• We have used the Submillimeter Array at 860$\,\mu$m to observe the brightest SCUBA-2 sources in 4$\,$deg$^{2}$ of the Cosmology Legacy Survey. We have targeted 75 of the brightest single-dish SCUBA-2 850$\,\mu$m sources down to $S_{850}\,{\approx}\,8\,$mJy, achieving an average synthesized beam of 2.4$^{\prime\prime}$ and an average rms of $\sigma_{860}\,{=}\,1.5\,$mJy in our primary beam-corrected maps. We searched our maps for $4\sigma$ peaks, corresponding to $S_{860}\,{\gtrsim}\,6\,$mJy sources, and detected 59 single galaxies and three pairs of galaxies. We include in our study 28 archival observations, bringing our sample size to 103 bright single-dish submillimetre sources with interferometric follow-up. We compute the cumulative and differential number counts of our sample, finding them to overlap with previous single-dish survey number counts within the uncertainties, although our cumulative number count is systematically lower than the parent SCUBA-2 cumulative number count by $24\,{\pm}\,6$ per cent between 11 and 15$\,$mJy. We estimate the probability that a ${\gtrsim}\,10\,$mJy single-dish submillimetre source resolves into two or more galaxies with similar flux densities, causing a significant change in the number counts, to be about 15 per cent. Assuming the remaining 85 per cent of the targets are ultra-luminous starburst galaxies between $z\,{=}\,2$-3, we find a likely volume density of ${\gtrsim}\,400\,$M$_{\odot}\,$yr$^{-1}$ sources to be ${\sim}\,3^{+0.7}_{-0.6}\,{\times}\,10^{-7}\,$Mpc$^{-3}$. We show that the descendants of these galaxies could be ${\gtrsim}\,4\,{\times}\,10^{11}\,$M$_{\odot}$ local quiescent galaxies, and that about 10 per cent of their total stellar mass would have formed during these short bursts of star-formation.
  • The SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES) is a three-year JCMT Large Program aiming at reaching the 450 $\mu$m confusion limit in the COSMOS-CANDELS region, to study a representative sample of the high-redshift far-infrared galaxy population that gives rise to the bulk of the far-infrared background. We present the first-year data from STUDIES. We have reached a 450 $\mu$m noise level of 0.91~mJy for point sources at the map center, covered an area of 151 arcmin$^2$, and detected 98 and 141 sources at 4.0 and 3.5 $\sigma$, respectively. Our derived counts are best constrained in the 3.5-25 mJy regime using directly detected sources. Below the detection limits, our fluctuation analysis further constrains the slope of the counts down to 1 mJy. The resulting counts at 1-25 mJy are consistent with a power law having a slope of $-2.59$ ($\pm0.10$ for 3.5-25 mJy, and $^{+0.4}_{-0.7}$ for 1-3.5 mJy). There is no evidence of a faint-end termination or turn-over of the counts in this flux density range. Our counts are also consistent with previous SCUBA-2 blank-field and lensing cluster surveys. The integrated surface brightness from our counts down to 1 mJy is $90.0\pm17.2$ Jy deg$^{-2}$, which can account for up to $83^{+15}_{-16}\%$ of the COBE 450 $\mu$m background. We show that Herschel counts at 350 and 500 $\mu$m are significantly higher than our 450 $\mu$m counts, likely caused by its large beam and source clustering. High-angular resolution instruments like SCUBA-2 at 450 $\mu$m are therefore highly beneficial for measuring the luminosity and spatial density of high-redshift dusty galaxies.
  • Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre ($850\mu$m) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/IR selection to analyse a sample of 914 SMGs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter halos (M$_{\text{halo}} >10^{13}$M$_{\odot}$) at redshifts $z > 2.5$, consistent with being the progenitors of massive quiescent galaxies in present-day galaxy clusters. We also find evidence of downsizing, in which SMG activity shifts to lower mass halos at lower redshifts. In terms of their clustering and halo masses, SMGs appear to be consistent with other star-forming galaxies at a given redshift.
  • The properties of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) that are fainter than the confusion limit of blank-field single-dish surveys ($S_{850} \lesssim$ 2 mJy) are poorly constrained. Using a newly developed color selection technique, Optical-Infrared Triple Color (OIRTC), that has been shown to successfully {select} such faint SMGs, we identify a sample of 2938 OIRTC-selected galaxies, dubbed Triple Color Galaxies (TCGs), in the UKIDSS-UDS field. We show that these galaxies have a median 850 $\mu$m flux of S$_{850} = 0.96\pm0.04$ mJy (equivalent to a star-formation rate SFR $\sim60-100$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ based on SED fitting), representing the first large sample of faint SMGs that bridges the gap between bright SMGs and normal star-forming galaxies in S$_{850}$ and $L_{\rm IR}$. We assess the basic properties of TCGs and their relationship with other galaxy populations at $z\sim2$. We measure the two-point autocorrelation function for this population and derive a typical halo mass of log$_{10}$(M$_{\rm halo}$) $=12.9^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$, $12.7^{+0.1}_{-0.2}$, and $12.9^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$ $h^{-1}$M$_\odot$ at $z=1-2$, $2-3$, and $3-5$, respectively. Together with the bright SMGs (S$_{850} \gtrsim 2$ mJy) and a comparison sample of less far-infrared luminous star-forming galaxies, we find a lack of dependence between spatial clustering and S$_{850}$ (or SFR), suggesting that the difference between these populations may lie in their local galactic environment. Lastly, on the scale of $\sim8-17$ kpc at $1<z<5$ we find a tentative enhancement of the clustering of TCGs over the comparison star-forming galaxies, suggesting that some faint SMGs are physically associated pairs, perhaps reflecting a merging origin in their triggering.
  • We present a comparative study of the thermal emission of the transiting exoplanets WASP-1b and WASP-2b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The two planets have very similar masses but suffer different levels of irradiation and are predicted to fall either side of a sharp transition between planets with and without hot stratospheres. WASP-1b is one of the most highly irradiated planets studied to date. We measure planet/star contrast ratios in all four of the IRAC bands for both planets (3.6-8.0um), and our results indicate the presence of a strong temperature inversion in the atmosphere of WASP-1b, particularly apparent at 8um, and no inversion in WASP-2b. In both cases the measured eclipse depths favor models in which incident energy is not redistributed efficiently from the day side to the night side of the planet. We fit the Spitzer light curves simultaneously with the best available radial velocity curves and transit photometry in order to provide updated measurements of system parameters. We do not find significant eccentricity in the orbit of either planet, suggesting that the inflated radius of WASP-1b is unlikely to be the result of tidal heating. Finally, by plotting ratios of secondary eclipse depths at 8um and 4.5um against irradiation for all available planets, we find evidence for a sharp transition in the emission spectra of hot Jupiters at an irradiation level of 2 x 10^9 erg/s/cm^2. We suggest this transition may be due to the presence of TiO in the upper atmospheres of the most strongly irradiated hot Jupiters.