• High-mass star forming regions are typically thought to be dominated by supersonic motions. We present combined Very Large Array and Green Bank Telescope (VLA+GBT) observations of NH$_3$ (1,1) and (2,2) in the infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G035.39-00.33, tracing cold and dense gas down to scales of 0.07 pc. We find that, in contrast to previous similar studies of IRDCs, more than a third of the fitted ammonia spectra show subsonic non-thermal motions (mean line width of 0.71 $\mathrm{km~s^{-1}}$), and the sonic Mach number distribution peaks around $\mathcal{M} = 1$. As possible observational and instrumental biases would only broaden the line profiles, our results provide strong upper limits to the actual value of $\mathcal{M}$, further strengthening our findings of narrow line widths. This finding calls for a reevaluation of the role of turbulent dissipation and subsonic regions in massive-star and cluster formation. Based on our findings in G035.39, we further speculate that the coarser spectral resolution used in the previous VLA NH$_3$ studies may have inhibited the detection of subsonic turbulence in IRDCs. The reduced turbulent support suggests that dynamically important magnetic fields of the 1 mG order would be required to support against possible gravitational collapse. Our results offer valuable input into the theories and simulations that aim to recreate the initial conditions of high-mass star and cluster formation.
  • Towards the pre-stellar core L1544, the methanol (CH$_3$OH) emission forms an asymmetric ring around the core centre, where CH$_3$OH is mostly in solid form, with a clear peak 4000~au to the north-east of the dust continuum peak. As part of the NOEMA Large Project SOLIS (Seeds of Life in Space), the CH$_3$OH peak has been spatially resolved to study its kinematics and physical structure and to investigate the cause behind the local enhancement. We find that methanol emission is distributed in a ridge parallel to the main axis of the dense core. The centroid velocity increases by about 0.2~km~s$^{-1}$ and the velocity dispersion increases from subsonic to transonic towards the central zone of the core, where the velocity field also shows complex structure. This could be indication of gentle accretion of material onto the core or interaction of two filaments, producing a slow shock. We measure the rotational temperature and show that methanol is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) only close to the dust peak, where it is significantly depleted. The CH$_3$OH column density, $N_{tot}({\rm CH_3OH})$, profile has been derived with non-LTE radiative transfer modelling and compared with chemical models of a static core. The measured $N_{tot}({\rm CH_3OH})$ profile is consistent with model predictions, but the total column densities are one order of magnitude lower than those predicted by models, suggesting that the efficiency of reactive desorption or atomic hydrogen tunnelling adopted in the model may be overestimated; or that an evolutionary model is needed to better reproduce methanol abundance.
  • We report ALMA observations with resolution $\approx0.5$" at 3 mm of the extended Sgr B2 cloud in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). We detect 271 compact sources, most of which are smaller than 5000 AU. By ruling out alternative possibilities, we conclude that these sources consist of a mix of hypercompact HII regions and young stellar objects (YSOs). Most of the newly-detected sources are YSOs with gas envelopes which, based on their luminosities, must contain objects with stellar masses $M_*\gtrsim8$ M$_\odot$. Their spatial distribution spread over a $\sim12\times3$ pc region demonstrates that Sgr B2 is experiencing an extended star formation event, not just an isolated `starburst' within the protocluster regions. Using this new sample, we examine star formation thresholds and surface density relations in Sgr B2. While all of the YSOs reside in regions of high column density ($N(H_2)\gtrsim2\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$), not all regions of high column density contain YSOs. The observed column density threshold for star formation is substantially higher than that in solar vicinity clouds, implying either that high-mass star formation requires a higher column density or that any star formation threshold in the CMZ must be higher than in nearby clouds. The relation between the surface density of gas and stars is incompatible with extrapolations from local clouds, and instead stellar densities in Sgr B2 follow a linear $\Sigma_*-\Sigma_{gas}$ relation, shallower than that observed in local clouds. Together, these points suggest that a higher volume density threshold is required to explain star formation in CMZ clouds.
