• Cyclic sedimentation has varied at several timescales and this variability has been geologically well documented at Milankovitch timescales, controlled in part by climatically (insolation) driven sea-level changes. At the longer (tens of Myr) timescales connection between astronomical parameters and sedimentation via cyclic solar-system motions within the Milky Way has also been proposed, but this hypothesis remains controversial because of the lack of long geological records. The absence of a physical mechanism that could explain the connection between climate and astronomy at these longer timescales led to the explanation of plate motions as the main driver of climate on Earth. Here we statistically show a prominent and persistent ~36 Myr sedimentary cyclicity superimposed on two megacycles (~250 Myr) in a relatively well-constrained sea-level (SL) record of the past 542 Myr (Phanerozoic eon). Given the possible link between amplitudes of the ~36 and ~250 Myr cyclicities in SL record and the potential that these periodicities fall into the frequency band of solar system motions, we suggest an astronomical origin, and model these periodicities as originating from the path of the solar system in the Milky Way as vertical and radial periods that modulate the flux of cosmic rays on Earth. Our finding of the ~36 Myr SL cyclicity lends credibility to the existing hypothesis about the imprint of solar-system vertical period on the geological record. The ~250 Myr megacycles are tentatively attributed to a radial period. However, the tectonic drivers also remain potentially plausible. The potential existence of a correlation between the modeled astronomical signal and the geological record may offer an indirect proxy to understand the structure and history of the Milky Way by providing a 542 Myr long record of the path of the Sun in our Galaxy.
  • Oceanic tides are a major source of tidal dissipation. They drive the evolution of planetary systems and the rotational dynamics of planets. However, 2D models commonly used for the Earth cannot be applied to extrasolar telluric planets hosting potentially deep oceans because they ignore the three-dimensional effects related to the ocean vertical structure. Our goal is to investigate in a consistant way the importance of the contribution of internal gravity waves in the oceanic tidal response and to propose a modeling allowing to treat a wide range of cases from shallow to deep oceans. A 3D ab initio model is developed to study the dynamics of a global planetary ocean. This model takes into account compressibility, stratification and sphericity terms, which are usually ignored in 2D approaches. An analytic solution is computed and used to study the dependence of the tidal response on the tidal frequency and on the ocean depth and stratification. In the 2D asymptotic limit, we recover the frequency-resonant behaviour due to surface inertial-gravity waves identified by early studies. As the ocean depth and Brunt-V\"ais\"al\"a frequency increase, the contribution of internal gravity waves grows in importance and the tidal response become three-dimensional. In the case of deep oceans, the stable stratification induces resonances that can increase the tidal dissipation rate by several orders of magnitude. It is thus able to affect significantly the evolution time scale of the planetary rotation.
  • Semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tides are important for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone of their host stars. With solid tides, they torque these planets, thus contributing to determine their rotation states as well as their climate. Given the complex dynamics of thermal tides, analytical models are essential to understand its dependence on the structure and rotation of planetary atmospheres and the tidal frequency. In this context, the state of the art model proposed in the 60's by Lindzen and Chapman explains well the properties of thermal tides in the asymptotic regime of Earth-like rapid rotators but predicts a non-physical diverging tidal torque in the vicinity of the spin-orbit synchronization. In this work, we present a new model that addresses this issue by taking into account dissipative processes through a Newtonian cooling. First, we recover the tidal torque recently obtained with numerical simulations using General Circulation Models (GCM). Second, we show that the tidal response is very sensitive to the atmospheric structure, particularly to the stability with respect to convection. A strong stable stratification is able to annihilate the atmospheric tidal torque, leading to synchronization, while a convective atmosphere will be submitted to a strong torque, leading to a non-synchronized rotation state.
