• The matrix logarithm, when applied to Hermitian positive definite matrices, is concave with respect to the positive semidefinite order. This operator concavity property leads to numerous concavity and convexity results for other matrix functions, many of which are of importance in quantum information theory. In this paper we show how to approximate the matrix logarithm with functions that preserve operator concavity and can be described using the feasible regions of semidefinite optimization problems of fairly small size. Such approximations allow us to use off-the-shelf semidefinite optimization solvers for convex optimization problems involving the matrix logarithm and related functions, such as the quantum relative entropy. The basic ingredients of our approach apply, beyond the matrix logarithm, to functions that are operator concave and operator monotone. As such, we introduce strategies for constructing semidefinite approximations that we expect will be useful, more generally, for studying the approximation power of functions with small semidefinite representations.
  • Many important problems are characterized by the eigenvalues of a large matrix. For example, the difficulty of many optimization problems, such as those arising from the fitting of large models in statistics and machine learning, can be investigated via the spectrum of the Hessian of the empirical loss function. Network data can be understood via the eigenstructure of a graph Laplacian matrix using spectral graph theory. Quantum simulations and other many-body problems are often characterized via the eigenvalues of the solution space, as are various dynamic systems. However, naive eigenvalue estimation is computationally expensive even when the matrix can be represented; in many of these situations the matrix is so large as to only be available implicitly via products with vectors. Even worse, one may only have noisy estimates of such matrix vector products. In this work, we combine several different techniques for randomized estimation and show that it is possible to construct unbiased estimators to answer a broad class of questions about the spectra of such implicit matrices, even in the presence of noise. We validate these methods on large-scale problems in which graph theory and random matrix theory provide ground truth.
  • We consider a new and general online resource allocation problem, where the goal is to maximize a function of a positive semidefinite (PSD) matrix with a scalar budget constraint. The problem data arrives online, and the algorithm needs to make an irrevocable decision at each step. Of particular interest are classic experiment design problems in the online setting, with the algorithm deciding whether to allocate budget to each experiment as new experiments become available sequentially. We analyze two greedy primal-dual algorithms and provide bounds on their competitive ratios. Our analysis relies on a smooth surrogate of the objective function that needs to satisfy a new diminishing returns (PSD-DR) property (that its gradient is order-reversing with respect to the PSD cone). Using the representation for monotone maps on the PSD cone given by L\"owner's theorem, we obtain a convex parametrization of the family of functions satisfying PSD-DR. We then formulate a convex optimization problem to directly optimize our competitive ratio bound over this set. This design problem can be solved offline before the data start arriving. The online algorithm that uses the designed smoothing is tailored to the given cost function, and enjoys a competitive ratio at least as good as our optimized bound. We provide examples of computing the smooth surrogate for D-optimal and A-optimal experiment design, and demonstrate the performance of the custom-designed algorithm.
  • If $X$ is an $n\times n$ symmetric matrix, then the directional derivative of $X \mapsto \det(X)$ in the direction $I$ is the elementary symmetric polynomial of degree $n-1$ in the eigenvalues of $X$. This is a polynomial in the entries of $X$ with the property that it is hyperbolic with respect to the direction $I$. The corresponding hyperbolicity cone is a relaxation of the positive semidefinite (PSD) cone known as the first derivative relaxation (or Renegar derivative) of the PSD cone. A spectrahedal cone is a convex cone that has a representation as the intersection of a subspace with the cone of PSD matrices in some dimension. We show that the first derivative relaxation of the PSD cone is a spectrahedral cone, and give an explicit spectrahedral description of size $\binom{n+1}{2}-1$. The construction provides a new explicit example of a hyperbolicity cone that is also a spectrahedron. This is consistent with the generalized Lax conjecture, which conjectures that every hyperbolicity cone is a spectrahedron.
  • It is well-known that any sum of squares (SOS) program can be cast as a semidefinite program (SDP) of a particular structure and that therein lies the computational bottleneck for SOS programs, as the SDPs generated by this procedure are large and costly to solve when the polynomials involved in the SOS programs have a large number of variables and degree. In this paper, we review SOS optimization techniques and present two new methods for improving their computational efficiency. The first method leverages the sparsity of the underlying SDP to obtain computational speed-ups. Further improvements can be obtained if the coefficients of the polynomials that describe the problem have a particular sparsity pattern, called chordal sparsity. The second method bypasses semidefinite programming altogether and relies instead on solving a sequence of more tractable convex programs, namely linear and second order cone programs. This opens up the question as to how well one can approximate the cone of SOS polynomials by second order representable cones. In the last part of the paper, we present some recent negative results related to this question.
