• We present the gauge-invariant formalism of cosmological weak lensing, accounting for all the relativistic effects due to the scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations at the linear order. While the light propagation is fully described by the geodesic equation, the relation of the photon wavevector to the physical quantities requires the specification of the frames, where they are defined. By constructing the local tetrad bases at the observer and the source positions, we clarify the relation of the weak lensing observables such as the convergence, the shear, and the rotation to the physical size and shape defined in the source rest-frame and the observed angle and redshift measured in the observer rest-frame. Compared to the standard lensing formalism, additional relativistic effects contribute to all the lensing observables. We explicitly verify the gauge-invariance of the lensing observables and compare our results to previous work. In particular, we demonstrate that even in the presence of the vector and tensor perturbations, the physical rotation of the lensing observables vanishes at the linear order, while the tetrad basis rotates along the light propagation compared to a FRW coordinate. Though the latter is often used as a probe of primordial gravitational waves, the rotation of the tetrad basis is indeed not a physical observable. We further clarify its relation to the E-B decomposition in weak lensing. Our formalism provides a transparent and comprehensive perspective of cosmological weak lensing.
  • We present a complete set of exact and fully non-linear equations describing all three types of cosmological perturbations -- scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We derive the equations in a thoroughly gauge-ready manner, so that any spatial and temporal gauge conditions can be employed. The equations are completely general without any physical restriction except that we assume a flat homogeneous and isotropic universe as a background. We also comment briefly on the application of our formulation to the non-expanding Minkowski background.
  • We present the correlation function of the luminosity distances in a flat $\Lambda$CDM universe. Decomposing the luminosity distance fluctuation into the velocity, the gravitational potential, and the lensing contributions, we study their individual contributions to the correlation function. The lensing contribution is important at large redshift ($z\gtrsim 0.5$) but only for small angular separation ($\theta \lesssim 3^\circ$), while the velocity contribution dominates over the other contributions at low redshift or at larger separation. However, the gravitational potential contribution is always subdominant at all scale, if the correct gauge-invariant expression is used. The correlation function of the luminosity distances depends significantly on the matter content, especially for the lensing contribution, thus providing a novel tool of estimating cosmological parameters.
  • Theoretical descriptions of observable quantities in cosmological perturbation theory should be independent of coordinate systems. This statement is often referred to as gauge-invariance of observable quantities, and the sanity of their theoretical description is verified by checking its gauge-invariance. We argue that cosmological observables are invariant scalars under diffeomorphisms and as a consequence their theoretical description is gauge-invariant, only at linear order in perturbations. Beyond linear order, they are usually not gauge-invariant, and we provide the general law for the gauge-transformation that the perturbation part of an observable does obey. We apply this finding to derive the second-order expression for the observational light-cone average in cosmology and demonstrate that our expression is indeed invariant under diffeomorphisms.
  • The remarkable properties of the geodesic light-cone (GLC) coordinates allow analytic expressions for the light-cone observables, providing a new non-perturbative way for calculating the effects of inhomogeneities in our Universe. However, the gauge-invariance of these expressions in the GLC formalism has not been shown explicitly. Here we provide this missing part of the GLC formalism by proving the gauge-invariance of the GLC expressions for the light-cone observables, such as the observed redshift, the luminosity distance, and the physical area and volume of the observed sources. Our study provides a new insight on the properties of the GLC coordinates and it complements the previous work by the GLC collaboration, leading to a comprehensive description of light propagation in the GLC representation.
  • Measurements of the luminosity distance have played a key role in discovering the late-time cosmic acceleration. However, when accounting for inhomogeneities in the Universe, its interpretation has been plagued with infrared divergences in its theoretical predictions, which are in some cases used to explain the cosmic acceleration without dark energy. The divergences in most calculations are artificially removed by imposing an infrared cut-off scale. For the first time, we show that a gauge-invariant calculation of the luminosity distance is devoid of such divergences and consistent with the equivalence principle, eliminating the need to impose a cut-off scale. We present proper numerical calculations of the luminosity distance using the gauge-invariant expression and demonstrate that the numerical results with an ad hoc cut-off scale in previous calculations have negligible systematic errors as long as the cut-off scale is larger than the horizon scale. We discuss the origin of infrared divergences and their cancellation in the luminosity distance.
