• We use deep Chandra X-ray imaging to measure the distribution of specific black hole accretion rates ($L_X$ relative to the stellar mass of the galaxy) and thus trace AGN activity within star-forming and quiescent galaxies, as a function of stellar mass (from $10^{8.5}-10^{11.5} M_\odot$) and redshift (to $z \sim 4$). We adopt near-infrared selected samples of galaxies from the CANDELS and UltraVISTA surveys, extract X-ray data for every galaxy, and use a flexible Bayesian method to combine these data and to measure the probability distribution function of specific black hole accretion rates, $\lambda_{sBHAR}$. We identify a broad distribution of $\lambda_{sBHAR}$ in both star-forming and quiescent galaxies---likely reflecting the stochastic nature of AGN fuelling---with a roughly power-law shape that rises toward lower $\lambda_{sBHAR}$, a steep cutoff at $\lambda_{sBHAR} \gtrsim 0.1-1$ (in Eddington equivalent units), and a turnover or flattening at $\lambda_{sBHAR} \lesssim 10^{-3}-10^{-2}$. We find that the probability of a star-forming galaxy hosting a moderate $\lambda_{sBHAR}$ AGN depends on stellar mass and evolves with redshift, shifting toward higher $\lambda_{sBHAR}$ at higher redshifts. This evolution is truncated at a point corresponding to the Eddington limit, indicating black holes may self-regulate their growth at high redshifts when copious gas is available. The probability of a quiescent galaxy hosting an AGN is generally lower than that of a star-forming galaxy, shows signs of suppression at the highest stellar masses, and evolves strongly with redshift. The AGN duty cycle in high-redshift ($z\gtrsim2$) quiescent galaxies thus reaches $\sim$20 per cent, comparable to the duty cycle in star-forming galaxies of equivalent stellar mass and redshift.
  • Using observations from the first two years of the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we study 13 AGN-driven outflows detected from a sample of 67 X-ray, IR and/or optically-selected AGN at $z \sim 2$. The AGN have bolometric luminosities of $\sim10^{44}-10^{46} ~\mathrm{erg~s^{-1}}$, including both quasars and moderate-luminosity AGN. We detect blueshifted, ionized gas outflows in the H$\beta$ , [OIII], H$\alpha$ ~and/or [NII] emission lines of $19\%$ of the AGN, while only 1.8\% of the MOSDEF galaxies have similarly-detected outflows. The outflow velocities span $\sim$300 to 1000 km s$^{-1}$. Eight of the 13 outflows are spatially extended on similar scales as the host galaxies, with spatial extents of 2.5 to 11.0 kpc. Outflows are detected uniformly across the star-forming main sequence, showing little trend with the host galaxy SFR. Line ratio diagnostics indicate that the outflowing gas is photoionized by the AGN. We do not find evidence for positive AGN feedback, in either our small MOSDEF sample or a much larger SDSS sample, using the BPT diagram. Given that a galaxy with an AGN is ten times more likely to have a detected outflow, the outflowing gas is photoionzed by the AGN, and estimates of the mass and energy outflow rates indicate that stellar feedback is insufficient to drive at least some of these outflows, they are very likely to be AGN-driven. The outflows have mass-loading factors of the order of unity, suggesting that they help regulate star formation in their host galaxies, though they may be insufficient to fully quench it.