  • We consider the problem of finding sum of squares (sos) expressions to establish the non-negativity of a symmetric polynomial over a discrete hypercube whose coordinates are indexed by the $k$-element subsets of $[n]$. For simplicity, we focus on the case $k=2$, but our results extend naturally to all values of $k \geq 2$. We develop a variant of the Gatermann-Parrilo symmetry-reduction method tailored to our setting that allows for several simplifications and a connection to flag algebras. We show that every symmetric polynomial that has a sos expression of a fixed degree also has a succinct sos expression whose size depends only on the degree and not on the number of variables. Our method bypasses much of the technical difficulties needed to apply the Gatermann-Parrilo method, and offers flexibility in obtaining succinct sos expressions that are combinatorially meaningful. As a byproduct of our results, we arrive at a natural representation-theoretic justification for the concept of flags as introduced by Razborov in his flag algebra calculus. Furthermore, this connection exposes a family of non-negative polynomials that cannot be certified with any fixed set of flags, answering a question of Razborov in the context of our finite setting.
  • A famous result of Lieb establishes that the map $(A,B) \mapsto \text{tr}\left[K^* A^{1-t} K B^t\right]$ is jointly concave in the pair $(A,B)$ of positive definite matrices, where $K$ is a fixed matrix and $t \in [0,1]$. In this paper we show that Lieb's function admits an explicit semidefinite programming formulation for any rational $t \in [0,1]$. Our construction makes use of a semidefinite formulation of weighted matrix geometric means. We provide an implementation of our constructions in Matlab.
  • A central question in optimization is to maximize (or minimize) a linear function over a given polytope P. To solve such a problem in practice one needs a concise description of the polytope P. In this paper we are interested in representations of P using the positive semidefinite cone: a positive semidefinite lift (psd lift) of a polytope P is a representation of P as the projection of an affine slice of the positive semidefinite cone $\mathbf{S}^d_+$. Such a representation allows linear optimization problems over P to be written as semidefinite programs of size d. Such representations can be beneficial in practice when d is much smaller than the number of facets of the polytope P. In this paper we are concerned with so-called equivariant psd lifts (also known as symmetric psd lifts) which respect the symmetries of the polytope P. We present a representation-theoretic framework to study equivariant psd lifts of a certain class of symmetric polytopes known as orbitopes. Our main result is a structure theorem where we show that any equivariant psd lift of size d of an orbitope is of sum-of-squares type where the functions in the sum-of-squares decomposition come from an invariant subspace of dimension smaller than d^3. We use this framework to study two well-known families of polytopes, namely the parity polytope and the cut polytope, and we prove exponential lower bounds for equivariant psd lifts of these polytopes.
  • Let G be a finite abelian group. This paper is concerned with nonnegative functions on G that are sparse with respect to the Fourier basis. We establish combinatorial conditions on subsets S and T of Fourier basis elements under which nonnegative functions with Fourier support S are sums of squares of functions with Fourier support T. Our combinatorial condition involves constructing a chordal cover of a graph related to G and S (the Cayley graph Cay($\hat{G}$,S)) with maximal cliques related to T. Our result relies on two main ingredients: the decomposition of sparse positive semidefinite matrices with a chordal sparsity pattern, as well as a simple but key observation exploiting the structure of the Fourier basis elements of G. We apply our general result to two examples. First, in the case where $G = \mathbb{Z}_2^n$, by constructing a particular chordal cover of the half-cube graph, we prove that any nonnegative quadratic form in n binary variables is a sum of squares of functions of degree at most $\lceil n/2 \rceil$, establishing a conjecture of Laurent. Second, we consider nonnegative functions of degree d on $\mathbb{Z}_N$ (when d divides N). By constructing a particular chordal cover of the d'th power of the N-cycle, we prove that any such function is a sum of squares of functions with at most $3d\log(N/d)$ nonzero Fourier coefficients. Dually this shows that a certain cyclic polytope in $\mathbb{R}^{2d}$ with N vertices can be expressed as a projection of a section of the cone of psd matrices of size $3d\log(N/d)$. Putting $N=d^2$ gives a family of polytopes $P_d \subset \mathbb{R}^{2d}$ with LP extension complexity $\text{xc}_{LP}(P_d) = \Omega(d^2)$ and SDP extension complexity $\text{xc}_{PSD}(P_d) = O(d\log(d))$. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first explicit family of polytopes in increasing dimensions where $\text{xc}_{PSD}(P_d) = o(\text{xc}_{LP}(P_d))$.
