• The girth of a graph, i.e. the length of its shortest cycle, is a fundamental graph parameter. Unfortunately all known algorithms for computing, even approximately, the girth and girth-related structures in directed weighted $m$-edge and $n$-node graphs require $\Omega(\min\{n^{\omega}, mn\})$ time (for $2\leq\omega<2.373$). In this paper, we drastically improve these runtimes as follows: * Multiplicative Approximations in Nearly Linear Time: We give an algorithm that in $\widetilde{O}(m)$ time computes an $\widetilde{O}(1)$-multiplicative approximation of the girth as well as an $\widetilde{O}(1)$-multiplicative roundtrip spanner with $\widetilde{O}(n)$ edges with high probability (w.h.p). * Nearly Tight Additive Approximations: For unweighted graphs and any $\alpha \in (0,1)$ we give an algorithm that in $\widetilde{O}(mn^{1 - \alpha})$ time computes an $O(n^\alpha)$-additive approximation of the girth w.h.p, and partially derandomize it. We show that the runtime of our algorithm cannot be significantly improved without a breakthrough in combinatorial Boolean matrix multiplication. Our main technical contribution to achieve these results is the first nearly linear time algorithm for computing roundtrip covers, a directed graph decomposition concept key to previous roundtrip spanner constructions. Previously it was not known how to compute these significantly faster than $\Omega(\min\{n^\omega, mn\})$ time. Given the traditional difficulty in efficiently processing directed graphs, we hope our techniques may find further applications.
  • Reinforcement learning algorithms can train agents that solve problems in complex, interesting environments. Normally, the complexity of the trained agent is closely related to the complexity of the environment. This suggests that a highly capable agent requires a complex environment for training. In this paper, we point out that a competitive multi-agent environment trained with self-play can produce behaviors that are far more complex than the environment itself. We also point out that such environments come with a natural curriculum, because for any skill level, an environment full of agents of this level will have the right level of difficulty. This work introduces several competitive multi-agent environments where agents compete in a 3D world with simulated physics. The trained agents learn a wide variety of complex and interesting skills, even though the environment themselves are relatively simple. The skills include behaviors such as running, blocking, ducking, tackling, fooling opponents, kicking, and defending using both arms and legs. A highlight of the learned behaviors can be found here: https://goo.gl/eR7fbX
  • In the communication problem $\mathbf{UR}$ (universal relation) [KRW95], Alice and Bob respectively receive $x, y \in\{0,1\}^n$ with the promise that $x\neq y$. The last player to receive a message must output an index $i$ such that $x_i\neq y_i$. We prove that the randomized one-way communication complexity of this problem in the public coin model is exactly $\Theta(\min\{n,\log(1/\delta)\log^2(\frac n{\log(1/\delta)})\})$ for failure probability $\delta$. Our lower bound holds even if promised $\mathop{support}(y)\subset \mathop{support}(x)$. As a corollary, we obtain optimal lower bounds for $\ell_p$-sampling in strict turnstile streams for $0\le p < 2$, as well as for the problem of finding duplicates in a stream. Our lower bounds do not need to use large weights, and hold even if promised $x\in\{0,1\}^n$ at all points in the stream. We give two different proofs of our main result. The first proof demonstrates that any algorithm $\mathcal A$ solving sampling problems in turnstile streams in low memory can be used to encode subsets of $[n]$ of certain sizes into a number of bits below the information theoretic minimum. Our encoder makes adaptive queries to $\mathcal A$ throughout its execution, but done carefully so as to not violate correctness. This is accomplished by injecting random noise into the encoder's interactions with $\mathcal A$, which is loosely motivated by techniques in differential privacy. Our second proof is via a novel randomized reduction from Augmented Indexing [MNSW98] which needs to interact with $\mathcal A$ adaptively. To handle the adaptivity we identify certain likely interaction patterns and union bound over them to guarantee correct interaction on all of them. To guarantee correctness, it is important that the interaction hides some of its randomness from $\mathcal A$ in the reduction.
