• The degree splitting problem requires coloring the edges of a graph red or blue such that each node has almost the same number of edges in each color, up to a small additive discrepancy. The directed variant of the problem requires orienting the edges such that each node has almost the same number of incoming and outgoing edges, again up to a small additive discrepancy. We present deterministic distributed algorithms for both variants, which improve on their counterparts presented by Ghaffari and Su [SODA'17]: our algorithms are significantly simpler and faster, and have a much smaller discrepancy. This also leads to a faster and simpler deterministic algorithm for $(2+o(1))\Delta$-edge-coloring, improving on that of Ghaffari and Su.
  • Consider a small group of mobile agents whose goal is to locate a certain cell in a two-dimensional infinite grid. The agents operate in an asynchronous environment, where in each discrete time step, an arbitrary subset of the agents execute one atomic look-compute-move cycle. The protocol controlling each agent is determined by a (possibly distinct) finite automaton. The only means of communication is to sense the states of the agents sharing the same grid cell. Whenever an agent moves, the destination cell of the movement is chosen by the agent's automaton from the set of neighboring grid cells. We study the minimum number of agents required to locate the target cell within finite time and our main result states a tight lower bound for agents endowed with a global compass. Furthermore, we show that the lack of such a compass makes the problem strictly more difficult and present tight upper and lower bounds for this case.
  • The complexity of distributed edge coloring depends heavily on the palette size as a function of the maximum degree $\Delta$. In this paper we explore the complexity of edge coloring in the LOCAL model in different palette size regimes. 1. We simplify the \emph{round elimination} technique of Brandt et al. and prove that $(2\Delta-2)$-edge coloring requires $\Omega(\log_\Delta \log n)$ time w.h.p. and $\Omega(\log_\Delta n)$ time deterministically, even on trees. The simplified technique is based on two ideas: the notion of an irregular running time and some general observations that transform weak lower bounds into stronger ones. 2. We give a randomized edge coloring algorithm that can use palette sizes as small as $\Delta + \tilde{O}(\sqrt{\Delta})$, which is a natural barrier for randomized approaches. The running time of the algorithm is at most $O(\log\Delta \cdot T_{LLL})$, where $T_{LLL}$ is the complexity of a permissive version of the constructive Lovasz local lemma. 3. We develop a new distributed Lovasz local lemma algorithm for tree-structured dependency graphs, which leads to a $(1+\epsilon)\Delta$-edge coloring algorithm for trees running in $O(\log\log n)$ time. This algorithm arises from two new results: a deterministic $O(\log n)$-time LLL algorithm for tree-structured instances, and a randomized $O(\log\log n)$-time graph shattering method for breaking the dependency graph into independent $O(\log n)$-size LLL instances. 4. A natural approach to computing $(\Delta+1)$-edge colorings (Vizing's theorem) is to extend partial colorings by iteratively re-coloring parts of the graph. We prove that this approach may be viable, but in the worst case requires recoloring subgraphs of diameter $\Omega(\Delta\log n)$. This stands in contrast to distributed algorithms for Brooks' theorem, which exploit the existence of $O(\log_\Delta n)$-length augmenting paths.
  • Given two colorings of a graph, we consider the following problem: can we recolor the graph from one coloring to the other through a series of elementary changes, such that the graph is properly colored after each step? We introduce the notion of distributed recoloring: The input graph represents a network of computers that needs to be recolored. Initially, each node is aware of its own input color and target color. The nodes can exchange messages with each other, and eventually each node has to stop and output its own recoloring schedule, indicating when and how the node changes its color. The recoloring schedules have to be globally consistent so that the graph remains properly colored at each point, and we require that adjacent nodes do not change their colors simultaneously. We are interested in the following questions: How many communication rounds are needed (in the LOCAL model of distributed computing) to find a recoloring schedule? What is the length of the recoloring schedule? And how does the picture change if we can use extra colors to make recoloring easier? The main contributions of this work are related to distributed recoloring with one extra color in the following graph classes: trees, $3$-regular graphs, and toroidal grids.