  • (in english): Urbain-Jean-Joseph Le Verrier was born in Saint-L\^o on March 11, 1811. He entered the Ecole Polytechnique in 1831, from which he was to emerge 8th two years later. After first devoting himself to chemistry, in 1836 he obtained a position as an astronomy assistant at the Ecole Polytechnique. This choice will decide his future career which culminates with the discovery of Neptune in 1846. Le Verrier wrote more than 200 contributions in the Comptes Rendus de l'Acad\'emie des Sciences. These contributions are very varied: some original articles but also reports on publications published elsewhere, sometimes even simple notes of a single page. The whole set gives a very vivid vision of the development of the science of the XIXth century. At that time, the Comptes Rendus are really a reflection of the debates of the sessions of the Academy. They are published very quickly, and leave a large freedom of speech to the authors. They are therefore a snapshot of the sometimes lively polemics which animated the sessions of the Academy of Sciences. In this limited essay, we will look to the first years of the career of Le Verrier until the discovery of Neptune. (in french) Le Verrier a \'ecrit plus de 200 contributions dans les Comptes Rendus de l'Acad\'emie des Sciences . Ces contributions sont le reflet des d\'ebats des s\'eances de l'Acad\'emie. Ils sont publi\'es tr\`es rapidement, et laissent une tr\`es grande libert\'e de parole aux auteurs. On y retrouve de mani\`ere instantan\'ee les pol\'emiques parfois vives qui ont anim\'e les s\'eances de l'Acad\'emie des sciences. Dans cet essai nous survolerons les premi\`eres ann\'ees de la carri\`ere de Le Verrier jusqu'\`a la d\'ecouverte de Neptune.
  • Thermal atmospheric tides can torque telluric planets away from spin-orbit synchronous rotation, as observed in the case of Venus. They thus participate to determine the possible climates and general circulations of the atmospheres of these planets. In this work, we write the equations governing the dynamics of thermal tides in a local vertically-stratified section of a rotating planetary atmosphere by taking into account the effects of the complete Coriolis acceleration on tidal waves. This allows us to derive analytically the tidal torque and the tidally dissipated energy, which we use to discuss the possible regimes of tidal dissipation and examine the key role played by stratification. In agreement with early studies, we find that the frequency dependence of the thermal atmospheric tidal torque in the vicinity of synchronization can be approximated by a Maxwell model. This behaviour corresponds to weakly stably stratified or convective fluid layers, as observed in ADLM2016a. A strong stable stratification allows gravity waves to propagate, which makes the tidal torque become negligible. The transition is continuous between these two regimes. The traditional approximation appears to be valid in thin atmospheres and in regimes where the rotation frequency is dominated by the forcing or the buoyancy frequencies. Depending on the stability of their atmospheres with respect to convection, observed exoplanets can be tidally driven toward synchronous or asynchronous final rotation rates. The domain of applicability of the traditional approximation is rigorously constrained by calculations.
  • Atmospheric tides can have a strong impact on the rotational dynamics of planets. They are of most importance for terrestrial planets located in the habitable zone of their host star, where their competition with solid tides is likely to drive the body towards non-synchronized rotation states of equilibrium, as observed in the case of Venus. Contrary to other planetary layers, the atmosphere is sensitive to both gravitational and thermal forcings, through a complex dynamical coupling involving the effects of Coriolis acceleration and characteristics of the atmospheric structure. These key physics are usually not taken into account in modelings used to compute the evolution of planetary systems, where tides are described with parametrised prescriptions. In this work, we present a new ab initio modeling of atmospheric tides adapting the theory of the Earth's atmospheric tides (Chapman & Lindzen 1970) to other terrestrial planets. We derive analytic expressions of the tidal torque, as a function of the tidal frequency and parameters characterizing the internal structure (e.g. the Brunt-V\"ais\"al\"a frequency, the radiative frequency, the pressure heigh scale). We show that stratification plays a key role, the tidal torque being strong in the case of convective atmospheres (i.e. with a neutral stratification) and weak in case of atmosphere convectively stable. In a second step, the model is used to determine the non-synchronized rotation states of equilibrium of Venus-like planets as functions of the physical parameters of the system. These results are detailed in Auclair-Desrotour et al. (2017a) and Auclair-Desrotour et al. (2017b).
  • The AMD-stability criterion allows to discriminate between a-priori stable planetary systems and systems for which the stability is not granted and needs further investigations. AMD-stability is based on the conservation of the Angular Momentum Deficit (AMD) in the averaged system at all orders of averaging. While the AMD criterion is rigorous, the conservation of the AMD is only granted in absence of mean-motion resonances (MMR). Here we extend the AMD-stability criterion to take into account mean-motion resonances, and more specifically the overlap of first order MMR. If the MMR islands overlap, the system will experience generalized chaos leading to instability. The Hamiltonian of two massive planets on coplanar quasi-circular orbits can be reduced to an integrable one degree of freedom problem for period ratios close to a first order MMR. We use the reduced Hamiltonian to derive a new overlap criterion for first order MMR. This stability criterion unifies the previous criteria proposed in the literature and admits the criteria obtained for initially circular and eccentric orbits as limit cases. We then improve the definition of AMD-stability to take into account the short term chaos generated by MMR overlap. We analyze the outcome of this improved definition of AMD-stability on selected multi-planet systems from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopeadia.
