star, which most likely was in the (post) asymptotic giant branch of its evolution. A problem with this scenario is that the companion star must have survived the explosion, but no trace of its existence has yet been found, despite a deep search. 1 Introduction; 2 The supernova remnant, its distance and multiwavelength properties; 2.1 Position, distance estimates and SN1604 as a runaway system; 2.2 X-ray imaging spectroscopy and SN1604 as a Type Ia supernova 2.3 The circumstellar medium as studied in the optical and infrared; 3 The dynamics of Kepler's SNR; 3.1 Velocity measurements; 3.2 Hydrodynamical simulations; 4 The progenitor system of SN 1604; 4.1 Elevated circumstellar nitrogen abundances, silicates and a single degenerate scenario for SN1604; 4.2 Problems with a single degenerate Type Ia scenario for SN 1604; 4.3 Was SN 1604 a core-degenerate Type Ia explosion?; 4.4 What can we learn from the historical light curve of SN 1604? ; 5 Conclusions
  • Didier Barret, Thien Lam Trong, Jan-Willem den Herder, Luigi Piro, Xavier Barcons, Juhani Huovelin, Richard Kelley, J. Miguel Mas-Hesse, Kazuhisa Mitsuda, Stéphane Paltani, Gregor Rauw, Agata Rożanska, Joern Wilms, Marco Barbera, Enrico Bozzo, Maria Teresa Ceballos, Ivan Charles, Anne Decourchelle, Roland den Hartog, Jean-Marc Duval, Fabrizio Fiore, Flavio Gatti, Andrea Goldwurm, Brian Jackson, Peter Jonker, Caroline Kilbourne, Claudio Macculi, Mariano Mendez, Silvano Molendi, Piotr Orleanski, François Pajot, Etienne Pointecouteau, Frederick Porter, Gabriel W. Pratt, Damien Prêle, Laurent Ravera, Etienne Renotte, Joop Schaye, Keisuke Shinozaki, Luca Valenziano, Jacco Vink, Natalie Webb, Noriko Yamasaki, Françoise Delcelier-Douchin, Michel Le Du, Jean-Michel Mesnager, Alice Pradines, Graziella Branduardi-Raymont, Mauro Dadina, Alexis Finoguenov, Yasushi Fukazawa, Agnieszka Janiuk, Jon Miller, Yaël Nazé, Fabrizio Nicastro, Salvatore Sciortino, Jose Miguel Torrejon, Hervé Geoffray, Isabelle Hernandez, Laure Luno, Philippe Peille, Jérôme André, Christophe Daniel, Christophe Etcheverry, Emilie Gloaguen, Jérémie Hassin, Gilles Hervet, Irwin Maussang, Jérôme Moueza, Alexis Paillet, Bruno Vella, Gonzalo Campos Garrido, Jean-Charles Damery, Chantal Panem, Johan Panh, Simon Bandler, Jean-Marc Biffi, Kevin Boyce, Antoine Clénet, Michael DiPirro, Pierre Jamotton, Simone Lotti, Denis Schwander, Stephen Smith, Bert-Joost van Leeuwen, Henk van Weers, Thorsten Brand, Beatriz Cobo, Thomas Dauser, Jelle de Plaa, Edoardo Cucchetti
    The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena) will provide spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy from 0.2 to 12 keV, with 5 arc second pixels over a field of view of 5 arc minute equivalent diameter and a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV up to 7 keV. In this paper, we first review the core scientific objectives of Athena, driving the main performance parameters of the X-IFU, namely the spectral resolution, the field of view, the effective area, the count rate capabilities, the instrumental background. We also illustrate the breakthrough potential of the X-IFU for some observatory science goals. Then we briefly describe the X-IFU design as defined at the time of the mission consolidation review concluded in May 2016, and report on its predicted performance. Finally, we discuss some options to improve the instrument performance while not increasing its complexity and resource demands (e.g. count rate capability, spectral resolution). The X-IFU will be provided by an international consortium led by France, The Netherlands and Italy, with further ESA member state contributions from Belgium, Finland, Germany, Poland, Spain, Switzerland and two international partners from the United States and Japan.