  • In the communication problem $\mathbf{UR}$ (universal relation) [KRW95], Alice and Bob respectively receive $x$ and $y$ in $\{0,1\}^n$ with the promise that $x\neq y$. The last player to receive a message must output an index $i$ such that $x_i\neq y_i$. We prove that the randomized one-way communication complexity of this problem in the public coin model is exactly $\Theta(\min\{n, \log(1/\delta)\log^2(\frac{n}{\log(1/\delta)})\})$ bits for failure probability $\delta$. Our lower bound holds even if promised $\mathop{support}(y)\subset \mathop{support}(x)$. As a corollary, we obtain optimal lower bounds for $\ell_p$-sampling in strict turnstile streams for $0\le p < 2$, as well as for the problem of finding duplicates in a stream. Our lower bounds do not need to use large weights, and hold even if it is promised that $x\in\{0,1\}^n$ at all points in the stream. Our lower bound demonstrates that any algorithm $\mathcal{A}$ solving sampling problems in turnstile streams in low memory can be used to encode subsets of $[n]$ of certain sizes into a number of bits below the information theoretic minimum. Our encoder makes adaptive queries to $\mathcal{A}$ throughout its execution, but done carefully so as to not violate correctness. This is accomplished by injecting random noise into the encoder's interactions with $\mathcal{A}$, which is loosely motivated by techniques in differential privacy. Our correctness analysis involves understanding the ability of $\mathcal{A}$ to correctly answer adaptive queries which have positive but bounded mutual information with $\mathcal{A}$'s internal randomness, and may be of independent interest in the newly emerging area of adaptive data analysis with a theoretical computer science lens.
  • We develop new methods based on graph motifs for graph clustering, allowing more efficient detection of communities within networks. We focus on triangles within graphs, but our techniques extend to other clique motifs as well. Our intuition, which has been suggested but not formalized similarly in previous works, is that triangles are a better signature of community than edges. We therefore generalize the notion of conductance for a graph to {\em triangle conductance}, where the edges are weighted according to the number of triangles containing the edge. This methodology allows us to develop variations of several existing clustering techniques, including spectral clustering, that minimize triangles split by the cluster instead of edges cut by the cluster. We provide theoretical results in a planted partition model to demonstrate the potential for triangle conductance in clustering problems. We then show experimentally the effectiveness of our methods to multiple applications in machine learning and graph mining.
  • A spectral sparsifier of a graph $G$ is a sparser graph $H$ that approximately preserves the quadratic form of $G$, i.e. for all vectors $x$, $x^T L_G x \approx x^T L_H x$, where $L_G$ and $L_H$ denote the respective graph Laplacians. Spectral sparsifiers generalize cut sparsifiers, and have found many applications in designing graph algorithms. In recent years, there has been interest in computing spectral sparsifiers in semi-streaming and dynamic settings. Natural algorithms in these settings often involve repeated sparsification of a graph, and accumulation of errors across these steps. We present a framework for analyzing algorithms that perform repeated sparsifications that only incur error corresponding to a single sparsification step, leading to better results for many resparsification-based algorithms. As an application, we show how to maintain a spectral sparsifier in the semi-streaming setting: We present a simple algorithm that, for a graph $G$ on $n$ vertices and $m$ edges, computes a spectral sparsifier of $G$ with $O(n \log n)$ edges in a single pass over $G$, using only $O(n \log n)$ space, and $O(m \log^2 n)$ total time. This improves on previous best semi-streaming algorithms for both spectral and cut sparsifiers by a factor of $\log{n}$ in both space and runtime. The algorithm extends to semi-streaming row sampling for general PSD matrices. We also use our framework to combine a spectral sparsification algorithm by Koutis with improved spanner constructions to give a parallel algorithm for constructing $O(n\log^2{n}\log\log{n})$ sized spectral sparsifiers in $O(m\log^2{n}\log\log{n})$ time. This is the best known combinatorial graph sparsification algorithm.The size of the sparsifiers is only a factor $\log{n}\log\log{n}$ more than ones produced by numerical routines.
