• How impulsive magnetic energy release leads to solar eruptions and how those eruptions are energized and evolve are vital unsolved problems in Heliophysics. The standard model for solar eruptions summarizes our current understanding of these events. Magnetic energy in the corona is released through drastic restructuring of the magnetic field via reconnection. Electrons and ions are then accelerated by poorly understood processes. Theories include contracting loops, merging magnetic islands, stochastic acceleration, and turbulence at shocks, among others. Although this basic model is well established, the fundamental physics is poorly understood. HXR observations using grazing-incidence focusing optics can now probe all of the key regions of the standard model. These include two above-the-looptop (ALT) sources which bookend the reconnection region and are likely the sites of particle acceleration and direct heating. The science achievable by a direct HXR imaging instrument can be summarized by the following science questions and objectives which are some of the most outstanding issues in solar physics (1) How are particles accelerated at the Sun? (1a) Where are electrons accelerated and on what time scales? (1b) What fraction of electrons is accelerated out of the ambient medium? (2) How does magnetic energy release on the Sun lead to flares and eruptions? A Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) instrument, which can be built now using proven technology and at modest cost, would enable revolutionary advancements in our understanding of impulsive magnetic energy release and particle acceleration, a process which is known to occur at the Sun but also throughout the Universe.
  • Even in the absence of resolved flares, the corona is heated to several million degrees. However, despite its importance for the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the solar atmosphere, the origin of this heating remains poorly understood. Several observational and theoretical considerations suggest that the heating is driven by small, impulsive energy bursts which could be Parker-style "nanoflares" (Parker 1988) that arise via reconnection within the tangled and twisted coronal magnetic field. The classical "smoking gun" (Klimchuk 2009; Cargill et al. 2013) for impulsive heating is the direct detection of widespread hot plasma (T > 6 MK) with a low emission measure. In recent years there has been great progress in the development of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters that make them more ideal for studying the Sun. When combined with grazing-incidence focusing optics, they provide direct spectroscopic imaging over a broad energy band (0.5 to 10 keV) combined with extremely impressive energy resolution in small pixels, as low as 0.7 eV (FWHM) at 1.5 keV (Lee 2015), and 1.56 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV (Smith 2012), two orders of magnitude better than the current best traditional solid state photon-counting spectrometers. Decisive observations of the hot plasma associated with nanoflare models of coronal heating can be provided by new solar microcalorimeters. These measurements will cover the most important part of the coronal spectrum for searching for the nanoflare-related hot plasma and will characterize how much nanoflares can heat the corona both in active regions and the quiet Sun. Finally, microcalorimeters will enable to study all of this as a function of time and space in each pixel simultaneously a capability never before available.
  • Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding ~ 50 km/s. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it to that of the line core which corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe XIV lines at 264.78 and 274.20 A is used to determine wing and core densities. We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe XIV lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.