  • The hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is rich in metals, which are synthesised by supernovae (SNe) and accumulate over time into the deep gravitational potential well of clusters of galaxies. Since most of the elements visible in X-rays are formed by type Ia (SNIa) and/or core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae, measuring their abundances gives us direct information on the nucleosynthesis products of billions of SNe since the epoch of the star formation peak (z~2-3). In this study, we compare the most accurate average X/Fe abundance ratios (compiled in a previous work from XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS observations of 44 galaxy clusters, groups, and ellipticals), representative of the chemical enrichment in the nearby ICM, to various SNIa and SNcc nucleosynthesis models found in the literature. The use of a SNcc model combined to any favoured standard SNIa model (deflagration or delayed-detonation) fails to reproduce our abundance pattern. In particular, the Ca/Fe and Ni/Fe ratios are significantly underestimated by the models. We show that the Ca/Fe ratio can be reproduced better, either by taking a SNIa delayed-detonation model that matches the observations of the Tycho supernova remnant, or by adding a contribution from the Ca-rich gap transient SNe, whose material should easily mix into the hot ICM. On the other hand, the Ni/Fe ratio can be reproduced better by assuming that both deflagration and delayed-detonation SNIa contribute in similar proportions to the ICM enrichment. In either case, the fraction of SNIa over the total number of SNe (SNIa+SNcc) contributing to the ICM enrichment ranges within 29-45%. This fraction is found to be systematically higher than the corresponding SNIa/SNe fraction contributing to the enrichment of the proto-solar environnement (15-25%). We also discuss and quantify two useful constraints on both SNIa and SNcc that can be inferred from the ICM abundance ratios.
  • Based on the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006 and our newly developed spatially resolved spectroscopy tools (Paper~I), we study the thermal emission from ISM and ejecta of SN1006 by analyzing the spectra extracted from 583 tessellated regions dominated by thermal emission. With some key improvements in spectral analysis as compared to Paper~I, we obtain much better spectral fitting results with less residuals. The spatial distributions of the thermal and ionization states of the ISM and ejecta show different features, which are consistent with a scenario that the ISM (ejecta) is heated and ionized by the forward (reverse) shock propagating outward (inward). Different elements have different spatial distributions and origins, with Ne mostly from the ISM, Si and S from the ejecta, and O and Mg from both ISM and ejecta. Fe L-shell lines are only detected in a small shell-like region SE to the center of SN1006, indicating that most of the Fe-rich ejecta has not yet or just recently been reached by the reverse shock. The overall ejecta abundance patterns for most of the heavy elements, except for Fe and sometimes S, are consistent with typical Type~Ia SN products. The NW half of the SNR interior probably represents a region with turbulently mixed ISM and ejecta, so has enhanced emission from O, Mg, Si, S, lower ejecta temperature, and a large diversity of ionization age. In addition to the asymmetric ISM distribution, an asymmetric explosion of the progenitor star is also needed to explain the asymmetric ejecta distribution.
  • Based on our newly developed methods and the XMM-Newton large program of SN1006, we extract and analyze the spectra from 3596 tessellated regions of this SNR each with 0.3-8 keV counts $>10^4$. For the first time, we map out multiple physical parameters, such as the temperature ($kT$), electron density ($n_e$), ionization parameter ($n_et$), ionization age ($t_{ion}$), metal abundances, as well as the radio-to-X-ray slope ($\alpha$) and cutoff frequency ($\nu_{cutoff}$) of the synchrotron emission. We construct probability distribution functions of $kT$ and $n_et$, and model them with several Gaussians, in order to characterize the average thermal and ionization states of such an extended source. We construct equivalent width (EW) maps based on continuum interpolation with the spectral model of each regions. We then compare the EW maps of OVII, OVIII, OVII K$\delta-\zeta$, Ne, Mg, SiXIII, SiXIV, and S lines constructed with this method to those constructed with linear interpolation. We further extract spectra from larger regions to confirm the features revealed by parameter and EW maps, which are often not directly detectable on X-ray intensity images. For example, O abundance is consistent with solar across the SNR, except for a low-abundance hole in the center. This "O Hole" has enhanced OVII K$\delta-\zeta$ and Fe emissions, indicating recently reverse shocked ejecta, but also has the highest $n_et$, indicating forward shocked ISM. Therefore, a multi-temperature model is needed to decompose these components. The asymmetric metal distributions suggest there is either an asymmetric explosion of the SN or an asymmetric distribution of the ISM.
  • Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature, or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide simple relations for the minimal amount of equilibration to expect. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the the shock. This assumption results in an analytic treatment of electron-ion equilibration that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low Mach numbers ($<2$) the electrons and ions are close to equilibration, whereas for Mach numbers above $M \sim 60$ the electron-ion temperature ratio scales with the particle masses $T_e/T_i = m_e/m_i$. In between these two extremes the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as $T_e/T_i \propto 1/M_s^2$. This relation also hold if adiabatic compression of the electrons is taken into account. For magnetised plasmas the compression is governed by the magnetosonic Mach number, whereas the electron-ion temperatures are governed by the sonic Mach number. The derived equations are in agreement with observational data at low Mach numbers, but for supernova remnants the relation requires that the inferred Mach numbers for the observations are over- estimated, perhaps as a result of upstream heating in the cosmic-ray precursor. In addition to predicting a minimal electron/ion temperature ratio, we also heuristically incorporate ion-electron heat exchange at the shock, quantified with a dimensionless parameter ${\xi}$. Comparing the model to existing observations in the solar system and supernova remnants suggests that the data are best described by ${\xi} \sim 5$ percent. (Abridged abstract.)
  • Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations, we show that the efficiency of cosmic-ray (CR) production at supernova remnants (SNRs) is over-predicted if it could be estimated based on proper motion measurements of H$\alpha$ filaments in combination with shock-jump conditions. Density fluctuations of upstream medium make shock waves rippled and oblique almost everywhere. The kinetic energy of the shock wave is transferred into that of downstream turbulence as well as thermal energy which is related to the shock velocity component normal to the shock surface. Our synthetic observation shows that the CR acceleration efficiency as estimated from a lower downstream plasma temperature, is overestimated by 10-40%, because rippled shock does not immediately dissipate all upstream kinetic energy.
  • We present the results of a detailed investigation of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 86 using the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. RCW 86 is the probable remnant of SN 185 A.D, a supernova that likely exploded inside a wind-blown cavity. We use the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) to derive precise temperatures and ionization ages of the plasma, which are an indication of the interaction history of the remnant with the presumed cavity. We find that the spectra are well fitted by two non-equilibrium ionization models, which enables us to constrain the properties of the ejecta and interstellar matter plasma. Furthermore, we performed a principal component analysis on EPIC MOS and pn data to find regions with particular spectral properties. We present evidence that the shocked ejecta, emitting Fe-K and Si line emission, are confined to a shell of approximately 2 pc width with an oblate spheroidal morphology. Using detailed hydrodynamical simulations, we show that general dynamical and emission properties at different portions of the remnant can be well-reproduced by a type Ia supernova that exploded in a non-spherically symmetric wind-blown cavity. We also show that this cavity can be created using general wind properties for a single degenerate system. Our data and simulations provide further evidence that RCW 86 is indeed the remnant of SN 185, and is the likely result of a type Ia explosion of single degenerate origin.
  • One of the key observables for determining the progenitor nature of Type Ia supernovae is provided by their immediate circumstellar medium, which according to several models should be shaped by the progenitor binary system. So far, X-ray and radio observations indicate that the surroundings are very tenuous, producing severe upper-limits on the mass loss from winds of the progenitors. In this study, we perform numerical hydro-dynamical simulations of the interaction of the SN ejecta with circumstellar structures formed by possible mass outflows from the progenitor systems and we estimate numerically the expected numerical X-ray luminosity. We consider two kinds of circumstellar structures: a) A circumstellar medium formed by the donor star's stellar wind, in case of a symbiotic binary progenitor system; b) A circumstellar medium shaped by the interaction of the slow wind of the donor star with consecutive nova outbursts for the case of a symbiotic recurrent nova progenitor system. For the hydro-simulations we used well-known Type Ia supernova explosion models, as well as an approximation based on a power law model for the density structure of the outer ejecta. We confirm the strict upper limits on stellar wind mass loss, provided by simplified interpretations of X-ray upper limits of Type Ia supernovae. However, we show that supernova explosions going off in the cavities created by repeated nova explosions, provide a possible explanation for the lack of X-ray emission from supernovae originating from symbiotic binaries. Moreover, the velocity structure of circumstellar medium, shaped by a series of nova explosion matches well with the Na absorption features seen in absorption toward several Type Ia supernovae.