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • When a light scalar field with gravitational strength interacts with matter, the weak equivalence principle is in general violated, leading for instance to a violation of the universality of free fall. This has been known and tested for a while. However, recent developments [Minazzoli & Hees, PRD 2016] showed that a novel manifestation of the universality of free fall can appear in some models. Here we discuss this new scenario and expose how we intend to constrain it with INPOP ephemeris.
  • We present here in full detail the evolution of the angular momentum deficit (AMD) during collisions as it was described in (Laskar, PRL,2000). Since then, the AMD has been revealed to be a key parameter for the understanding of the outcome of planetary formation models. We define here the AMD-stability criterion that can be easily verified on a newly discovered planetary system. We show how AMD-stability can be used to establish a classification of the multiplanet systems in order to exhibit the planetary systems that are long-term stable because they are AMD-stable, and those that are AMD-unstable which then require some additional dynamical studies to conclude on their stability. The AMD-stability classification is applied to the 131 multiplanet systems from The Extrasolar Planet Encyclopaedia database (exoplanet.eu) for which the orbital elements are sufficiently well known.
  • In some planetary systems, the orbital periods of two of its members present a commensurability, usually known by mean-motion resonance. These resonances greatly enhance the mutual gravitational influence of the planets. As a consequence, these systems present uncommon behaviors, and their motions need to be studied with specific methods. Some features are unique and allow us a better understanding and characterization of these systems. Moreover, mean-motion resonances are a result of an early migration of the orbits in an accretion disk, so it is possible to derive constraints on their formation. Here we review the dynamics of a pair of resonant planets and explain how their orbits evolve in time. We apply our results to the HD 45365 planetary system.
  • Over short time intervals planetary ephemerides have been traditionally represented in analytical form as finite sums of periodic terms or sums of Poisson terms that are periodic terms with polynomial amplitudes. Nevertheless, this representation is not well adapted for the evolution of the planetary orbits in the solar system over million of years as they present drifts in their main frequencies, due to the chaotic nature of their dynamics. The aim of the present paper is to develop a numerical algorithm for slowly diffusing solutions of a perturbed integrable Hamiltonian system that will apply to the representation of the chaotic planetary motions with varying frequencies. By simple analytical considerations, we first argue that it is possible to recover exactly a single varying frequency. Then, a function basis involving time-dependent fundamental frequencies is formulated in a semi-analytical way. Finally, starting from a numerical solution, a recursive algorithm is used to numerically decompose the solution on the significant elements of the function basis. Simple examples show that this algorithm can be used to give compact representations of different types of slowly diffusing solutions. As a test example, we show how this algorithm can be successfully applied to obtain a very compact approximation of the La2004 solution of the orbital motion of the Earth over 40 Myr ([-35Myr,5Myr]). This example has been chosen as this solution is widely used for the reconstruction of the climates of the past.
  • In this paper, we present a formalism designed to model tidal interaction with a viscoelastic body made of Maxwell material. Our approach remains regular for any spin rate and orientation, and for any orbital configuration including high eccentricities and close encounters. The method is to integrate simultaneously the rotation and the position of the planet as well as its deformation. We provide the equations of motion both in the body frame and in the inertial frame. With this study, we generalize preexisting models to the spatial case and to arbitrary multipole orders using a formalism taken from quantum theory. We also provide the vectorial expression of the secular tidal torque expanded in Fourier series. Applying this model to close-in exoplanets, we observe that if the relaxation time is longer than the revolution period, the phase space of the system is characterized by the presence of several spin-orbit resonances, even in the circular case. As the system evolves, the planet spin can visit different spin-orbit configurations. The obliquity is decreasing along most of these resonances, but we observe a case where the planet tilt is instead growing. These conclusions derived from the secular torque are successfully tested with numerical integrations of the instantaneous equations of motion on HD 80606b. Our formalism is also well adapted to close-in super-Earths in multiplanet systems which are known to have non-zero mutual inclinations.