  • We use Green Bank Ammonia Survey observations of NH$_3$ (1,1) and (2,2) emission with 32'' FWHM resolution from a ~ 10 pc$^{2}$ portion of the Cepheus-L1251 molecular cloud to identify hierarchical dense gas structures. Our dendrogram analysis of the NH$_3$ data results in 22 top-level structures, which reside within 13 lower-level, parent structures. The structures are compact (0.01 pc $\lesssim R_{eff} \lesssim$ 0.1 pc) and are spatially correlated with the highest H$_2$ column density portions of the cloud. We also compare the ammonia data to a catalog of dense cores identified by higher-resolution (18.2'' FWHM) Herschel Space Observatory observations of dust continuum emission from Cepheus-L1251. Maps of kinetic gas temperature, velocity dispersion, and NH$_3$ column density, derived from detailed modeling of the NH$_3$ data, are used to investigate the stability and chemistry of the ammonia-identified and Herschel-identified structures. We show that the dust and dense gas in the structures have similar temperatures, with median $T_{dust}$ and $T_K$ measurements of 11.7 $\pm$ 1.1 K and 10.3 $\pm$ 2.0 K, respectively. Based on a virial analysis, we find that the ammonia-identified structures are gravitationally dominated, yet may be in or near a state of virial equilibrium. Meanwhile, the majority of the Herschel-identified dense cores appear to be not bound by their own gravity and instead confined by external pressure. CCS $(2_0-1_0)$ and HC$_5$N $(9-8)$ emission from the region reveal broader line widths and centroid velocity offsets when compared to the NH$_3$ (1,1) emission in some cases, likely due to these carbon-based molecules tracing the turbulent outer layers of the dense cores.
  • We use CARMA 3mm continuum and molecular lines (NH2D, N2H+, HCO+, HCN and CS) at ~1000 au resolution to characterize the structure and kinematics of the envelope surrounding the deeply embedded first core candidate Per-Bolo 58. The line profile of the observed species shows two distinct peaks separated by 0.4-0.6 km/s, most likely arising from two different optically thin velocity components rather than the product of self-absorption in an optically thick line. The two velocity components, each with a mass of ~0.5-0.6 Msun, overlap spatially at the position of the continuum emission, and produce a general gradient along the outflow direction. We investigate whether these observations are consistent with infall in a turbulent and magnetized envelope. We compare the morphology and spectra of the N2H+(1-0) with synthetic observations of an MHD simulation that considers the collapse of an isolated core that is initially perturbed with a turbulent field. The proposed model matches the data in the production of two velocity components, traced by the isolated hyperfine line of the N2H+(1-0) spectra and shows a general agreement in morphology and velocity field. We also use large maps of the region to compare the kinematics of the core with that of the surrounding large-scale filamentary structure and find that accretion from the large-scale filament could also explain the complex kinematics exhibited by this young dense core.
  • We present the results of Very Large Array NH$_{3}$ $(J,K)=(1,1)$ and $(2,2)$ observations of the HH 111/HH 121 protostellar system. HH 111, with a spectacular collimated optical jet, is one of the most well-known Herbig-Haro objects. We report the detection of a new source (NH$_{3}-$S) in the vicinity of HH 111/HH 121 ($\sim$0.03 pc from the HH 111 jet source) in two epochs of the ammonia observations. This constitutes the first detection of this source, in a region which has been thoroughly covered previously by both continuum and spectral line interferometric observations. We study the kinematic and physical properties of HH 111 and the newly discovered NH$_{3}-$S. We also use HCO$^{+}$ and HCN $(J=4-3)$ data obtained with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and archival Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array $^{13}$CO, $^{12}$CO, and C$^{18}$O $(J=2-1)$, N$_2$D$^{+}$ $(J=3-2)$, and $^{13}$CS $(J=5-4)$ data to gain insight into the nature of NH$_{3}-$S. The chemical structure of NH$_3-$S shows evidence for "selective freeze-out", an inherent characteristic of dense cold cores. The inner part of NH$_3-$S shows subsonic non-thermal velocity dispersions indicating a "coherent core", while they increase in the direction of the jets. Archival near- to far-infrared data show no indication of any embedded source in NH$_3-$S. The properties of NH$_3-$S and its location in the infrared dark cloud suggest that it is a starless core located in a turbulent medium with turbulence induced by Herbig-Haro jets and associated outflows. More data is needed to fully understand the physical and chemical properties of NH$_3-$S and if/how its evolution is affected by nearby jets.
  • We use gas temperature and velocity dispersion data from the Green Bank Ammonia Survey and core masses and sizes from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Survey to estimate the virial states of dense cores within the Orion A molecular cloud. Surprisingly, we find that almost none of the dense cores are sufficiently massive to be bound when considering only the balance between self-gravity and the thermal and non-thermal motions present in the dense gas. Including the additional pressure binding imposed by the weight of the ambient molecular cloud material and additional smaller pressure terms, however, suggests that most of the dense cores are pressure confined.