  • This White Paper, submitted to the recent ESA call for science themes to define its future large missions, advocates the need for a transformational leap in our understanding of two key questions in astrophysics: 1) How does ordinary matter assemble into the large scale structures that we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe? Hot gas in clusters, groups and the intergalactic medium dominates the baryonic content of the local Universe. To understand the astrophysical processes responsible for the formation and assembly of these large structures, it is necessary to measure their physical properties and evolution. This requires spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy with a factor 10 increase in both telescope throughput and spatial resolving power compared to currently planned facilities. Feedback from supermassive black holes is an essential ingredient in this process and in most galaxy evolution models, but it is not well understood. X-ray observations can uniquely reveal the mechanisms launching winds close to black holes and determine the coupling of the energy and matter flows on larger scales. Due to the effects of feedback, a complete understanding of galaxy evolution requires knowledge of the obscured growth of supermassive black holes through cosmic time, out to the redshifts where the first galaxies form. X-ray emission is the most reliable way to reveal accreting black holes, but deep survey speed must improve by a factor ~100 over current facilities to perform a full census into the early Universe. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena+) mission provides the necessary performance (e.g. angular resolution, spectral resolution, survey grasp) to address these questions and revolutionize our understanding of the Hot and Energetic Universe. These capabilities will also provide a powerful observatory to be used in all areas of astrophysics.
  • Aims: We want to probe the physics of fast collision-less shocks in supernova remnants. In particular, we are interested in the non-equilibration of temperatures and particle acceleration. Specifically, we aim to measure the oxygen temperature with regards to the electron temperature. In addition, we search for synchrotron emission in the northwestern thermal rim. Methods: This study is part of a dedicated deep observational project of SN 1006 using XMM-Newton, which provides us with currently the best resolution spectra of the bright northwestern oxygen knot. We aim to use the reflection grating spectrometer to measure the thermal broadening of the O vii line triplet by convolving the emission profile of the remnant with the response matrix. Results: The line broadening was measured to be {\sigma}_e = 2.4 \pm 0.3 eV, corresponding to an oxygen temperature of 275$^{+72}_{-63}$ keV. From the EPIC spectra we obtain an electron temperature of 1.35 \pm 0.10 keV. The difference in temperature between the species provides further evidence of non-equilibration of temperatures in a shock. In addition, we find evidence for a bow shock that emits X-ray synchrotron radiation, which is at odds with the general idea that due to the magnetic field orientation only in the NE and SW region X-ray synchrotron radiation should be emitted. We find an unusual H{\alpha} and X-ray synchrotron geometry, in that the H{\alpha} emission peaks downstream of the synchrotron emission. This may be an indication for a peculiar H{\alpha} shock, in which the density is lower and neutral fraction are higher than in other supernova remnants, resulting in a peak in H{\alpha} emission further downstream of the shock.
  • The origin of cosmic rays holds still many mysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmic rays. For this conference devoted to the Astronomical Institute Utrecht I put the emphasis on work that was done in my group, but placed in a broader context: efficient cosmic-ray acceleration and the im- plications for cosmic-ray escape, synchrotron radiation and the evidence for magnetic- field amplification, potential X-ray synchrotron emission from cosmic-ray precursors, and I conclude with the implications of cosmic-ray escape for a Type Ia remnant like Tycho and a core-collapse remnant like Cas A.
  • RX J0720.4-3125 is the most peculiar object among a group of seven isolated X-ray pulsars (the so-called "Magnificent Seven"), since it shows long-term variations of its spectral and temporal properties on time scales of years. This behaviour was explained by different authors either by free precession (with a seven or fourteen years period) or possibly a glitch that occurred around $\mathrm{MJD=52866\pm73 days}$. We analysed our most recent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations in order to further monitor the behaviour of this neutron star. With the new data sets, the timing behaviour of RX J0720.4-3125 suggests a single (sudden) event (e.g. a glitch) rather than a cyclic pattern as expected by free precession. The spectral parameters changed significantly around the proposed glitch time, but more gradual variations occurred already before the (putative) event. Since $\mathrm{MJD\approx53000 days}$ the spectra indicate a very slow cooling by $\sim$2 eV over 7 years.
  • Supernova remnants are beautiful astronomical objects that are also of high scientific interest, because they provide insights into supernova explosion mechanisms, and because they are the likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. X-ray observations are an important means to study these objects.And in particular the advances made in X-ray imaging spectroscopy over the last two decades has greatly increased our knowledge about supernova remnants. It has made it possible to map the products of fresh nucleosynthesis, and resulted in the identification of regions near shock fronts that emit X-ray synchrotron radiation. In this text all the relevant aspects of X-ray emission from supernova remnants are reviewed and put into the context of supernova explosion properties and the physics and evolution of supernova remnants. The first half of this review has a more tutorial style and discusses the basics of supernova remnant physics and thermal and non-thermal X-ray emission. The second half offers a review of the recent advances.The topics addressed there are core collapse and thermonuclear supernova remnants, SN 1987A, mature supernova remnants, mixed-morphology remnants, including a discussion of the recent finding of overionization in some of them, and finally X-ray synchrotron radiation and its consequences for particle acceleration and magnetic fields.