  • Comparing the luminosity distance measurements to its theoretical predictions is one of the cornerstones in establishing the modern cosmology. However, as shown in Biern & Yoo, its theoretical predictions in literature are often plagued with infrared divergences and gauge-dependences. This trend calls into question the sanity of the methods used to derive the luminosity distance. Here we critically investigate four different methods --- the geometric approach, the Sachs approach, the Jacobi mapping approach, and the geodesic light cone (GLC) approach to modeling the luminosity distance, and we present a unified treatment of such methods, facilitating the comparison among the methods and checking their sanity. All of these four methods, if exercised properly, can be used to reproduce the correct description of the luminosity distance.
  • We derive the exact third-order analytic solution of the matter density fluctuation in the proper-time hypersurface in a $\Lambda$CDM universe, accounting for the explicit time-dependence and clarifying the relation to the initial condition. Furthermore, we compare our analytic solution to the previous calculation in the comoving gauge, and to the standard Newtonian perturbation theory by providing Fourier kernels for the relativistic effects. Our results provide an essential ingredient for a complete description of galaxy bias in the relativistic context.
  • We present the third-order analytic solution of the matter density fluctuation in the proper-time hypersurface of nonrelativistic matter flows by solving the nonlinear general relativistic equations. The proper-time hypersurface provides a coordinate system that a local observer can set up without knowledge beyond its neighborhood, along with physical connections to the local Newtonian descriptions in the relativistic context. The initial condition of our analytic solution is set up by the curvature perturbation in the comoving gauge, clarifying its impact on the nonlinear evolution. We compute the effective non-Gaussian parameters due to the nonlinearity in the relativistic equations. With proper coordinate rescaling, we show that the equivalence principle is respected and the relativistic effect vanishes in the large-scale limit.
  • Current and future galaxy surveys cover a large fraction of the entire sky with a significant redshift range, and the recent theoretical development shows that general relativistic effects are present in galaxy clustering on very large scales. This trend has renewed interest in the wide angle effect in galaxy clustering measurements, in which the distant-observer approximation is often adopted. Using the full wide-angle formula for computing the redshift-space correlation function, we show that compared to the sample variance, the deviation in the redshift-space correlation function from the simple Kaiser formula with the distant-observer approximation is negligible in galaxy surveys such as the SDSS, Euclid and the BigBOSS, if the theoretical prediction from the Kaiser formula is properly averaged over the survey volume. We also find corrections to the wide-angle formula and clarify the confusion in literature between the wide angle effect and the velocity contribution in galaxy clustering. However, when the FKP method is applied, substantial deviations can be present in the power spectrum analysis in future surveys, due to the non-uniform distribution of galaxy pairs.
  • We compute the second-order density fluctuation in the proper-time hypersurface of non-relativistic matter flows and relate it to the galaxy number density fluctuation in general relativity. At the linear order, it is equivalent to the density fluctuation in the comoving synchronous gauge, in which two separate gauge conditions coincide. However, at the second order, the density fluctuations in these gauge conditions differ, while both gauge conditions represent the proper-time hypersurface. Compared to the density fluctuation in the temporal comoving and the spatial C-gauge conditions, the density fluctuation in the commonly used gauge condition ($N=1$ and $N^\alpha=0$) violates the mass conservation at the second order. We provide their physical interpretations in each gauge condition by solving the geodesic equation and the nonlinear evolution equations of non-relativistic matter. We apply this finding to the second-order galaxy biasing in general relativity, which complements the second-order relativistic description of galaxy clustering in Yoo & Zaldarriaga (2014).