  • We present new Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of CO(2-1) outflows toward young, embedded protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud as part of the Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES) survey. For 57 Perseus protostars, we characterize the orientation of the outflow angles and compare them with the orientation of the local filaments as derived from $Herschel$ observations. We find that the relative angles between outflows and filaments are inconsistent with purely parallel or purely perpendicular distributions. Instead, the observed distribution of outflow-filament angles are more consistent with either randomly aligned angles or a mix of projected parallel and perpendicular angles. A mix of parallel and perpendicular angles requires perpendicular alignment to be more common by a factor of $\sim$3. Our results show that the observed distributions probably hold regardless of the protostar's multiplicity, age, or the host core's opacity. These observations indicate that the angular momentum axis of a protostar may be independent of the large-scale structure. We discuss the significance of independent protostellar rotation axes in the general picture of filament-based star formation.
  • Aims. Infrared dark clouds represent the earliest stages of high-mass star formation. Detailed observations of their physical conditions on all physical scales are required to improve our understanding of their role in fueling star formation. Methods. We investigate the large-scale structure of the IRDC G035.39-00.33, probing the dense gas with the classical ammonia thermometer. This allows us to put reliable constraints on the temperature of the extended, pc-scale dense gas reservoir and to probe the magnitude of its non-thermal motions. Available far-infrared observations can be used in tandem with the observed ammonia emission to estimate the total gas mass contained in G035.39-00.33. Results. We identify a main velocity component as a prominent filament, manifested as an ammonia emission intensity ridge spanning more than 6 pc, consistent with the previous studies on the Northern part of the cloud. A number of additional line-of-sight components are found, and a large scale, linear velocity gradient of ~0.2 km s$^{-1}$ pc$^{-1}$ is found along the ridge of the IRDC. In contrast to the dust temperature map, an ammonia-derived kinetic temperature map, presented for the entirety of the cloud, reveals local temperature enhancements towards the massive protostellar cores. We show that without properly accounting for the line of sight contamination, the dust temperature is 2-3 K larger than the gas temperature measured with NH$_3$. Conclusions. While both the large scale kinematics and temperature structure are consistent with that of starless dark filaments, the kinetic gas temperature profile on smaller scales is suggestive of tracing the heating mechanism coincident with the locations of massive protostellar cores.
  • We present an overview of the first data release (DR1) and first-look science from the Green Bank Ammonia Survey (GAS). GAS is a Large Program at the Green Bank Telescope to map all Gould Belt star-forming regions with $A_V \gtrsim 7$ mag visible from the northern hemisphere in emission from NH$_3$ and other key molecular tracers. This first release includes the data for four regions in Gould Belt clouds: B18 in Taurus, NGC 1333 in Perseus, L1688 in Ophiuchus, and Orion A North in Orion. We compare the NH$_3$ emission to dust continuum emission from Herschel, and find that the two tracers correspond closely. NH$_3$ is present in over 60\% of lines-of-sight with $A_V \gtrsim 7$ mag in three of the four DR1 regions, in agreement with expectations from previous observations. The sole exception is B18, where NH$_3$ is detected toward ~ 40\% of lines-of-sight with $A_V \gtrsim 7$ mag. Moreover, we find that the NH$_3$ emission is generally extended beyond the typical 0.1 pc length scales of dense cores. We produce maps of the gas kinematics, temperature, and NH$_3$ column densities through forward modeling of the hyperfine structure of the NH$_3$ (1,1) and (2,2) lines. We show that the NH$_3$ velocity dispersion, ${\sigma}_v$, and gas kinetic temperature, $T_K$, vary systematically between the regions included in this release, with an increase in both the mean value and spread of ${\sigma}_v$ and $T_K$ with increasing star formation activity. The data presented in this paper are publicly available.
  • Compact substructure is expected to arise in a starless core as mass becomes concentrated in the central region likely to form a protostar. Additionally, multiple peaks may form if fragmentation occurs. We present ALMA Cycle 2 observations of 60 starless and protostellar cores in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We detect eight compact substructures which are >15 arcsec from the nearest Spitzer YSO. Only one of these has strong evidence for being truly starless after considering ancillary data, e.g., from Herschel and X-ray telescopes. An additional extended emission structure has tentative evidence for starlessness. The number of our detections is consistent with estimates from a combination of synthetic observations of numerical simulations and analytical arguments. This result suggests that a similar ALMA study in the Chamaeleon I cloud, which detected no compact substructure in starless cores, may be due to the peculiar evolutionary state of cores in that cloud.