  • In this paper we provide faster algorithms for solving the geometric median problem: given $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^{d}$ compute a point that minimizes the sum of Euclidean distances to the points. This is one of the oldest non-trivial problems in computational geometry yet despite an abundance of research the previous fastest algorithms for computing a $(1+\epsilon)$-approximate geometric median were $O(d\cdot n^{4/3}\epsilon^{-8/3})$ by Chin et. al, $\tilde{O}(d\exp{\epsilon^{-4}\log\epsilon^{-1}})$ by Badoiu et. al, $O(nd+\mathrm{poly}(d,\epsilon^{-1})$ by Feldman and Langberg, and $O((nd)^{O(1)}\log\frac{1}{\epsilon})$ by Parrilo and Sturmfels and Xue and Ye. In this paper we show how to compute a $(1+\epsilon)$-approximate geometric median in time $O(nd\log^{3}\frac{1}{\epsilon})$ and $O(d\epsilon^{-2})$. While our $O(d\epsilon^{-2})$ is a fairly straightforward application of stochastic subgradient descent, our $O(nd\log^{3}\frac{1}{\epsilon})$ time algorithm is a novel long step interior point method. To achieve this running time we start with a simple $O((nd)^{O(1)}\log\frac{1}{\epsilon})$ time interior point method and show how to improve it, ultimately building an algorithm that is quite non-standard from the perspective of interior point literature. Our result is one of very few cases we are aware of outperforming traditional interior point theory and the only we are aware of using interior point methods to obtain a nearly linear time algorithm for a canonical optimization problem that traditionally requires superlinear time. We hope our work leads to further improvements in this line of research.
  • We show that schemes for sparsifying matrices based on iteratively resampling rows yield guarantees matching classic 'offline' sparsifiers (see e.g. Spielman and Srivastava [STOC 2008]). In particular, this gives a formal analysis of a scheme very similar to the one proposed by Kelner and Levin [TCS 2013].
  • Finding a small spectral approximation for a tall $n \times d$ matrix $A$ is a fundamental numerical primitive. For a number of reasons, one often seeks an approximation whose rows are sampled from those of $A$. Row sampling improves interpretability, saves space when $A$ is sparse, and preserves row structure, which is especially important, for example, when $A$ represents a graph. However, correctly sampling rows from $A$ can be costly when the matrix is large and cannot be stored and processed in memory. Hence, a number of recent publications focus on row sampling in the streaming setting, using little more space than what is required to store the outputted approximation [KL13, KLM+14]. Inspired by a growing body of work on online algorithms for machine learning and data analysis, we extend this work to a more restrictive online setting: we read rows of $A$ one by one and immediately decide whether each row should be kept in the spectral approximation or discarded, without ever retracting these decisions. We present an extremely simple algorithm that approximates $A$ up to multiplicative error $\epsilon$ and additive error $\delta$ using $O(d \log d \log(\epsilon||A||_2/\delta)/\epsilon^2)$ online samples, with memory overhead proportional to the cost of storing the spectral approximation. We also present an algorithm that uses $O(d^2$) memory but only requires $O(d\log(\epsilon||A||_2/\delta)/\epsilon^2)$ samples, which we show is optimal. Our methods are clean and intuitive, allow for lower memory usage than prior work, and expose new theoretical properties of leverage score based matrix approximation.