  • Andoyer variables are well known for the study of rotational dynamics. These variables were derived by Andoyer through a procedure that can be also used to obtain the Hill variables of the Kepler problem. Andoyer construction can also forecast the Delaunay variables which canonicity is then obtained without the use of a generating function.
  • The competition between the torques induced by solid and thermal tides drives the rotational dynamics of Venus-like planets and super-Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of low-mass stars. The tidal responses of the atmosphere and telluric core are related to their respective physical properties and strongly depend on the tidal frequency. The resulting torque determines the possible equilibrium states of the planet's spin. We compute here an analytic expression for the total tidal torque exerted on a Venus-like planet. This expression is used to characterize the equilibrium rotation of the body. Close to the star, the solid tide dominates. Far from it, the thermal tide drives the rotational dynamics of the planet. The transition regime corresponds to the habitable zone, where prograde and retrograde equilibrium states appear. We demonstrate the strong impact of the atmospheric properties and of the rheology of the solid part on the rotational dynamics of Venus-like planets, highlighting the key role played by dissipative mechanisms in the stability of equilibrium configurations.
  • Atmospheric tides can strongly affect the rotational dynamics of planets. In the family of Earth-like planets, such as Venus, this physical mechanism coupled with solid tides makes the angular velocity evolve over long timescales and determines the equilibrium configurations of their spin. Contrary to the solid core, the atmosphere is submitted to both tidal gravitational potential and insolation flux coming from the star. The complex response of the gas is intrinsically linked to its physical properties. This dependence has to be characterized and quantified to study the large variety of extrasolar planetary systems. We develop a theoretical global model where radiative losses, which are predominant in slowly rotating atmospheres, are taken into account. We analytically compute the tidal perturbation of pressure, density, temperature and velocity field from which we deduce the expressions of atmospheric Love numbers and tidal torque exerted by the star. The dynamics of atmospheric tides depends on the frequency regime of the tidal perturbation: the thermal regime near synchronization and the dynamical regime characterizing fast-rotating planets. The dependence of the torque on the tidal frequency is quantified for Earth-like and Venus-like exoplanets and is in good agreement with the results given by Global Climate Models (GCM) simulations. Introducing dissipative processes such as radiation regularizes the tidal response of the atmosphere, otherwise it is singular at synchronization. We demonstrate the important role played by the physical and dynamical properties of a super-Earth atmosphere (e.g. Coriolis, stratification, background pressure, density, temperature, radiative emission) and point out the key parameters defining tidal regimes (e.g. inertia, Brunt-V\"ais\"al\"a, radiative frequencies, tidal frequency) and characterize the behaviour of the fluid shell with dissipation.
  • We present a novel approach for analysing radial velocity data that combines two features: all the planets are searched at once and the algorithm is fast. This is achieved by utilizing compressed sensing techniques, which are modified to be compatible with the Gaussian processes framework. The resulting tool can be used like a Lomb-Scargle periodogram and has the same aspect but with much fewer peaks due to aliasing. The method is applied to five systems with published radial velocity data sets: HD 69830, HD 10180, 55 Cnc, GJ 876 and a simulated very active star. The results are fully compatible with previous analysis, though obtained more straightforwardly. We further show that 55 Cnc e and f could have been respectively detected and suspected in early measurements from the Lick observatory and Hobby-Eberly Telescope available in 2004, and that frequencies due to dynamical interactions in GJ 876 can be seen.
  • We investigate the secular dynamics of three-body circumbinary systems under the effect of tides. We use the octupolar non-restricted approximation for the orbital interactions, general relativity corrections, the quadrupolar approximation for the spins, and the viscous linear model for tides. We derive the averaged equations of motion in a simplified vectorial formalism, which is suitable to model the long-term evolution of a wide variety of circumbinary systems in very eccentric and inclined orbits. In particular, this vectorial approach can be used to derive constraints for tidal migration, capture in Cassini states, and stellar spin-orbit misalignment. We show that circumbinary planets with initial arbitrary orbital inclination can become coplanar through a secular resonance between the precession of the orbit and the precession of the spin of one of the stars. We also show that circumbinary systems for which the pericenter of the inner orbit is initially in libration present chaotic motion for the spins and for the eccentricity of the outer orbit. Because our model is valid for the non-restricted problem, it can also be applied to any three-body hierarchical system such as star-planet-satellite systems and triple stellar systems.