  • We present the first spectroscopic measurement of multiple rest-frame optical emission lines at $z>4$. During the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we observed the galaxy GOODSN-17940 with the Keck I/MOSFIRE spectrograph. The K-band spectrum of GOODSN-17940 includes significant detections of the [OII]$\lambda\lambda 3726,3729$, [NeIII]$\lambda3869$, and H$\gamma$ emission lines and a tentative detection of H$\delta$, indicating $z_{\rm{spec}}=4.4121$. GOODSN-17940 is an actively star-forming $z>4$ galaxy based on its K-band spectrum and broadband spectral energy distribution. A significant excess relative to the surrounding continuum is present in the Spitzer/IRAC channel 1 photometry of GOODSN-17940, due primarily to strong H$\alpha$ emission with a rest-frame equivalent width of $\mbox{EW(H}\alpha)=1200$ \AA. Based on the assumption of $0.5 Z_{\odot}$ models and the Calzetti attenuation curve, GOODSN-17940 is characterized by $M_*=5.0^{+4.3}_{-0.2}\times 10^9 M_{\odot}$. The Balmer decrement inferred from H$\alpha$/H$\gamma$ is used to dust correct the H$\alpha$ emission, yielding $\mbox{SFR(H}\alpha)=320^{+190}_{-140} M_{\odot}\mbox{ yr}^{-1}$. These $M_*$ and SFR values place GOODSN-17940 an order of magnitude in SFR above the $z\sim 4$ star-forming "main sequence." Finally, we use the observed ratio of [NeIII]/[OII] to estimate the nebular oxygen abundance in GOODSN-17940, finding $\mbox{O/H}\sim 0.2 \mbox{ (O/H)}_{\odot}$. Combining our new [NeIII]/[OII] measurement with those from stacked spectra at $z\sim 0, 2, \mbox{ and } 3$, we show that GOODSN-17940 represents an extension to $z>4$ of the evolution towards higher [NeIII]/[OII] (i.e., lower $\mbox{O/H}$) at fixed stellar mass. It will be possible to perform the measurements presented here out to $z\sim 10$ using the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) provides an improvement in sensitivity at energies above 10 keV by two orders of magnitude over non-focusing satellites, making it possible to probe deeper into the Galaxy and Universe. Lansbury and collaborators recently completed a catalog of 497 sources serendipitously detected in the 3-24 keV band using 13 deg2 of NuSTAR coverage. Here, we report on an optical and X-ray study of 16 Galactic sources in the catalog. We identify eight of them as stars (but some or all could have binary companions), and use information from Gaia to report distances and X-ray luminosities for three of them. There are four CVs or CV candidates, and we argue that NuSTAR J233426-2343.9 is a relatively strong CV candidate based partly on an X-ray spectrum from XMM-Newton. NuSTAR J092418-3142.2, which is the brightest serendipitous source in the Lansbury catalog, and NuSTAR J073959-3147.8 are LMXB candidates, but it is also possible that these two sources are CVs. One of the sources is a known HMXB, and NuSTAR J105008-5958.8 is a new HMXB candidate, which has strong Balmer emission lines in its optical spectrum and a hard X-ray spectrum. We discuss the implications of finding these HMXBs for the surface density (logN-logS) and luminosity function of Galactic HMXBs. We conclude that, with the large fraction of unclassified sources in the Galactic plane detected by NuSTAR in the 8-24 keV band, there could be a significant population of low luminosity HMXBs.
  • We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on the identification, selection biases, and host galaxy properties of 55 X-ray, IR and optically-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at $1.4 < z < 3.8$. We obtain rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies and AGN and use the BPT diagram to identify optical AGN. We examine the uniqueness and overlap of the AGN identified at different wavelengths. There is a strong bias against identifying AGN at any wavelength in low mass galaxies, and an additional bias against identifying IR AGN in the most massive galaxies. AGN hosts span a wide range of star formation rate (SFR), similar to inactive galaxies once stellar mass selection effects are accounted for. However, we find (at $\sim 2-3\sigma$ significance) that IR AGN are in less dusty galaxies with relatively higher SFR and optical AGN in dusty galaxies with relatively lower SFR. X-ray AGN selection does not display a bias with host galaxy SFR. These results are consistent with those from larger studies at lower redshifts. Within star-forming galaxies, once selection biases are accounted for, we find AGN in galaxies with similar physical properties as inactive galaxies, with no evidence for AGN activity in particular types of galaxies. This is consistent with AGN being fueled stochastically in any star-forming host galaxy. We do not detect a significant correlation between SFR and AGN luminosity for individual AGN hosts, which may indicate the timescale difference between the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes.