  • We introduce the notion of balance for directed graphs: a weighted directed graph is $\alpha$-balanced if for every cut $S \subseteq V$, the total weight of edges going from $S$ to $V\setminus S$ is within factor $\alpha$ of the total weight of edges going from $V\setminus S$ to $S$. Several important families of graphs are nearly balanced, in particular, Eulerian graphs (with $\alpha = 1$) and residual graphs of $(1+\epsilon)$-approximate undirected maximum flows (with $\alpha=O(1/\epsilon)$). We use the notion of balance to give a more fine-grained understanding of several well-studied routing questions that are considerably harder in directed graphs. We first revisit oblivious routings in directed graphs. Our main algorithmic result is an oblivious routing scheme for single-source instances that achieve an $O(\alpha \cdot \log^3 n / \log \log n)$ competitive ratio. In the process, we make several technical contributions which may be of independent interest. In particular, we give an efficient algorithm for computing low-radius decompositions of directed graphs parameterized by balance. We also define and construct low-stretch arborescences, a generalization of low-stretch spanning trees to directed graphs. On the negative side, we present new lower bounds for oblivious routing problems on directed graphs. We show that the competitive ratio of oblivious routing algorithms for directed graphs is $\Omega(n)$ in general; this result improves upon the long-standing best known lower bound of $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ given by Hajiaghayi, Kleinberg, Leighton and R\"acke in 2006. We also show that our restriction to single-source instances is necessary by showing an $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ lower bound for multiple-source oblivious routing in Eulerian graphs. We also give a fast algorithm for the maximum flow problem in balanced directed graphs.
  • We prove that unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH) fails, deciding if there is a homomorphism from graph $G$ to graph $H$ cannot be done in time $|V(H)|^{o(|V(G)|)}$. We also show an exponential-time reduction from Graph Homomorphism to Subgraph Isomorphism. This rules out (subject to ETH) a possibility of $|V(H)|^{o(|V(H)|)}$-time algorithm deciding if graph $G$ is a subgraph of $H$. For both problems our lower bounds asymptotically match the running time of brute-force algorithms trying all possible mappings of one graph into another. Thus, our work closes the gap in the known complexity of these fundamental problems. Moreover, as a consequence of our reductions conditional lower bounds follow for other related problems such as Locally Injective Homomorphism, Graph Minors, Topological Graph Minors, Minimum Distortion Embedding and Quadratic Assignment Problem.
  • Subgraph Isomorphism is a very basic graph problem, where given two graphs $G$ and $H$ one is to check whether $G$ is a subgraph of $H$. Despite its simple definition, the Subgraph Isomorphism problem turns out to be very broad, as it generalizes problems such as Clique, $r$-Coloring, Hamiltonicity, Set Packing and Bandwidth. However, for all of the mentioned problems $2^{\mathcal{O}(n)}$ time algorithms exist, so a natural and frequently asked question in the past was whether there exists a $2^{\mathcal{O}(n)}$ time algorithm for Subgraph Isomorphism. In the monograph of Fomin and Kratsch [Springer'10] this question is highlighted as an open problem, among few others. Our main result is a reduction from 3-SAT, producing a subexponential number of sublinear instances of the Subgraph Isomorphism problem. In particular, our reduction implies a $2^{\Omega(n \sqrt{\log n})}$ lower bound for Subgraph Isomorphism under the Exponential Time Hypothesis. This shows that there exist classes of graphs that are strictly harder to embed than cliques or Hamiltonian cycles. The core of our reduction consists of two steps. First, we preprocess and pack variables and clauses of a 3-SAT formula into groups of logarithmic size. However, the grouping is not arbitrary, since as a result we obtain only a limited interaction between the groups. In the second step, we overcome the technical hardness of encoding evaluations as permutations by a simple, yet fruitful scheme of guessing the sizes of preimages of an arbitrary mapping, reducing the case of arbitrary mapping to bijections. In fact, when applying this step to a recent independent result of Fomin et al.[arXiv:1502.05447 (2015)], who showed hardness of Graph Homomorphism, we can transfer their hardness result to Subgraph Isomorphism, implying a nearly tight lower bound of $2^{\Omega(n \log n / \log \log n)}$.
  • We derive a simple efficient algorithm for Abelian periods knowing all Abelian squares in a string. An efficient algorithm for the latter problem was given by Cummings and Smyth in 1997. By the way we show an alternative algorithm for Abelian squares. We also obtain a linear time algorithm finding all `long' Abelian periods. The aim of the paper is a (new) reduction of the problem of all Abelian periods to that of (already solved) all Abelian squares which provides new insight into both connected problems.