  • The thermal evolution of isothermal neutron stars is studied with matter both in the hadronic phase as well as in the mixed phase of hadronic matter and strange quark matter. In our models, the dominant early-stage cooling process is neutrino emission via the direct Urca process. As a consequence, the cooling curves fall too fast compared to observations. However, when superfluidity is included, the cooling of the neutron stars is significantly slowed down. Furthermore, we find that the cooling curves are not very sensitive to the precise details of the mixing between the hadronic phase and the quark phase and also of the pairing that leads to superfluidity.
  • We co-added the available XMM-Newton RGS spectra for each of the isolated X-ray pulsars RX\,J0720.4$-$3125, RX\,J1308.6+2127 (RBS\,1223), RX\,J1605.3+3249 and RX\,J1856.4$-$3754 (four members of the "Magnificent Seven") and the "Three Musketeers" Geminga, PSR\,B0656+14 and PSR\,B1055-52. We confirm the detection of a narrow absorption feature at 0.57 keV in the co-added RGS spectra of RX\,J0720.4$-$3125 and RX\,J1605.3+3249 (including most recent observations). In addition we found similar absorption features in the spectra of RX\,J1308.6+2127 (at 0.53 keV) and maybe PSR\,B1055-52 (at 0.56 keV). The absorption feature in the spectra of RX\,J1308.6+2127 is broader than the feature e.g. in RX\,J0720.4$-$3125. The narrow absorption features are detected with 2$\sigma$ to 5.6$\sigma$ significance. Although very bright and frequently observed, there are no absorption features visible in the spectra of RX\,J1856.4$-$3754 and PSR\,B0656+14, while the co-added XMM-Newton RGS spectrum of Geminga has not enough counts to detect such a feature. We discuss a possible origin of these absorption features as lines caused by the presence of highly ionised oxygen (in particular OVII and/or OVI at 0.57 keV) in the interstellar medium and absorption in the neutron star atmosphere, namely the absorption features at 0.57 keV as gravitational redshifted ($g_{r}$=1.17) OVIII.
  • We present a model for the Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) of SN 1604, also known as Kepler's SNR. We find that its main features can be explained by a progenitor model of a symbiotic binary consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB donor star with an initial mass of 4-5 M_sun. The slow, nitrogen rich wind emanating from the donor star has partially been accreted by the white dwarf, but has also created a circumstellar bubble. Based on observational evidence, we assume that the system moves with a velocity of 250 km/s. Due to the systemic motion the interaction between the wind and the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, which can explain the presence of a one-sided, nitrogen rich shell. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of both the shell formation and the SNR evolution. The SNR simulations show good agreement with the observed kinematic and morphological properties of Kepler's SNR. Specifically, the model reproduces the observed expansion parameters (m=V/(R/t)) of m=0.35 in the north and m=0.6 in the south of Kepler's SNR. We discuss the variations among our hydrodynamical simulations in light of the observations, and show that part of the blast wave may have traversed through the one-sided shell completely. The simulations suggest a distance to Kepler's SNR of 6 kpc, or otherwise require that SN 1604 was a sub-energetic Type Ia explosion. Finally, we discuss the possible implications of our model for Type Ia supernovae and their remnants in general.