  • Recently, studying fundamental graph problems in the \emph{Massive Parallel Computation (MPC)} framework, inspired by the \emph{MapReduce} paradigm, has gained a lot of attention. A standard assumption, common to most traditional approaches, is to allow $\widetilde{\Omega}(n)$ memory per machine, where $n$ is the number of nodes in the graph and $\widetilde{\Omega}$ hides polylogarithmic factors. However, as pointed out by Karloff et al.~[SODA'10] and Czumaj et al.~[arXiv:1707.03478], it might be unrealistic for a single machine to have linear or only slightly sublinear memory. In this paper, we propose the study of a more practical variant of the MPC model which only requires substantially sublinear or even subpolynomial memory per machine. In contrast to the standard MPC model and also streaming, in this low-memory MPC setting, a single machine will only see a small number of nodes in the graph. We introduce a new technique to cope with this imposed locality. In particular, we show that the \emph{Maximal Independent Set (MIS)} problem can be solved efficiently, that is, in $\bigO(\log^2 \log n)$ rounds, when the input graph is a tree. This substantially reduces the local memory from $\frac{n}{\poly\log n}$ required by the recent $\bigO(\log \log n)$-round MIS algorithm of Ghaffari et al., to $n^{\eps}$, without incurring a significant loss in the round complexity. Moreover, it demonstrates how to make use of the all-to-all communication in the MPC model to exponentially improve on the corresponding bound in the LOCAL and PRAM models by Lenzen and Wattenhofer [PODC'11].
  • Like distributed systems, biological multicellular processes are subject to dynamic changes and a biological system will not pass the survival-of-the-fittest test unless it exhibits certain features that enable fast recovery from these changes. In particular, a question that is crucial in the context of biological cellular networks, is whether the system can keep the changing components \emph{confined} so that only nodes in their vicinity may be affected by the changes, but nodes sufficiently far away from any changing component remain unaffected. Based on this notion of confinement, we propose a new metric for measuring the dynamic changes recovery performance in distributed network algorithms operating under the \emph{Stone Age} model (Emek \& Wattenhofer, PODC 2013), where the class of dynamic topology changes we consider includes inserting/deleting an edge, deleting a node together with its incident edges, and inserting a new isolated node. Our main technical contribution is a distributed algorithm for maximal independent set (MIS) in synchronous networks subject to these topology changes that performs well in terms of the aforementioned new metric. Specifically, our algorithm guarantees that nodes which do not experience a topology change in their immediate vicinity are not affected and that all surviving nodes (including the affected ones) perform $\mathcal{O}((C + 1) \log^{2} n)$ computationally-meaningful steps, where $C$ is the number of topology changes; in other words, each surviving node performs $\mathcal{O}(\log^{2} n)$ steps when amortized over the number of topology changes. This is accompanied by a simple example demonstrating that the linear dependency on $C$ cannot be avoided.
  • Consider a small number of scouts exploring the infinite $d$-dimensional grid with the aim of hitting a hidden target point. Each scout is controlled by a probabilistic finite automaton that determines its movement (to a neighboring grid point) based on its current state. The scouts, that operate under a fully synchronous schedule, communicate with each other (in a way that affects their respective states) when they share the same grid point and operate independently otherwise. Our main research question is: How many scouts are required to guarantee that the target admits a finite mean hitting time? Recently, it was shown that $d + 1$ is an upper bound on the answer to this question for any dimension $d \geq 1$ and the main contribution of this paper comes in the form of proving that this bound is tight for $d \in \{ 1, 2 \}$.
  • We show that any randomised Monte Carlo distributed algorithm for the Lov\'asz local lemma requires $\Omega(\log \log n)$ communication rounds, assuming that it finds a correct assignment with high probability. Our result holds even in the special case of $d = O(1)$, where $d$ is the maximum degree of the dependency graph. By prior work, there are distributed algorithms for the Lov\'asz local lemma with a running time of $O(\log n)$ rounds in bounded-degree graphs, and the best lower bound before our work was $\Omega(\log^* n)$ rounds [Chung et al. 2014].
  • Consider the Ants Nearby Treasure Search (ANTS) problem introduced by Feinerman, Korman, Lotker, and Sereni (PODC 2012), where $n$ mobile agents, initially placed at the origin of an infinite grid, collaboratively search for an adversarially hidden treasure. In this paper, the model of Feinerman et al. is adapted such that the agents are controlled by a (randomized) finite state machine: they possess a constant-size memory and are able to communicate with each other through constant-size messages. Despite the restriction to constant-size memory, we show that their collaborative performance remains the same by presenting a distributed algorithm that matches a lower bound established by Feinerman et al. on the run-time of any ANTS algorithm.
  • A local algorithm is a distributed algorithm that completes after a constant number of synchronous communication rounds. We present local approximation algorithms for the minimum dominating set problem and the maximum matching problem in 2-coloured and weakly 2-coloured graphs. In a weakly 2-coloured graph, both problems admit a local algorithm with the approximation factor $(\Delta+1)/2$, where $\Delta$ is the maximum degree of the graph. We also give a matching lower bound proving that there is no local algorithm with a better approximation factor for either of these problems. Furthermore, we show that the stronger assumption of a 2-colouring does not help in the case of the dominating set problem, but there is a local approximation scheme for the maximum matching problem in 2-coloured graphs.