  • The general relativistic description of galaxy clustering provides a complete and unified treatment of all the effects in galaxy clustering such as the redshift-space distortion, gravitational lensing, Sachs-Wolfe effects, and their relativistic effects. In particular, the relativistic description resolves the gauge issues in the standard Newtonian description of galaxy clustering by providing the gauge-invariant expression for the observed galaxy number density. The relativistic effect in galaxy clustering is significant on large scales, in which dark energy models or alternative theories of modified gravity deviate from general relativity. In this paper, we review the relativistic effect in galaxy clustering by providing a pedagogical derivation of the relativistic formula and by computing the observed galaxy two-point statistics. The relativistic description of galaxy clustering is an essential tool for testing general relativity and probing the early Universe on large scales in the era of precision cosmology.
  • We present the second-order general relativistic description of the observed galaxy number density in a cosmological framework. The observed galaxy number density is affected by the volume and the source effects, both of which arise due to the mismatch between physical and observationally inferred quantities such as the redshift, the angular position, the volume, and the luminosity of the observed galaxies. These effects are computed to the second order in metric perturbations without choosing a gauge condition or adopting any restrictions on vector and tensor perturbations, extending the previous linear-order calculations. Paying particular attention to the second-order gauge transformation, we explicitly isolate unphysical gauge modes and construct second-order gauge-invariant variables. Moreover, by constructing second-order tetrads in the observer's rest frame, we clarify the relation between the physical and the parametrized photon wavevectors. Our second-order relativistic description will provide an essential tool for going beyond the power spectrum in the era of precision measurements of galaxy clustering. We discuss potential applications and extensions of the second-order relativistic description of galaxy clustering.
  • We study the effect of the supersonic relative velocity between dark matter and baryons on large-scale galaxy clustering and derive the constraint on the relative velocity bias parameter from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) power spectrum measurements. Recent work has shown that the relative velocity effect may have a dramatic impact on the star formation at high redshifts, if first stars are formed in minihalos around z~20, or if the effect propagates through secondary effects to stars formed at later redshifts. The relative velocity effect has particularly strong signatures in the large scale clustering of these sources, including the BAO position. Assuming that a small fraction of stars in low-redshift massive galaxies retain the memory of the primordial relative velocity effect, galaxy clustering measurements can be used to constrain the signatures of the first stars. Luminous red galaxies contain some of the oldest stars in the Universe and are ideally suited to search for this effect. Using the BOSS power spectrum measurements from the Sloan Data Release 9, in combination with Planck, we derive the upper limit on the fraction of the stars sensitive to relative velocity effect f_star<3.3% at the 95% confidence level in the CMASS galaxy sample. If additional galaxy sample not sensitive to the effect is available in a given survey, a joint multi-tracer analysis can be applied to construct a sample-variance cancelling combination, providing a model-independent way to verify the presence of the relative velocity effect in the galaxy power spectrum on large scales. Such a multi-tracer analysis in future galaxy surveys can greatly improve the current constraint, achieving a 0.1% level in f_star.
  • We explore the signatures of quintessence and modified gravity theories in the relativistic description of galaxy clustering within a parametrized post-Friedmann framework. For this purpose, we develop a calibration method to consistently account for horizon-scale effects in the linear parametrized Post-Friedmann perturbations of minimally and nonminimally coupled scalar-tensor theories and test it against the full model-specific fluctuations. We further study the relativistic effects in galaxy clustering for the normal and self-accelerating branches of the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld model as well as for phenomenological modifications of gravity. We quantify the impact of modified gravity and dark energy models on galaxy clustering by computing the velocity-to-matter density ratio F, the velocity contribution R, and the potential contribution P and give an estimate of their detectability in future galaxy surveys. Our results show that, in general, the relativistic correction contains additional information on gravity and dark energy, which needs to be taken into account in consistent horizon-scale tests of departures from LCDM using the galaxy-density field.
  • We perform an all-sky analysis of the general relativistic galaxy power spectrum using the well-developed spherical Fourier decomposition. Spherical Fourier analysis expresses the observed galaxy fluctuation in terms of the spherical harmonics and spherical Bessel functions that are angular and radial eigenfunctions of the Helmholtz equation, providing a natural orthogonal basis for all-sky analysis of the large-scale mode measurements. Accounting for all the relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, we compute the spherical power spectrum and its covariance matrix and compare it to the standard three-dimensional power spectrum to establish a connection. The spherical power spectrum recovers the three-dimensional power spectrum at each wavenumber k with its angular dependence mu_k encoded in angular multipole l, and the contributions of the line-of-sight projection to galaxy clustering such as the gravitational lensing effect can be readily accommodated in the spherical Fourier analysis. A complete list of formulas for computing the relativistic spherical galaxy power spectrum is also presented.