  • We present new Chandra ACIS-S3 observations of Cassiopeia A which, when combined with earlier ACIS-S3 observations, show evidence for a steady ~ 1.5-2%/yr decline in the 4.2-6.0 keV X-ray emission between the years 2000 and 2010. The computed flux from exposure corrected images over the entire remnant showed a 17% decline over the entire remnant and a slightly larger (21%) decline from regions along the remnant's western limb. Spectral fits of the 4.2-6.0 keV emission across the entire remnant, forward shock filaments, and interior filaments indicate the remnant's nonthermal spectral powerlaw index has steepened by about 10%, with interior filaments having steeper powerlaw indices. Since TeV electrons, which give rise to the observed X-ray synchrotron emission, are associated with the exponential cutoff portion of the electron distribution function, we have related our results to a change in the cutoff energy and conclude that the observed decline and steepening of the nonthermal X-ray emission is consistent with a deceleration of the remnant's ~5000 km/s forward shock of ~10--40 km/s/yr
  • The physics of the coolest phases in the hot Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) of clusters of galaxies is yet to be fully unveiled. X-ray cavities blown by the central Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) contain enough energy to heat the surrounding gas and stop cooling, but locally blobs or filaments of gas appear to be able to cool to low temperatures of 10^4 K. In X-rays, however, gas with temperatures lower than 0.5 keV is not observed. Using a deep XMM-Newton observation of the cluster of galaxies Abell 2052, we derive 2D maps of the temperature, entropy, and iron abundance in the core region. About 130 kpc South-West of the central galaxy, we discover a discontinuity in the surface brightness of the hot gas which is consistent with a cold front. Interestingly, the iron abundance jumps from ~0.75 to ~0.5 across the front. In a smaller region to the North-West of the central galaxy we find a relatively high contribution of cool 0.5 keV gas, but no X-ray emitting gas is detected below that temperature. However, the region appears to be associated with much cooler H-alpha filaments in the optical waveband. The elliptical shape of the cold front in the SW of the cluster suggests that the front is caused by sloshing of the hot gas in the clusters gravitational potential. This effect is probably an important mechanism to transport metals from the core region to the outer parts of the cluster. The smooth temperature profile across the sharp jump in the metalicity indicates the presence of heat conduction and the lack of mixing across the discontinuity. The cool blob of gas NW of the central galaxy was probably pushed away from the core and squeezed by the adjacent bubble, where it can cool efficiently and relatively undisturbed by the AGN. Shock induced mixing between the two phases may cause the 0.5 keV gas to cool non-radiatively and explain our non-detection of gas below 0.5 keV.
  • A promising source of the positrons that contribute through annihilation to the diffuse Galactic 511keV emission is the beta-decay of unstable nuclei like 56Ni and 44Ti synthesised by massive stars and supernovae. Although a large fraction of these positrons annihilate in the ejecta of SNe/SNRs, no point-source of annihilation radiation appears in the INTEGRAL/SPI map of the 511keV emission. We exploit the absence of detectable annihilation emission from young local SNe/SNRs to derive constraints on the transport of MeV positrons inside SN/SNR ejecta and their escape into the CSM/ISM, both aspects being crucial to the understanding of the observed Galactic 511keV emission. We simulated 511keV lightcurves resulting from the annihilation of the decay positrons of 56Ni and 44Ti in SNe/SNRs and their surroundings using a simple model. We computed specific 511keV lightcurves for Cas A, Tycho, Kepler, SN1006, G1.9+0.3 and SN1987A, and compared these to the upper-limits derived from INTEGRAL/SPI observations. The predicted 511keV signals from positrons annihilating in the ejecta are below the sensitivity of the SPI instrument by several orders of magnitude, but the predicted 511keV signals for positrons escaping the ejecta and annihilating in the surrounding medium allowed to derive upper-limits on the positron escape fraction of ~13% for Cas A, ~12% for Tycho, ~30% for Kepler and ~33% for SN1006. The transport of ~MeV positrons inside SNe/SNRs cannot be constrained from current observations of the 511keV emission from these objects, but the limits obtained on their escape fraction are consistent with a nucleosynthesis origin of the positrons that give rise to the diffuse Galactic 511keV emission.
  • We present an analysis of the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray data of the young Type Ia supernova remnant 0519-69.0 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We used data from both the Chandra ACIS and XMM-Newton EPIC-MOS instruments, and high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. The Chandra data show that there is a radial stratification of oxygen, intermediate mass elements and iron, with the emission from more massive elements more toward the center. Using a deprojection technique we measure a forward shock radius of 4.0(3) pc and a reverse shock radius of 2.7(4) pc. We took the observed stratification of the shocked ejecta into account in the modeling of the X-ray spectra with multi-component NEI models, with the components corresponding to layers dominated by one or two elements. An additional component was added in order to represent the ISM, which mostly contributed to the continuum emission. This model fits the data well, and was also employed to characterize the spectra of distinct regions extracted from the Chandra data. From our spectral analysis we find that the fractional masses of shocked ejecta for the most abundant elements are: M(O)=32%, M(Si/S)=7%/5%, M(Ar+Ca)=1%, and M(Fe) = 55%. From the continuum component we derive a circumstellar density of nH= 2.4(2)/cm^3. This density, together with the measurements of the forward and reverse shock radii suggest an age of 450+/-200 yr,somewhat lower than, but consistent with the estimate based on the optical light echo (600+/-200 yr). From the RGS spectra we measured a Doppler broadening of sigma=1873+/-50 km/s, from implying a forward shock velocity of vS = 2770+/-500 km/s. We discuss the results in the context of single degenerate explosion models, using semi-analytical and numerical modeling, and compare the characteristics of 0519-69.0 with those of other Type Ia supernova remnants.