  • The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of two instruments for the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena). In this paper we summarise three of the many key science objectives for the WFI - the formation and growth of supermassive black holes, non-gravitational heating in clusters of galaxies, and spin measurements of stellar mass black holes - and describe their translation into the science requirements and ultimately instrument requirements. The WFI will be designed to provide excellent point source sensitivity and grasp for performing wide area surveys, surface brightness sensitivity, survey power, and absolute temperature and density calibration for in-depth studies of the outskirts of nearby clusters of galaxies and very good high-count rate capability, throughput, and low pile-up, paired with very good spectral resolution, for detailed explorations of bright Galactic compact objects.
  • We measure the clustering of X-ray, radio, and mid-IR-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 0.2 < z < 1.2 using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRIMUS and DEEP2 redshift surveys, covering 7 separate fields spanning ~10 square degrees. Using the cross-correlation of AGN with dense galaxy samples, we measure the clustering scale length and slope, as well as the bias, of AGN selected at different wavelengths. Similar to previous studies, we find that X-ray and radio AGN are more clustered than mid-IR-selected AGN. We further compare the clustering of each AGN sample with matched galaxy samples designed to have the same stellar mass, star formation rate, and redshift distributions as the AGN host galaxies and find no significant differences between their clustering properties. The observed differences in the clustering of AGN selected at different wavelengths can therefore be explained by the clustering differences of their host populations, which have different distributions in both stellar mass and star formation rate. Selection biases inherent in AGN selection, therefore, determine the clustering of observed AGN samples. We further find no significant difference between the clustering of obscured and unobscured AGN, using IRAC or WISE colors or X-ray hardness ratio.
  • We examine the host morphologies of heavily obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) at $z\sim1$ to test whether obscured supermassive black hole growth at this epoch is preferentially linked to galaxy mergers. Our sample consists of 154 obscured AGN with $N_{\rm H}>10^{23.5}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $z<1.5$. Using visual classifications, we compare the morphologies of these AGN to control samples of moderately obscured ($10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ $<N_{\rm H}< 10^{23.5}$ cm$^{-2}$) and unobscured ($N_{\rm H}<10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) AGN. These control AGN are matched in redshift and intrinsic X-ray luminosity to our heavily obscured AGN. We find that heavily obscured AGN at z~1 are twice as likely to be hosted by late-type galaxies relative to unobscured AGN ($65.3^{+4.1}_{-4.6}\%$ vs $34.5^{+2.9}_{-2.7}\%$) and three times as likely to exhibit merger or interaction signatures ($21.5^{+4.2}_{-3.3}\%$ vs $7.8^{+1.9}_{-1.3}\%$). The increased merger fraction is significant at the 3.8$\sigma$ level. We also find that the incidence of point-like morphologies is inversely proportional to obscuration. If we exclude all point sources and consider only extended hosts, we find the correlation between merger fraction and obscuration is still evident, however at a reduced statistical significance ($2.5\sigma$). The fact that we observe a different disk/spheroid fraction versus obscuration indicates that viewing angle cannot be the only thing differentiating our three AGN samples, as a simple unification model would suggest. The increased fraction of disturbed morphologies with obscuration supports an evolutionary scenario, in which Compton-thick AGN are a distinct phase of obscured SMBH growth following a merger/interaction event. Our findings also suggest that some of the merger-triggered SMBH growth predicted by recent AGN fueling models may be hidden among the heavily obscured, Compton-thick population.