  • Ammonia and its deuterated isotopologues probe physical conditions in dense molecular cloud cores. With the aim of testing the current understanding of the spin-state chemistry of these molecules, we observed spectral lines of NH3, NH2D, NHD2, ND3, and N2D+ towards a dense, starless core in Ophiuchus with the APEX, GBT, and IRAM 30-m telescopes. The observations were interpreted using a gas-grain chemistry model combined with radiative transfer calculations. The chemistry model distinguishes between the different nuclear spin states of light hydrogen molecules, ammonia, and their deuterated forms. High deuterium fractionation ratios with NH2D/NH3=0.4, NHD2/NH2D=0.2, and ND3/NHD2=0.06 were found in the core. The observed ortho/para ratios of NH2D and NHD2 are close to the corresponding nuclear spin statistical weights. The chemistry model can approximately reproduce the observed abundances, but predicts uniformly too low ortho/para-NH2D, and too large ortho/para-NHD2 ratios. The longevity of N2H+ and NH3 in dense gas, which is prerequisite to their strong deuteration, can be attributed to the chemical inertia of N2 on grain surfaces. The discrepancies between the chemistry model and the observations are likely to be caused by the fact that the model assumes complete scrambling in principal gas-phase deuteration reactions of ammonia, which means that all the nuclei are mixed in reactive collisions. If, instead, these reactions occur through proton hop/hydrogen abstraction processes, statistical spin ratios are to be expected. The present results suggest that while the deuteration of ammonia changes with physical conditions and time, the nuclear spin ratios of ammonia isotopologues do not probe the evolutionary stage of a cloud.
  • We use 3mm multi-line and continuum CARMA observations towards the first hydrostatic core (FHSC) candidate L1451-mm to characterize the envelope kinematics at 1000 AU scales and investigate its evolutionary state. We detect evidence of infall and rotation in the N2H+(1-0), NH2D(1(1,1)-1(0,1)) and HCN(1-0) molecular lines. We compare the position velocity diagram of the NH2D line with a simple kinematic model and find that it is consistent with an envelope that is both infalling and rotating while conserving angular momentum around a central mass of about 0.06 Msun. The N2H+(1-0) LTE mass of the envelope along with the inferred infall velocity leads to a mass infall rate of approximately 6e-6 Msun/yr, implying a young age of 10,000 years for this FHSC candidate. Assuming that the accretion onto the central object is the same as the infall rate we obtain that the minimum source size is 1.5-5 AU consistent with the size expected for a first core. We do not see any evidence of outflow motions or signs of outflow-envelope interaction at scales > 2000 AU. This is consistent with previous observations that revealed a very compact outflow (<500 AU). We conclude that L1451-mm is indeed at a very early stage of evolution, either a first core or an extremely young Class 0 protostar. Our results provide strong evidence that L1451-mm is the best candidate for being a bonafide first core.
  • We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that, if modelled as thermally-supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival $^{13}$CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure-confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.
  • We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, IRAM-30m) and space telescopes (Herschel, Planck). For the seven luminous ($L$$>$10$^{6}$ $L_{\odot}$) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified black-body fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The $\sim$10$"$ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3-kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed $\sim$10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function, the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations).
  • We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 106 GHz (Band 3) continuum survey of the complete population of dense cores in the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud. We detect a total of 24 continuum sources in 19 different target fields. All previously known Class 0 and Class I protostars in Chamaeleon I are detected, whereas all of the 56 starless cores in our sample are undetected. We show that the Spitzer+Herschel census of protostars in Chamaeleon I is complete, with the rate at which protostellar cores have been misclassified as starless cores calculated as <1/56, or < 2%. We use synthetic observations to show that starless cores collapsing following the turbulent fragmentation scenario are detectable by our ALMA observations when their central densities exceed ~10^8 cm^-3, with the exact density dependent on the viewing geometry. Bonnor-Ebert spheres, on the other hand, remain undetected to central densities at least as high as 10^10 cm^-3. Our starless core non-detections are used to infer that either the star formation rate is declining in Chamaeleon I and most of the starless cores are not collapsing, matching the findings of previous studies, or that the evolution of starless cores are more accurately described by models that develop less substructure than predicted by the turbulent fragmentation scenario, such as Bonnor-Ebert spheres. We outline future work necessary to distinguish between these two possibilities.
