• The Zwicky Transient Facility is a new robotic-observing program, in which a newly engineered 600-MP digital camera with a pioneeringly large field of view, 47~square degrees, will be installed into the 48-inch Samuel Oschin Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. The camera will generate $\sim 1$~petabyte of raw image data over three years of operations. In parallel related work, new hardware and software systems are being developed to process these data in real time and build a long-term archive for the processed products. The first public release of archived products is planned for early 2019, which will include processed images and astronomical-source catalogs of the northern sky in the $g$ and $r$ bands. Source catalogs based on two different methods will be generated for the archive: aperture photometry and point-spread-function fitting.
  • A systematic study on the long-term periodicities of known Galactic cataclysmic variables (CVs) was conducted. Among 1580 known CVs, 344 sources were matched and extracted from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) data repository. The PTF light curves were combined with the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS) light curves and analyzed. Ten targets were found to exhibit long-term periodic variability, which is not frequently observed in the CV systems. These long-term variations are possibly caused by various mechanisms, such as the precession of the accretion disk, hierarchical triple star system, magnetic field change of the companion star, and other possible mechanisms. We discuss the possible mechanisms in this study. If the long-term period is less than several tens of days, the disk precession period scenario is favored. However, the hierarchical triple star system or the variations in magnetic field strengths are most likely the predominant mechanisms for longer periods.
  • We apply The Tractor image modeling code to improve upon existing multi-band photometry for the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). SERVS consists of post-cryogenic Spitzer observations at 3.6 and 4.5 micron over five well-studied deep fields spanning 18 square degrees. In concert with data from ground-based near-infrared (NIR) and optical surveys, SERVS aims to provide a census of the properties of massive galaxies out to z ~ 5. To accomplish this, we are using The Tractor to perform "forced photometry." This technique employs prior measurements of source positions and surface brightness profiles from a high-resolution fiducial band from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey to model and fit the fluxes at lower-resolution bands. We discuss our implementation of The Tractor over a square degree test region within the XMM-LSS field with deep imaging in 12 NIR/optical bands. Our new multi-band source catalogs offer a number of advantages over traditional position-matched catalogs, including 1) consistent source cross-identification between bands, 2) de-blending of sources that are clearly resolved in the fiducial band but blended in the lower-resolution SERVS data, 3) a higher source detection fraction in each band, 4) a larger number of candidate galaxies in the redshift range 5 < z < 6, and 5) a statistically significant improvement in the photometric redshift accuracy as evidenced by the significant decrease in the fraction of outliers compared to spectroscopic redshifts. Thus, forced photometry using The Tractor offers a means of improving the accuracy of multi-band extragalactic surveys designed for galaxy evolution studies. We will extend our application of this technique to the full SERVS footprint in the future.
  • Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects in the literature to 22. We also report new data, including a near-infrared spectrum, on the Type Ibn SN 2015U. In order to characterize the class as a whole, we analyze the photometric and spectroscopic properties of the full Type Ibn sample. We find that, despite the expectation that CSM interaction would generate a heterogeneous set of light curves, as seen in SNe IIn, most Type Ibn light curves are quite similar in shape, declining at rates around 0.1 mag/day during the first month after maximum light, with a few significant exceptions. Early spectra of SNe Ibn come in at least two varieties, one that shows narrow P Cygni lines and another dominated by broader emission lines, both around maximum light, which may be an indication of differences in the state of the progenitor system at the time of explosion. Alternatively, the spectral diversity could arise from viewing-angle effects or merely from a lack of early spectroscopic coverage. Together, the relative light curve homogeneity and narrow spectral features suggest that the CSM consists of a spatially confined shell of helium surrounded by a less dense extended wind.
  • We present an ongoing, systematic search for extragalactic infrared transients, dubbed SPIRITS --- SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey. In the first year, using Spitzer/IRAC, we searched 190 nearby galaxies with cadence baselines of one month and six months. We discovered over 1958 variables and 43 transients. Here, we describe the survey design and highlight 14 unusual infrared transients with no optical counterparts to deep limits, which we refer to as SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate Luminosity Transient Events). SPRITEs are in the infrared luminosity gap between novae and supernovae, with [4.5] absolute magnitudes between -11 and -14 (Vega-mag) and [3.6]-[4.5] colors between 0.3 mag and 1.6 mag. The photometric evolution of SPRITEs is diverse, ranging from < 0.1 mag/yr to > 7 mag/yr. SPRITEs occur in star-forming galaxies. We present an in-depth study of one of them, SPIRITS 14ajc in Messier 83, which shows shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. This shock may have been triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars that led to either the formation of a binary or a proto-stellar merger.
