• Ytterbium (Yb) metal is divalent and nonmagnetic but would be expected under sufficient pressure to become trivalent and magnetic. We have carried out electrical resistivity and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements on Yb to pressures as high as 179 GPa over the temperature range 1.4 - 295 K. No evidence for magnetic order is observed. However, above 86 GPa Yb is found to become superconducting near 1.4 K with a transition temperature that increases monotonically with pressure to approximately 4.6 K at 179 GPa. Yb thus becomes the 54th known elemental superconductor.
  • We investigate the hydrostatic pressure dependence of interfacial superconductivity occurring at the atomically sharp interface between two non-superconducting materials: the topological insulator (TI) Bi2Te3 and the parent compound Fe1+yTe of the chalcogenide iron based superconductors. Under pressure, a significant increase in the superconducting transition temperature Tc is observed. We trace the pressure dependence of a superconducting twin gap structure by Andreev reflection point contact spectroscopy (PCARS), which shows that a large superconducting gap associated with the interfacial superconductivity increases along with Tc. A second smaller gap, which is attributed to proximity-induced superconductivity in the TI layer, increases first, but then reaches a maximum and appears to be gradually suppressed at higher pressure. We interpret our data in the context of a pressure-induced doping effect of the interface, in which charge is transferred from the TI layer to the interface and the interfacial superconductivity is enhanced. This demonstrates the important role of the TI in the interfacial superconductivity mechanism.
  • Transport and magnetic studies of PbTaSe$_2$ under pressure suggest existence of two superconducting phases with the low temperature phase boundary at $\sim 0.25$ GPa that is defined by a very sharp, first order, phase transition. The first order phase transition line can be followed via pressure dependent resistivity measurements, and is found to be near 0.12 GPa near room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction at elevated temperatures confirm that this first order phase transition is structural and occurs at ambient pressure near $\sim 425$ K. The new, high temperature / high pressure phase has a similar crystal structure and slightly lower unit cell volume relative to the ambient pressure, room temperature structure. Based on first-principles calculations this structure is suggested to be obtained by shifting the Pb atoms from the $1a$ to $1e$ Wyckoff position without changing the positions of Ta and Se atoms. PbTaSe$_2$ has an exceptionally pressure sensitive, structural phase transition with $\Delta T_s/\Delta P \approx - 1700$ K/GPa near 4 K, this first order transition causes an $\sim 1$ K ($\sim 25 \%$) step - like decrease in $T_c$ as pressure is increased through 0.25 GPa.
  • Studies of the effect of high pressure on superconductivity began in 1925 with the seminal work of Sizoo and Onnes on Sn to 0.03 GPa and have continued up to the present day to pressures in the 200 - 300 GPa range. Such enormous pressures cause profound changes in all condensed matter properties, including superconductivity. In high pressure experiments metallic elements, Tc values have been elevated to temperatures as high as 20 K for Y at 115 GPa and 25 K for Ca at 160 GPa. These pressures are sufficient to turn many insulators into metals and magnetics into superconductors. The changes will be particularly dramatic when the pressure is sufficient to break up one or more atomic shells. Recent results in superconductivity to Mbar pressures wll be discussed which exemplify the progress made in this field over the past 82 years.
  • Experiments under hydrostatic and uniaxial pressure serve not only as a guide in the synthesis of materials with superior superconducting properties but also allow a quantitative test of theoretical models. In this chapter the pressure dependence of the superconducting properties of elemental, binary, and multi-atom superconductors are explored, with an emphasis on those exhibiting relatively high values of the transition temperature Tc. In contrast to the vast majority of superconductors, where Tc decreases under pressure, in the cuprate oxides Tc normally increases. Uniaxial pressure studies give evidence that this increase arises mainly from the reduction in the area of the CuO2 planes (Tc approximately proportional to inverse square area), rather than in the separation between the planes, thus supporting theoretical models which attribute the superconductivity primarily to intraplanar pairing interactions. More detailed information would be provided by future experiments in which the hydrostatic and uniaxial pressure dependences of several basic parameters, such as Tc, the superconducting gap, the pseudo-gap, the carrier concentration, and the exchange interaction are determined for a given material over the full range of doping.
  • The dependence of the superconducting transition temperature T_{c} on nearly hydrostatic pressure has been determined to 67 GPa in an ac susceptibility measurement for a Li sample embedded in helium pressure medium. With increasing pressure, superconductivity appears at 5.47 K for 20.3 GPa, T_{c} rising rapidly to ~ 14 K at 30 GPa. The T_{c}(P)-dependence to 67 GPa differs significantly from that observed in previous studies where no pressure medium was used. Evidence is given that superconductivity in Li competes with symmetry breaking structural phase transitions which occur near 20, 30, and 62 GPa. In the pressure range 20-30 GPa, T_{c} is found to decrease rapidly in a dc magnetic field, the first evidence that Li is a type I superconductor.
  • Superconductivity is an important area of modern research which has benefited enormously from experiments under high pressure conditions. The focus of this paper will be on three classes of high-temperature superconductors: (1) the new binary compound MgB2, (2) the alkali-doped fullerenes, and (3) the cuprate oxides. We will discuss results from experiment and theory which illustrate the kinds of vital information the high-pressure variable can give to help better understand these fascinating materials.