  • We consider the problem of jointly estimating the attitude and spin-rate of a spinning spacecraft. Psiaki (J. Astronautical Sci., 57(1-2):73--92, 2009) has formulated a family of optimization problems that generalize the classical least-squares attitude estimation problem, known as Wahba's problem, to the case of a spinning spacecraft. If the rotation axis is fixed and known, but the spin-rate is unknown (such as for nutation-damped spin-stabilized spacecraft) we show that Psiaki's problem can be reformulated exactly as a type of tractable convex optimization problem called a semidefinite optimization problem. This reformulation allows us to globally solve the problem using standard numerical routines for semidefinite optimization. It also provides a natural semidefinite relaxation-based approach to more complicated variations on the problem.
  • Given a polytope P in $\mathbb{R}^n$, we say that P has a positive semidefinite lift (psd lift) of size d if one can express P as the linear projection of an affine slice of the positive semidefinite cone $\mathbf{S}^d_+$. If a polytope P has symmetry, we can consider equivariant psd lifts, i.e. those psd lifts that respect the symmetry of P. One of the simplest families of polytopes with interesting symmetries are regular polygons in the plane, which have played an important role in the study of linear programming lifts (or extended formulations). In this paper we study equivariant psd lifts of regular polygons. We first show that the standard Lasserre/sum-of-squares hierarchy for the regular N-gon requires exactly ceil(N/4) iterations and thus yields an equivariant psd lift of size linear in N. In contrast we show that one can construct an equivariant psd lift of the regular 2^n-gon of size 2n-1, which is exponentially smaller than the psd lift of the sum-of-squares hierarchy. Our construction relies on finding a sparse sum-of-squares certificate for the facet-defining inequalities of the regular 2^n-gon, i.e., one that only uses a small (logarithmic) number of monomials. Since any equivariant LP lift of the regular 2^n-gon must have size 2^n, this gives the first example of a polytope with an exponential gap between sizes of equivariant LP lifts and equivariant psd lifts. Finally we prove that our construction is essentially optimal by showing that any equivariant psd lift of the regular N-gon must have size at least logarithmic in N.
  • We give explicit polynomial-sized (in $n$ and $k$) semidefinite representations of the hyperbolicity cones associated with the elementary symmetric polynomials of degree $k$ in $n$ variables. These convex cones form a family of non-polyhedral outer approximations of the non-negative orthant that preserve low-dimensional faces while successively discarding high-dimensional faces. More generally we construct explicit semidefinite representations (polynomial-sized in $k,m$, and $n$) of the hyperbolicity cones associated with $k$th directional derivatives of polynomials of the form $p(x) = \det(\sum_{i=1}^{n}A_i x_i)$ where the $A_i$ are $m\times m$ symmetric matrices. These convex cones form an analogous family of outer approximations to any spectrahedral cone. Our representations allow us to use semidefinite programming to solve the linear cone programs associated with these convex cones as well as their (less well understood) dual cones.
  • We study the convex hull of $SO(n)$, thought of as the set of $n\times n$ orthogonal matrices with unit determinant, from the point of view of semidefinite programming. We show that the convex hull of $SO(n)$ is doubly spectrahedral, i.e. both it and its polar have a description as the intersection of a cone of positive semidefinite matrices with an affine subspace. Our spectrahedral representations are explicit, and are of minimum size, in the sense that there are no smaller spectrahedral representations of these convex bodies.
  • In this paper we establish links between, and new results for, three problems that are not usually considered together. The first is a matrix decomposition problem that arises in areas such as statistical modeling and signal processing: given a matrix $X$ formed as the sum of an unknown diagonal matrix and an unknown low rank positive semidefinite matrix, decompose $X$ into these constituents. The second problem we consider is to determine the facial structure of the set of correlation matrices, a convex set also known as the elliptope. This convex body, and particularly its facial structure, plays a role in applications from combinatorial optimization to mathematical finance. The third problem is a basic geometric question: given points $v_1,v_2,...,v_n\in \R^k$ (where $n > k$) determine whether there is a centered ellipsoid passing \emph{exactly} through all of the points. We show that in a precise sense these three problems are equivalent. Furthermore we establish a simple sufficient condition on a subspace $U$ that ensures any positive semidefinite matrix $L$ with column space $U$ can be recovered from $D+L$ for any diagonal matrix $D$ using a convex optimization-based heuristic known as minimum trace factor analysis. This result leads to a new understanding of the structure of rank-deficient correlation matrices and a simple condition on a set of points that ensures there is a centered ellipsoid passing through them.