  • The proper general relativistic description of the observed galaxy power spectrum is substantially different from the standard Newtonian description on large scales, providing a unique opportunity to test general relativity on horizon scales. Using the Einstein equations, the general relativistic effects can be classified as two new terms that represent the velocity and the gravitational potential, coupling to the time evolution of galaxy number density and Hubble parameter. Compared to the dominant density and velocity redshift-space distortion terms, the former scales as H/k and correlates the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier modes, while the latter scales as (H/k)^2, where k is the comoving wave number and H is the conformal Hubble parameter. We use the recently developed methods to reduce the sampling variance and shot noise to show that in an all sky galaxy redshift survey at low redshift the velocity term can be measured at 10-sigma confidence level, if one can utilize halos of mass M>10^{10} Msun, while the gravitational potential term itself can only be marginally detected. We also demonstrate that the general relativistic effect is not degenerate with the primordial non-Gaussian signature in galaxy bias, and the ability to detect the primordial non-Gaussianity is little compromised.
  • We explore three different methods based on weak lensing to extract cosmological constraints from the large-scale structure. In the first approach (method I), small-scale galaxy lensing measurements of their halo mass provide a constraint on the halo bias, which can be combined with the large-scale galaxy clustering to measure the dark matter clustering. In the second approach (method II), large-scale galaxy clustering and large-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing can be combined into a direct measurement of the dark matter clustering. These two methods can be combined into one method I+II to make use of lensing measurements on all scales. In the third approach (method III), we add abundance information to the method I. We explore the statistical power of these three approaches as a function of galaxy luminosity to investigate the optimal mass range for each method and their cosmological constraining power. In the case of the SDSS, we find that the three methods give comparable constraints, but not in the same mass range: the method II works best for halos of M~10^13 Msun, and the methods I and III work best for halos of M~10^14 Msun. We discuss the robustness of each method against various systematics. Furthermore, we extend the analysis to the future large-scale galaxy surveys and find that the cluster abundance method is not superior to the combined method I+II, both in terms of statistical power and robustness against systematic errors. The cosmic shear-shear correlation analysis in the future surveys yields constraints as strong as the combined method, but suffer from additional systematic effects. We thus advocate the combined analysis of clustering and lensing (method I+II) as a powerful alternative to other large-scale probes. Our analysis provides a guidance to observers planning large-scale galaxy surveys such as the DES, Euclid, and the LSST.
  • Kaiser redshift-space distortion formula describes well the clustering of galaxies in redshift surveys on small scales, but there are numerous additional terms that arise on large scales. Some of these terms can be described using Newtonian dynamics and have been discussed in the literature, while the others require proper general relativistic description that was only recently developed. Accounting for these terms in galaxy clustering is the first step toward tests of general relativity on horizon scales. The effects can be classified as two terms that represent the velocity and the gravitational potential contributions. Their amplitude is determined by effects such as the volume and luminosity distance fluctuation effects and the time evolution of galaxy number density and Hubble parameter. We compare the Newtonian approximation often used in the redshift-space distortion literature to the fully general relativistic equation, and show that Newtonian approximation accounts for most of the terms contributing to velocity effect. We perform a Fisher matrix analysis of detectability of these terms and show that in a single tracer survey they are completely undetectable. To detect these terms one must resort to the recently developed methods to reduce sampling variance and shot noise. We show that in an all-sky galaxy redshift survey at low redshift the velocity term can be measured at a few sigma if one can utilize halos of mass M>10^12 Msun (this can increase to 10-sigma or more in some more optimistic scenarios), while the gravitational potential term itself can only be marginally detected. We also demonstrate that the general relativistic effect is not degenerate with the primordial non-Gaussian signature in galaxy bias, and the ability to detect primordial non-Gaussianity is little compromised.