  • We study the evidence for a connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGN and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGN with $10^{41}<L_\mathrm{X}<10^{44} $ erg s$^{-1}$ at $0.2 < z < 1.2$ in the PRIMUS redshift survey. We find AGN in galaxies with a wide range of SFR at a given $L_X$. We do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous $L_X$ for star forming AGN host galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean $L_\mathrm{X}$ and SFR of detected AGN in star forming galaxies, which likely reflects that $L_\mathrm{X}$ varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We find no correlation between stellar mass and $L_\mathrm{X}$ within the AGN population. Within both populations of star forming and quiescent galaxies, we find a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Furthermore, at a given stellar mass, we find a star forming galaxy $\sim2-3$ more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGN, but AGN are often hosted by quiescent galaxies.
  • We present new measurements of the evolution of the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of unabsorbed and absorbed Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) out to z~5. We construct samples containing 2957 sources detected at hard (2-7 keV) X-ray energies and 4351 sources detected at soft (0.5-2 keV) energies from a compilation of Chandra surveys supplemented by wide-area surveys from ASCA} and ROSAT. We consider the hard and soft X-ray samples separately and find that the XLF based on either (initially neglecting absorption effects) is best described by a new flexible model parametrization where the break luminosity, normalization and faint-end slope all evolve with redshift. We then incorporate absorption effects, separately modelling the evolution of the XLFs of unabsorbed ($20<\log N_\mathrm{H}<22$) and absorbed ($22<\log N_\mathrm{H}<24$) AGNs, seeking a model that can reconcile both the hard- and soft-band samples. We find that the absorbed AGN XLF has a lower break luminosity, a higher normalization, and a steeper faint-end slope than the unabsorbed AGN XLF out to z~2. Hence, absorbed AGNs dominate at low luminosities, with the absorbed fraction falling rapidly as luminosity increases. Both XLFs undergo strong luminosity evolution which shifts the transition in the absorbed fraction to higher luminosities at higher redshifts. The evolution in the shape of the total XLF is primarily driven by the changing mix of unabsorbed and absorbed populations.
  • Using data from the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey and the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey we obtain stacked X-ray maps of galaxies at 0.7 < z < 1.0 as a function of stellar mass. We compute the total X-ray counts of these galaxies and show that in the soft band (0.5--2,kev) there exists a significant correlation between galaxy X-ray counts and stellar mass at these redshifts. The best-fit relation between X-ray counts and stellar mass can be characterized by a power law with a slope of 0.58 +/- 0.1. We do not find any correlation between stellar mass and X-ray luminosities in the hard (2--7,kev) and ultra-hard (4--7,kev) bands. The derived hardness ratios of our galaxies suggest that the X-ray emission is degenerate between two spectral models, namely point-like power-law emission and extended plasma emission in the interstellar medium. This is similar to what has been observed in low redshift galaxies. Using a simple spectral model where half of the emission comes from power-law sources and the other half from the extended hot halo we derive the X-ray luminosities of our galaxies. The soft X-ray luminosities of our galaxies lie in the range 10^39-8x10^40, ergs/s. Dividing our galaxy sample by the criteria U-B > 1, we find no evidence that our results for X-ray scaling relations depend on optical color.
  • In this paper we present the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. The MOSDEF survey aims to obtain moderate-resolution (R=3000-3650) rest-frame optical spectra (~3700-7000 Angstrom) for ~1500 galaxies at 1.37<z<3.80 in three well-studied CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-N. Targets are selected in three redshift intervals: 1.37<z<1.70, 2.09<z<2.61, and 2.95<z<3.80, down to fixed H_AB (F160W) magnitudes of 24.0, 24.5 and 25.0, respectively, using the photometric and spectroscopic catalogs from the 3D-HST survey. We target both strong nebular emission lines (e.g., [OII], Hbeta, [OIII], 5008, Halpha, [NII], and [SII]) and stellar continuum and absorption features (e.g., Balmer lines, Ca-II H and K, Mgb, 4000 Angstrom break). Here we present an overview of our survey, the observational strategy, the data reduction and analysis, and the sample characteristics based on spectra obtained during the first 24 nights. To date, we have completed 21 masks, obtaining spectra for 591 galaxies. For ~80% of the targets we derive a robust redshift from either emission or absorption lines. In addition, we confirm 55 additional galaxies, which were serendipitously detected. The MOSDEF galaxy sample includes unobscured star-forming, dusty star-forming, and quiescent galaxies and spans a wide range in stellar mass (~10^9-10^11.5 Msol) and star formation rate (~10^0-10^3 Msol/yr). The spectroscopically confirmed sample is roughly representative of an H-band limited galaxy sample at these redshifts. With its large sample size, broad diversity in galaxy properties, and wealth of available ancillary data, MOSDEF will transform our understanding of the stellar, gaseous, metal, dust, and black hole content of galaxies during the time when the universe was most active.