  • Spectral retrieval has proven to be a powerful tool for constraining the physical properties and atmospheric compositions of extrasolar planet atmospheres from observed spectra, primarily for transiting objects but also for directly imaged planets and brown dwarfs. Despite its strengths, this approach has been applied to only about a dozen targets. Determining the abundances of the main carbon and oxygen-bearing compounds in a planetary atmosphere can lead to the C/O ratio of the object, which is crucial in understanding its formation and migration history. We present a retrieval analysis on the published near-infrared spectrum of {\kappa} And b, a directly imaged substellar companion to a young B9 star. We fit the emission spectrum model utilizing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We estimate the abundance of water vapor, and its uncertainty, in the atmosphere of the object. In addition, we place an upper limit on the abundance of CH$_4$. We compare qualitatively our results to studies that have applied model retrieval on multiband photometry and emission spectroscopy of hot Jupiters (extrasolar giant planets with orbital periods of several days) and the directly imaged giant planet HR 8799b.
  • We investigate the alignment between outflow axes in nine of the youngest binary/multiple systems in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These systems have typical member spacing larger than 1000 AU. For outflow identification, we use 12CO(2-1) and 12CO(3-2) data from a large survey with the Sub- millimeter Array: Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES). The distribution of outflow orientations in the binary pairs is consistent with random or preferentially anti-aligned distributions, demonstrating that these outflows are misaligned. This result suggests that these systems are possibly formed in environments where the distribution of angular momentum is complex and disordered, and these systems do not come from the same co-rotating structures or from an initial cloud with aligned vectors of angular momentum.
  • Phases of gravitational instability are expected in the early phases of disk evolution, when the disk mass is still a substantial fraction of the mass of the star. Disk fragmentation into sub-stellar objects could occur in the cold exterior part of the disk. Direct detection of massive gaseous clumps on their way to collapse into gas giant planets would offer an unprecedented test of the disk instability model. Here we use state-of-the-art 3D radiation-hydro simulations of disks undergoing fragmentation into massive gas giants, post-processed with the RADMC-3D ray-tracing code to produce dust continuum emission maps. These are then fed into the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) ALMA simulator. The synthetic maps show that both overdense spiral arms and actual clumps at different stages of collapse can be detected with the Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array (ALMA) in the full configuration at the distance of the Ophiuchus star forming region (125 pc). The detection of clumps is particularly effective at shorter wavelengths (690 GHz) combining two resolutions with multi-scale clean. Furthermore, we show that a flux-based estimate of the mass of a protoplanetary clump can be from comparable to a factor of 3 higher than the gravitationally bound clump mass. The estimated mass depends on the assumed opacity, and on the gas temperature, which should be set using the input of radiation-hydro simulations. We conclude that ALMA has the capability to detect "smoking gun" systems that are a signpost of the disk instability model for gas giant planet formation.
  • Much of the dense gas in molecular clouds has a filamentary structure but the detailed structure and evolution of this gas is poorly known. We have observed 54 cores in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using N$_2$H$^+$ (1-0) and (3-2) to determine the kinematics of the densest material, where stars will form. We also observed N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2) towards 29 of the brightest peaks to analyse the level of deuteration which is an excellent probe of the quiescent of the early stages of star formation. There were 13 detections of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2). This is one of the largest samples of IRDCs yet observed in these species. The deuteration ratio in these sources ranges between 0.003 and 0.14. For most of the sources the material traced by N$_2$D$^+$ and N$_2$H$^+$ (3-2) still has significant turbulent motions, however three objects show subthermal N$_2$D$^+$ velocity dispersion. Surprisingly the presence or absence of an embedded 70 $\mu$m source shows no correlation with the detection of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2), nor does it correlate with any change in velocity dispersion or excitation temperature. Comparison with recent models of deuteration suggest evolutionary time-scales of these regions of several free-fall times or less.
  • We present continuum and molecular line observations at 230 GHz and 345 GHz from the Sub-millimeter Array (SMA) toward three protostars in the Perseus L1448N region. The data are from the large project "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA" (MASSES). Three dust continuum sources, Source B, Source NW, and Source A, are detected at both frequencies. These sources have corresponding emission peaks in C18O (J=2-1), 13CO (J=2-1), and HCO+ (J=4-3), and have offsets with N2D+ (J=3-2) peaks. High angular resolution data from a complimentary continuum survey with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that Source B is associated with three 8 mm continuum objects, Source NW with two, and Source A remains single. These results suggest that multiplicity in L1448N exists at different spatial scales from a few thousand AU to < 100 AU. Velocity gradients in each source obtained from two-dimensional fits to the SMA C18O emission are found to be perpendicular to within 20 degrees of the outflow directions as revealed by 12CO (J=2-1). We have observed that Sources B and NW with multiplicity have higher densities than Source A without multiplicity. This suggests that thermal Jeans fragmentation can be relevant in the fragmentation process. However, we have not observed a difference in the ratio between rotational and gravitational energy between sources with and without multiplicity. We also have not observed a trend between non-thermal velocity dispersions and the level of fragmentation. Our study has provided the first direct and comprehensive comparison between multiplicity and core properties in low-mass protostars, although based on small number statistics.