  • In this brief communication we provide the rationale for, and the outcome of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) resolution vote at the XXIX-th General Assembly in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 2015, on recommended nominal conversion constants for selected solar and planetary properties. The problem addressed by the resolution is a lack of established conversion constants between solar and planetary values and SI units: a missing standard has caused a proliferation of solar values (e.g., solar radius, solar irradiance, solar luminosity, solar effective temperature and solar mass parameter) in the literature, with cited solar values typically based on best estimates at the time of paper writing. As precision of observations increases, a set of consistent values becomes increasingly important. To address this, an IAU Working Group on Nominal Units for Stellar and Planetary Astronomy formed in 2011, uniting experts from the solar, stellar, planetary, exoplanetary and fundamental astronomy, as well as from general standards fields to converge on optimal values for nominal conversion constants. The effort resulted in the IAU 2015 Resolution B3, passed at the IAU General Assembly by a large majority. The resolution recommends the use of nominal solar and planetary values, which are by definition exact and are expressed in SI units. These nominal values should be understood as conversion factors only, not as the true solar/planetary properties or current best estimates. Authors and journal editors are urged to join in using the standard values set forth by this resolution in future work and publications to help minimize further confusion.
  • We present new splitting methods designed for the numerical integration of near-integrable Hamiltonian systems, and in particular for planetary N-body problems, when one is interested in very accurate results over a large time span. We derive in a systematic way an independent set of necessary and sufficient conditions to be satisfied by the coefficients of splitting methods to achieve a prescribed order of accuracy. Splitting methods satisfying such (generalized) order conditions are appropriate in particular for the numerical simulation of the Solar System described in Jacobi coordinates. We show that, when using Poincar\'e Heliocentric coordinates, the same order of accuracy may be obtained by imposing an additional polynomial equation on the coefficients of the splitting method. We construct several splitting methods appropriate for each of the two sets of coordinates by solving the corresponding systems of polynomial equations and finding the optimal solutions. The experiments reported here indicate that the efficiency of our new schemes is clearly superior to previous integrators when high accuracy is required.
  • Paper in honour of Michel Henon, based on a talk presented at Institut Henri Poincare, Paris, 5 Decembre 2013.
  • In this paper we present a new approach to tidal theory. Assuming a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology, we compute the instantaneous deformation of celestial bodies using a differential equation for the gravity field coefficients. This method allows large eccentricities and it is not limited to quasi-periodic perturbations. It can take into account an extended class of perturbations, including chaotic motions and transient events. We apply our model to some already detected eccentric hot Jupiters and super-Earths in planar configurations. We show that when the relaxation time of the deformation is larger than the orbital period, spin-orbit equilibria arise naturally at half-integers of the mean motion, even for gaseous planets. In the case of super-Earths, these equilibria can be maintained for very low values of eccentricity. Our method can also be used to study planets with complex internal structures and other rheologies.
  • Planets with masses between 0.1 - 10 M_earth are believed to host dense atmospheres. These atmospheres can play an important role on the planet's spin evolution, since thermal atmospheric tides, driven by the host star, may counterbalance gravitational tides. In this work we study the long-term spin evolution of Earth-sized exoplanets. We generalize previous works by including the effect of eccentric orbits and obliquity. We show that under the effect of tides and core-mantle friction, the obliquity of the planets evolve either to 0 or 180 degrees. The rotation of these planets is also expected to evolve into a very restricted number of equilibrium configurations. In general, none of this equilibria is synchronous with the orbital mean motion. The role of thermal atmospheric tides becomes more important for Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of their systems, so they cannot be neglected when we search for their potential habitability.
  • The current knowledge of Mercury orbit has mainly been gained by direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and by five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity tests of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (beta and gamma?) are more stringent than previous results.
  • We present a highly scalable algorithm for multiplying sparse multivariate polynomials represented in a distributed format. This algo- rithm targets not only the shared memory multicore computers, but also computers clusters or specialized hardware attached to a host computer, such as graphics processing units or many-core coprocessors. The scal- ability on the large number of cores is ensured by the lacks of synchro- nizations, locks and false-sharing during the main parallel step.