  • We aim to constrain the evolution of AGN as a function of obscuration using an X-ray selected sample of $\sim2000$ AGN from a multi-tiered survey including the CDFS, AEGIS-XD, COSMOS and XMM-XXL fields. The spectra of individual X-ray sources are analysed using a Bayesian methodology with a physically realistic model to infer the posterior distribution of the hydrogen column density and intrinsic X-ray luminosity. We develop a novel non-parametric method which allows us to robustly infer the distribution of the AGN population in X-ray luminosity, redshift and obscuring column density, relying only on minimal smoothness assumptions. Our analysis properly incorporates uncertainties from low count spectra, photometric redshift measurements, association incompleteness and the limited sample size. We find that obscured AGN with $N_{H}>{\rm 10^{22}\, cm^{-2}}$ account for ${77}^{+4}_{-5}\%$ of the number density and luminosity density of the accretion SMBH population with $L_{{\rm X}}>10^{43}\text{ erg/s}$, averaged over cosmic time. Compton-thick AGN account for approximately half the number and luminosity density of the obscured population, and ${38}^{+8}_{-7}\%$ of the total. We also find evidence that the evolution is obscuration-dependent, with the strongest evolution around $N_{H}\thickapprox10^{23}\text{ cm}^{-2}$. We highlight this by measuring the obscured fraction in Compton-thin AGN, which increases towards $z\sim3$, where it is $25\%$ higher than the local value. In contrast the fraction of Compton-thick AGN is consistent with being constant at $\approx35\%$, independent of redshift and accretion luminosity. We discuss our findings in the context of existing models and conclude that the observed evolution is to first order a side-effect of anti-hierarchical growth.
  • We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on rest-frame optical AGN identification and completeness at z~2.3. With our sample of 50 galaxies and 10 X-ray and IR-selected AGN with measured H-beta, [OIII], H-alpha, and [NII] emission lines, we investigate the location of AGN in the BPT, MEx (mass-excitation), and CEx (color-excitation) diagrams. We find that the BPT diagram works well to identify AGN at z~2.3 and that the z~0 AGN/star-forming galaxy classifications do not need to shift substantially at z~2.3 to robustly separate these populations. However, the MEx diagram fails to identify all of the AGN identified in the BPT diagram, and the CEx diagram is substantially contaminated at high redshift. We further show that AGN samples selected using the BPT diagram have selection biases in terms of both host stellar mass and stellar population, in that AGN in low mass and/or high specific star formation rate galaxies are difficult to identify using the BPT diagram. These selection biases become increasingly severe at high redshift, such that optically-selected AGN samples at high redshift will necessarily be incomplete. We also find that the gas in the narrow-line region appears to be more enriched than gas in the host galaxy for at least some MOSDEF AGN. However, AGN at z~2 are generally less enriched than local AGN with the same host stellar mass.