  • We propose a mechanism by which dust rings in protoplanetary disks can form and be long-lasting compared to gas rings. This involves the existence of a pressure maximum which traps dust either in between two gap-opening planets or at the outermost gap edge of a single or multiple planet system, combined with the decoupling of large dust particles from the gas. We perform 2D gas hydrodynamical simulations of disks with one and two giant planets which may open deep or partial gaps. A gas ring forms in between two planets such that the surface mass density is higher than on either side of it. This ring is a region of pressure maximum where we expect large grains, which are marginally coupled to the gas and would otherwise be subject to radial drift, to collect. Such a pressure maximum also occurs at the outermost gap edge in a disk with one or more planets. We infer the dust evolution in these regions as the gas disk evolves, to understand the longer term behavior of the resulting dust rings. Over time the gas surface density in the ring(s) decreases, which may cause the larger trapped particles to decouple. Consequently, these particles are expected to stay in ring structure(s) longer than the gas. For a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula model, we expect that millimeter and centimeter-sized grains in the outer O(10) au would most likely undergo this trapping and decoupling process.
  • The disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 100546 has been extensively studied and it is one of the systems for which there are observational indications of ongoing and/or recent planet formation. However, up until now no resolved image of the millimeter dust emission or the gas has been published. We present the first resolved images of the disk around HD 100546 obtained in Band 7 with the ALMA observatory. The CO (3-2) image reveals a gas disk that extends out to 350 au radius at the 3-sigma level. Surprisingly, the 870um dust continuum emission is compact (radius <60 au) and asymmetric. The dust emission is well matched by a truncated disk with outer radius of $\approx$50 au. The lack of millimeter-sized particles outside the 60 au is consistent with radial drift of particles of this size. The protoplanet candidate, identified in previous high-contrast NACO/VLT L' observations, could be related to the sharp outer edge of the millimeter-sized particles. Future higher angular resolution ALMA observations are needed to determine the detailed properties of the millimeter emission and the gas kinematics in the inner region (<2arcsec). Such observations could also reveal the presence of a planet through the detection of circumplanetary disk material.
  • We investigate the shape of the extinction law in two 1-degree square fields of the Perseus Molecular Cloud complex. We combine deep red-optical (r, i, and z-band) observations obtained using Megacam on the MMT with UKIDSS near-infrared (J, H, and K-band) data to measure the colours of background stars. We develop a new hierarchical Bayesian statistical model, including measurement error, intrinsic colour variation, spectral type, and dust reddening, to simultaneously infer parameters for individual stars and characteristics of the population. We implement an efficient MCMC algorithm utilising generalised Gibbs sampling to compute coherent probabilistic inferences. We find a strong correlation between the extinction (Av) and the slope of the extinction law (parameterized by Rv). Because the majority of the extinction toward our stars comes from the Perseus molecular cloud, we interpret this correlation as evidence of grain growth at moderate optical depths. The extinction law changes from the diffuse value of Rv = 3 to the dense cloud value of Rv = 5 as the column density rises from Av = 2 mags to Av = 10 mags. This relationship is similar for the two regions in our study, despite their different physical conditions, suggesting that dust grain growth is a fairly universal process.
  • Aims: We focus on the kinematical properties of a proto-binary to study the infall and rotation of gas towards its two protostellar components. Methods: We present ALMA Science Verification observations with high-spectral resolution of IRAS 16293-2422 at 220.2 GHz. The wealth of molecular lines in this source and the very high spectral resolution offered by ALMA allow us to study the gas kinematics with unprecedented detail. Results: We present the first detection of an inverse P-Cygni profile towards source B in the three brightest lines. The line profiles are fitted with a simple two-layer model to derive an infall rate of 4.5x10^-5 Msun/yr. This infall detection would rule-out the previously suggested possibility that source B is a T Tauri star. A position velocity diagram for source A shows evidence for rotation with an axis close to the line-of-sight.