• We compare eighteen binary systems with precisely determined radii and masses from 23 to 1.1 M_sol, and stellar evolution models produced with our newly revised code TYCHO. ``Overshooting'' and rotational mixing were suppressed in order to establish a baseline for isolating these and other hydrodynamic effects. Acceptable coeval fits are found for sixteen pairs without optimizing for heavy element or helium abundance. The precision of these tests is limited by the accuracies of the observed effective temperatures. High dispersion spectra and detailed atmospheric modeling should give more accurate effective temperatures and heavy element abundances. PV Cas, a peculiar early A system, EK Cep B, a known post-T Tauri star, and RS Cha, a member of a young OB association, are matched by pre-main sequence models. Predicted mass loss agrees with upper limits from IUE for CW Cep A and B. Relatively poor fits are obtained for binaries having at least one component in the mass range 1.7 < M/M_sol <2.6, whose evolution is sensitive to mixing. These discrepancies are robust and consistent with additional mixing in real stars. The predicted apsidal motion implies that massive star models are systematically less centrally condensed than the real stars. If these effects are due to overshooting, then the overshooting parameter alpha_OV increases with stellar mass. The apsidal motion constants are controlled by radiative opacity under conditions close to those directly measured in laser experiments, making this test more stringent than possible before.
  • The blue star reported in the field of the young LMC cluster NGC1818 by Elson et al. (1998) has the wrong luminosity and radius to be a "luminous white dwarf" member of the cluster. In addition, unless the effective temperature quoted by the authors is a drastic underestimate, the luminosity is much too low for it to be a cluster member in the post-AGB phase. Other possibilities, including that of binary evolution, are briefly discussed. However, the implication that the massive main sequence turnoff stars in this cluster can produce white dwarfs (instead of neutron stars) from single-star evolution needs to be reconsidered.
  • Astrophysical objects below the stellar mass limit but well above the mass of Jupiter eluded discovery for nearly three decades after Kumar first proposed their existence, and for two decades after Tarter proposed the name "brown dwarfs." The first unambiguous discoveries of planetary (51 Peg B) and brown dwarf (Gliese 229B) companions occurred about three years ago. Yet while extrasolar planets are now being discovered at a breathtaking rate, brown dwarf companions to ordinary stars are apparently rare; likewise imaging surveys show that GL229B is still unique as a distant companion to a low mass star. On the other hand, the deep imaging studies of the Pleiades and several imbedded young clusters show that the mass function (ie. of single objects) extends in substantial numbers down to at least 40 Jupiter masses. The high mass / stellar density Orion Nebula Cluster may have relatively fewer low mass objects. In the field of the solar neighborhood, the infrared sky surveys DENIS and especially 2MASS show that brown dwarfs, certified by the lithium test, exist in significant numbers. These appear to include most of the newly-defined spectroscopic class of L dwarfs. These objects are cooler than, and with different atomic and molecular absorption features than the late M dwarfs. If the first 1% of sky analyzed is not atypical, over a thousand L dwarfs should be detected in the 2MASS survey.