  • We analyse the stellar populations in the host galaxies of 53 X-ray selected optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 0.34<z<1.07 with ultra-deep (m=26.5) optical medium-band (R~50) photometry from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS). The spectral resolution of SHARDS allows us to consistently measure the strength of the 4000 AA break, Dn(4000), a reliable age indicator for stellar populations. We confirm that most X-ray selected moderate-luminosity AGN (L_X<10^44 erg/s) are hosted by massive galaxies (typically M*>10^10.5 M_sun) and that the observed fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN increases with the stellar mass. A careful selection of random control samples of inactive galaxies allows us to remove the stellar mass and redshift dependencies of the AGN fraction to explore trends with several stellar age indicators. We find no significant differences in the distribution of the rest-frame U-V colour for AGN hosts and inactive galaxies, in agreement with previous results. However, we find significantly shallower 4000 AA breaks in AGN hosts, indicative of younger stellar populations. With the help of a model-independent determination of the extinction, we obtain extinction-corrected U-V colours and light-weighted average stellar ages. We find that AGN hosts have younger stellar populations and higher extinction compared to inactive galaxies with the same stellar mass and at the same redshift. We find a highly significant excess of AGN hosts with Dn(4000)~1.4 and light weighted average stellar ages of 300-500 Myr, as well as a deficit of AGN in intrinsic red galaxies. We interpret failure in recognising these trends in previous studies as a consequence of the balancing effect in observed colours of the age-extinction degeneracy.
  • We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2<z<1.0 in the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, xi(rp,pi) and wp(rp), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over 130,000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 sq. deg. of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1<rp<1 Mpc/h) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values between b_gal=0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z=1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.
  • We present a study of Spitzer/IRAC and X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selection techniques in order to quantify the overlap, uniqueness, contamination, and completeness of each. We investigate how the overlap and possible contamination of the samples depends on the IR and X-ray depths. We use Spitzer/IRAC imaging, Chandra and XMM X-ray imaging, and PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) spectroscopic redshifts to construct galaxy and AGN samples at 0.2<z<1.2 over 8 deg^2. We construct samples over a wide range of IRAC flux limits (SWIRE to GOODS depth) and X-ray flux limits (10 ks to 2 Ms). We compare IR-AGN samples defined using the IRAC color selection of Stern et al. and Donley et al. with X-ray detected AGN samples. For roughly similar depth IR and X-ray surveys, we find that ~75% of IR-AGN are identified as X-ray AGN. This fraction increases to ~90% when comparing against the deepest X-ray data, indicating that only ~10% of IR-selected AGN may be heavily obscured. The IR-AGN selection proposed by Stern et al. suffers from contamination by star-forming galaxies at various redshifts when using deeper IR data, though the selection technique works well for shallow IR data. While similar overall, the IR-AGN samples preferentially contain more luminous AGN, while the X-ray AGN samples preferentially contain lower specific accretion rate AGN, where the host galaxy light dominates at IR wavelengths. The host galaxy populations of the IR and X-ray AGN samples have similar restframe colors and stellar masses; both selections identify AGN in blue, star-forming and red, quiescent galaxies.
  • We present an observationally motivated model to connect the AGN and galaxy populations at 0.2<z<1.0 and predict the AGN X-ray luminosity function (XLF). We start with measurements of the stellar mass function of galaxies (from the Prism Multi-object Survey) and populate galaxies with AGNs using models for the probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Our model is based on measurements indicating that the specific accretion rate distribution is a universal function across a wide range of host stellar mass with slope gamma_1 = -0.65 and an overall normalization that evolves with redshift. We test several simple assumptions to extend this model to high specific accretion rates (beyond the measurements) and compare the predictions for the XLF with the observed data. We find good agreement with a model that allows for a break in the specific accretion rate distribution at a point corresponding to the Eddington limit, a steep power-law tail to super-Eddington ratios with slope gamma_2 = -2.1 +0.3 -0.5, and a scatter of 0.38 dex in the scaling between black hole and host stellar mass. Our results show that samples of low luminosity AGNs are dominated by moderately massive galaxies (M* ~ 10^{10-11} M_sun) growing with a wide range of accretion rates due to the shape of the galaxy stellar mass function rather than a preference for AGN activity at a particular stellar mass. Luminous AGNs may be a severely skewed population with elevated black hole masses relative to their host galaxies and in rare phases of rapid accretion.