  • We extend the general relativistic description of galaxy clustering developed in Yoo, Fitzpatrick, and Zaldarriaga (2009). For the first time we provide a fully general relativistic description of the observed matter power spectrum and the observed galaxy power spectrum with the linear bias ansatz. It is significantly different from the standard Newtonian description on large scales and especially its measurements on large scales can be misinterpreted as the detection of the primordial non-Gaussianity even in the absence thereof. The key difference in the observed galaxy power spectrum arises from the real-space matter fluctuation defined as the matter fluctuation at the hypersurface of the observed redshift. As opposed to the standard description, the shape of the observed galaxy power spectrum evolves in redshift, providing additional cosmological information. While the systematic errors in the standard Newtonian description are negligible in the current galaxy surveys at low redshift, correct general relativistic description is essential for understanding the galaxy power spectrum measurements on large scales in future surveys with redshift depth z>3. We discuss ways to improve the detection significance in the current galaxy surveys and comment on applications of our general relativistic formalism in future surveys.
  • We present a coherent theoretical framework for computing gravitational lensing effects and redshift-space distortions in an inhomogeneous universe and investigate their impacts on galaxy two-point statistics. Adopting the linearized FRW metric, we derive the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects that include the weak lensing distortion, magnification, and time delay effects, and the redshift-space distortion, Sachs-Wolfe, and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects, respectively. Based on this framework, we first compute their effects on observed source fluctuations, separating them as two physically distinct origins: the volume effect that involves the change of volume and is always present in galaxy two-point statistics, and the source effect that depends on the intrinsic properties of source populations. Then we identify several terms that are ignored in the standard method, and we compute the observed galaxy two-point statistics, an ensemble average of all the combinations of the intrinsic source fluctuations and the additional contributions from the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects. This unified treatment of galaxy two-point statistics clarifies the relation of the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects to the metric perturbations and the underlying matter fluctuations. For near future dark energy surveys, we compute additional contributions to the observed galaxy two-point statistics and analyze their impact on the anisotropic structure. Thorough theoretical modeling of galaxy two-point statistics would be not only necessary to analyze precision measurements from upcoming dark energy surveys, but also provide further discriminatory power in understanding the underlying physical mechanisms.
  • We develop a new method for reconstructing cluster mass profiles and large-scale structure from the cosmic microwave background (CMB). By analyzing the likelihood of CMB lensing, we analytically prove that standard quadratic estimators for CMB lensing are unbiased and achieve the optimal condition only in the limit of no lensing; they become progressively biased and sub-optimal, when the lensing effect is large, especially for clusters that can be found by ongoing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys. Adopting an alternative approach to the CMB likelihood, we construct a new maximum likelihood estimator that utilizes delensed CMB temperature fields based on an assumed model. We analytically show that this estimator asymptotically approaches the optimal condition as our assumed model is refined, and we numerically show that our estimator quickly converges to the true model as we iteratively apply it to CMB maps. For realistic CMB experiments, we demonstrate the applicability of the maximum likelihood estimator with tests against numerical simulations in the presence of CMB secondary contaminants. With significant improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio, our new maximum likelihood estimator can be used to measure the cluster-mass cross-correlation functions at different redshifts, probing the evolution of dark energy.