  • A crucial challenge in astrophysics over the coming decades will be to understand the origins of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that lie at the centres of most, if not all, galaxies. The processes responsible for the initial formation of these SMBHs and their early growth via accretion - when they are seen as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) - remain unknown. To address this challenge, we must identify low luminosity and obscured z>6 AGNs, which represent the bulk of early SMBH growth. Sensitive X-ray observations are a unique signpost of accretion activity, uncontaminated by star formation processes, which prevent reliable AGN identification at other wavelengths (e.g. optical, infrared). The Athena+ Wide Field Imager will enable X-ray surveys to be carried out two orders of magnitude faster than with Chandra or XMM-Newton, opening a new discovery space and identifying over 400 z>6 AGN, including obscured sources. Athena+ will also play a fundamental role to enhance the scientific return of future multiwavelength facilities that will probe the physical conditions within the host galaxies of early SMBHs, which is vital for understanding how SMBHs form, what fuels their subsequent growth, and to assess their impact on the early Universe. Follow-up of samples of z>6 galaxies with the Athena+ X-ray Integral Field Unit could also reveal the presence of highly obscured AGNs, thanks to the detection of strong iron lines. Thus, Athena+ will enable the first quantitative measurements of the extent and distribution of SMBH accretion in the early Universe.
  • The PRIsm MUti-object Survey (PRIMUS) is a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey to z~1 completed with a low-dispersion prism and slitmasks allowing for simultaneous observations of ~2,500 objects over 0.18 square degrees. The final PRIMUS catalog includes ~130,000 robust redshifts over 9.1 sq. deg. In this paper, we summarize the PRIMUS observational strategy and present the data reduction details used to measure redshifts, redshift precision, and survey completeness. The survey motivation, observational techniques, fields, target selection, slitmask design, and observations are presented in Coil et al 2010. Comparisons to existing higher-resolution spectroscopic measurements show a typical precision of sigma_z/(1+z)=0.005. PRIMUS, both in area and number of redshifts, is the largest faint galaxy redshift survey completed to date and is allowing for precise measurements of the relationship between AGNs and their hosts, the effects of environment on galaxy evolution, and the build up of galactic systems over the latter half of cosmic history.
  • We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L_{2-10 keV}=10^{42-44} erg /s within a parent sample of ~25,000 galaxies at 0.2<z<1.0 over ~3.4 deg^2 and to i~23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5<log M_*/M_sun<12 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z~1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor~2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.
  • We present Keck/LRIS-B spectra for a sample of ten AEGIS X-ray AGN host galaxies and thirteen post-starburst galaxies from SDSS and DEEP2 at 0.2<z<0.8 in order to investigate the presence, properties, and influence of outflowing galactic winds at intermediate redshifts. We focus on galaxies that either host a low-luminosity AGN or have recently had their star formation quenched to test whether these galaxies have winds of sufficient velocity to potentially clear gas from the galaxy. We find, using absorption features of Fe II, Mg II, and Mg I, that six of the ten (60%) X-ray AGN host galaxies and four of the thirteen (31%) post-starburst galaxies have outflowing galactic winds, with typical velocities of ~200 km/s. We additionally find that most of the galaxies in our sample show line emission, possibly from the wind, in either Fe II* or Mg II. A total of 100% of our X-ray AGN host sample (including four red sequence galaxies) and 77% of our post-starburst sample has either blueshifted absorption or line emission. Several K+A galaxies have small amounts of cool gas absorption at the systemic velocity, indicating that not all of the cool gas has been expelled. We conclude that while outflowing galactic winds are common in both X-ray low-luminosity AGN host galaxies and post-starburst galaxies at intermediate redshifts, the winds are likely driven by supernovae (as opposed to AGN) and do not appear to have sufficiently high velocities to quench star formation in these galaxies.
  • We present the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS), a spectroscopic faint galaxy redshift survey to z~1. PRIMUS uses a low-dispersion prism and slitmasks to observe ~2,500 objects at once in a 0.18 deg^2 field of view, using the IMACS camera on the Magellan I Baade 6.5m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. PRIMUS covers a total of 9.1 deg^2 of sky to a depth of i_AB~23.5 in seven different deep, multi-wavelength fields that have coverage from GALEX, Spitzer and either XMM or Chandra, as well as multiple-band optical and near-IR coverage. PRIMUS includes ~130,000 robust redshifts of unique objects with a redshift precision of dz/(1+z)~0.005. The redshift distribution peaks at z=0.6 and extends to z=1.2 for galaxies and z=5 for broad-line AGN. The motivation, observational techniques, fields, target selection, slitmask design, and observations are presented here, with a brief summary of the redshift precision; a companion paper presents the data reduction, redshift fitting, redshift confidence, and survey completeness. PRIMUS is the largest faint galaxy survey undertaken to date. The high targeting fraction (~80%) and large survey size will allow for precise measures of galaxy properties and large-scale structure to z~1.
  • We develop a new diagnostic method to classify galaxies into AGN hosts, star-forming galaxies, and absorption-dominated galaxies by combining the [O III]/Hbeta ratio with rest-frame U-B color. This can be used to robustly select AGNs in galaxy samples at intermediate redshifts (z<1). We compare the result of this optical AGN selection with X-ray selection using a sample of 3150 galaxies with 0.3<z<0.8 and I_AB<22, selected from the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey and the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). Among the 146 X-ray sources in this sample, 58% are classified optically as emission-line AGNs, the rest as star-forming galaxies or absorption-dominated galaxies. The latter are also known as "X-ray bright, optically normal galaxies" (XBONGs). Analysis of the relationship between optical emission lines and X-ray properties shows that the completeness of optical AGN selection suffers from dependence on the star formation rate and the quality of observed spectra. It also shows that XBONGs do not appear to be a physically distinct population from other X-ray detected, emission-line AGNs. On the other hand, X-ray AGN selection also has strong bias. About 2/3 of all emission-line AGNs at L_bol>10^44 erg/s in our sample are not detected in our 200 ks Chandra images, most likely due to moderate or heavy absorption by gas near the AGN. The 2--7 keV detection rate of Seyfert 2s at z~0.6 suggests that their column density distribution and Compton-thick fraction are similar to that of local Seyferts. Multiple sample selection techniques are needed to obtain as complete a sample as possible.
  • The broad band spectra of two Swift/BAT AGNs obtained from Suzaku follow-up observations are studied: NGC 612 and NGC 3081. Fitting with standard models, we find that both sources show similar spectra characterized by a heavy absorption with $N_{\rm{H}} \simeq 10^{24} \ \rm{cm}^{-2}$, the fraction of scattered light is $f_{\rm{scat}} = 0.5-0.8%$, and the solid angle of the reflection component is $\Omega/2\pi = 0.4-1.1$. To investigate the geometry of the torus, we apply numerical spectral models utilizing Monte Carlo simulations by Ikeda et al. (2009) to the Suzaku spectra. We find our data are well explained by this torus model, which has four geometrical parameters. The fit results suggest that NGC 612 has the torus half opening-angle of $\simeq 60^{\circ}-70^{\circ}$ and is observed from a nearly edge-on angle with a small amount of scattering gas, while NGC 3081 has a very small opening angle $\simeq 15^\circ$ and is observed on a face-on geometry, more like the deeply buried "new type" AGNs found by Ueda et al. (2007). We demonstrate the potential power of direct application of such numerical simulations to the high quality broad band spectra to unveil the inner structure of AGNs.