  • The shape of the primordial matter power spectrum Plin(k) encodes critical information on cosmological parameters. At large scales, the observable galaxy power spectrum Pobs(k) is expected to follow the shape of Plin(k), but on smaller scales the effects of nonlinearity and galaxy bias make the ratio Pobs(k)/Plin(k) scale-dependent. We develop a method that can extend the dynamic range of the Plin(k) recovery by incorporating constraints on the galaxy halo occupation distribution (HOD) from the projected galaxy correlation function wp. We devise an analytic model to calculate Pobs(k) in real-space and redshift-space. Once HOD parameters are determined by matching wp for a given cosmological model, galaxy bias is completely specified, and our analytic model predicts both the shape and normalization of Pobs(k). Applying our method to SDSS main galaxy samples, we find that the real-space Pobs(k) follows the shape of the nonlinear matter power spectrum at the 1-2% level up to k=0.2 h/Mpc. When we apply our method to SDSS LRG samples, the linear bias approximation is accurate to 5% at k<0.08 h/Mpc, but the scale-dependence of LRG bias prevents the use of linear theory at k>0.08 h/Mpc. Our HOD model prediction is in good agreement with the recent SDSS LRG Pobs(k) measurements at all measured scales (k<0.2 h/Mpc), naturally explaining the shape of Pobs(k). The "Q-model" prescription is a poor description of galaxy bias for the LRG samples, and it can lead to biased cosmological parameter estimates when measurements at k>0.1 h/Mpc are included in the analysis. We quantify the potential bias and constraints on cosmological parameters that arise from applying linear theory and Q-model fitting, and we demonstrate the utility of HOD modeling of future high precision measurements of Pobs(k) on quasi-linear scales.
  • Recent observations support the idea that nuclear black holes grew by gas accretion while shining as luminous quasars at high redshift, and they establish a relation of the black hole mass with the host galaxy's spheroidal stellar system. We develop an analytic model to calculate the expected impact of mergers on the masses of black holes in massive clusters of galaxies. We use the extended Press-Schechter formalism to generate Monte Carlo merger histories of halos with a mass 10^{15} h^{-1} Msun. We assume that the black hole mass function at z=2 is similar to that inferred from observations at z=0 (since quasar activity declines markedly at z<2), and we assign black holes to the progenitor halos assuming a monotonic relation between halo mass and black hole mass. We follow the dynamical evolution of subhalos within larger halos, allowing for tidal stripping, the loss of orbital energy by dynamical friction, and random orbital perturbations in gravitational encounters with subhalos, and we assume that mergers of subhalos are followed by mergers of their central black holes. Our analytic model reproduces numerical estimates of the subhalo mass function. We find that the most massive black holes in massive clusters typically grow by a factor ~ 2 by mergers after gas accretion has stopped. In our ten realizations of 10^{15} h^{-1} Msun clusters, the highest initial (z=2) black hole masses are 5-7 x 10^9 Msun, but four of the clusters contain black holes in the range 1-1.5 x 10^{10} Msun at z=0. Satellite galaxies may host black holes whose mass is comparable to, or even greater than, that of the central galaxy. Thus, black hole mergers can significantly extend the very high end of the black hole mass function.
  • Galaxy-galaxy lensing measures the mean excess surface density DS(r) around a sample of lensing galaxies. We develop a method for combining DS(r) with the galaxy correlation function xi_gg(r) to constrain Omega_m and sigma_8, going beyond the linear bias model to reach the level of accuracy demanded by current and future measurements. We adopt the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework, and we test its applicability to this problem by examining the effects of replacing satellite galaxies in the halos of an SPH simulation with randomly selected dark matter particles from the same halos. The difference between dark matter and satellite galaxy radial profiles has a ~10% effect on DS(r) at r<1 Mpc/h. However, if radial profiles are matched, the remaining impact of individual subhalos around satellite galaxies and environmental dependence of the HOD at fixed halo mass is <5% in DS(r) for 0.1<r<15 Mpc/h. We develop an analytic approximation for DS(r) that incorporates halo exclusion and scale-dependent halo bias, and we demonstrate its accuracy with tests against a suite of populated N-body simulations. We use the analytic model to investigate the dependence of DS(r) and the galaxy-matter correlation function xi_gm(r) on Omega_m and sigma_8, once HOD parameters for a given cosmological model are pinned down by matching xi_gg(r). The linear bias prediction is accurate for r>2 Mpc/h, but it fails at the 30-50% level on smaller scales. The scaling of DS(r) ~ Omega_m^a(r) sigma_8^b(r) approaches the linear bias expectation a=b=1 at r>10 Mpc/h, but a(r) and b(r) vary from 0.8 to 1.6 at smaller r. We calculate a fiducial DS(r) and scaling indices a(r) and b(r) for two SDSS galaxy samples; galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements for these samples can be combined with our predictions to constrain Omega_m and sigma_8.