  • The wide-field synoptic sky surveys, known as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), will accumulate a large number of known and new RR Lyrae. These RR Lyrae are good tracers to study the substructure of the Galactic halo if their distance, metallicity, and galactocentric velocity can be measured. Candidates of halo RR Lyrae can be identified from their distance and metallicity before requesting spectroscopic observations for confirmation. This is because both quantities can be obtained via their photometric light curves, because the absolute V-band magnitude for RR Lyrae is correlated with metallicity, and the metallicity can be estimated using a metallicity-light curve relation. To fully utilize the PTF and iPTF light-curve data in related future work, it is necessary to derive the metallicity-light curve relation in the native PTF/iPTF R-band photometric system. In this work, we derived such a relation using the known ab-type RR Lyrae located in the Kepler field, and it is found to be $[Fe/H]_{PTF} = -4.089 - 7.346 P + 1.280 \phi_{31}$ (where $P$ is pulsational period and $\phi_{31}$ is one of the Fourier parameters describing the shape of the light curve), with a dispersion of 0.118 dex. We tested our metallicity-light curve relation with new spectroscopic observations of a few RR Lyrae in the Kepler field, as well as several data sets available in the literature. Our tests demonstrated that the derived metallicity-light curve relation could be used to estimate metallicities for the majority of the RR Lyrae, which are in agreement with the published values.
  • We describe the near real-time transient-source discovery engine for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), currently in operations at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), Caltech. We coin this system the IPAC/iPTF Discovery Engine (or IDE). We review the algorithms used for PSF-matching, image subtraction, detection, photometry, and machine-learned (ML) vetting of extracted transient candidates. We also review the performance of our ML classifier. For a limiting signal-to-noise ratio of 4 in relatively unconfused regions, "bogus" candidates from processing artifacts and imperfect image subtractions outnumber real transients by ~ 10:1. This can be considerably higher for image data with inaccurate astrometric and/or PSF-matching solutions. Despite this occasionally high contamination rate, the ML classifier is able to identify real transients with an efficiency (or completeness) of ~ 97% for a maximum tolerable false-positive rate of 1% when classifying raw candidates. All subtraction-image metrics, source features, ML probability-based real-bogus scores, contextual metadata from other surveys, and possible associations with known Solar System objects are stored in a relational database for retrieval by the various science working groups. We review our efforts in mitigating false-positives and our experience in optimizing the overall system in response to the multitude of science projects underway with iPTF.
  • Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) in the 1-100 meter size range are estimated to be $\sim$1,000 times more numerous than the $\sim$15,000 currently-catalogued NEAs, most of which are in the 0.5-10 kilometer size range. Impacts from 10-100 meter size NEAs are not statistically life-threatening but may cause significant regional damage, while 1-10 meter size NEAs with low velocities relative to Earth are compelling targets for space missions. We describe the implementation and initial results of a real-time NEA-discovery system specialized for the detection of small, high angular rate (visually-streaked) NEAs in Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) images. PTF is a 1.2-m aperture, 7.3-deg$^2$ field-of-view optical survey designed primarily for the discovery of extragalactic transients (e.g., supernovae) in 60-second exposures reaching $\sim$20.5 visual magnitude. Our real-time NEA discovery pipeline uses a machine-learned classifier to filter a large number of false-positive streak detections, permitting a human scanner to efficiently and remotely identify real asteroid streaks during the night. Upon recognition of a streaked NEA detection (typically within an hour of the discovery exposure), the scanner triggers follow-up with the same telescope and posts the observations to the Minor Planet Center for worldwide confirmation. We describe our ten initial confirmed discoveries, all small NEAs that passed 0.3-15 lunar distances from Earth. Lastly, we derive useful scaling laws for comparing streaked-NEA-detection capabilities of different surveys as a function of their hardware and survey-pattern characteristics. This work most directly informs estimates of the streak-detection capabilities of the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF, planned to succeed PTF in 2017), which will apply PTF's current resolution and sensitivity over a 47-deg$^2$ field-of-view.
  • In order to look for large super-fast rotators, five dedicated surveys covering ~ 188 square degree in the ecliptic plane have been carried out in R-band with ~10 min cadence using the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in late 2014 and early 2015. Among 1029 reliable rotation periods obtained from the surveys, we discovered one new large super-fast rotator, (40511) 1999 RE88, and other 18 candidates. (40511) 1999 RE88 is an S-type inner main-belt asteroid with a diameter of D = 1.9 +- 0.3 km, which has a rotation period of P = 1.96 +- 0.01 hr and a lightcurve amplitude of ~0.1 mag. To maintain such fast rotation, an internal cohesive strength of ~780 Pa is required. Combining all known large super-fast rotators, their cohesive strengths all fall in the range of 100 to 1000 Pa of lunar regolith. However, the number of large super-fast rotators seems to be far less than the whole asteroid population. This might indicate a peculiar asteroid group for them. Although the detection efficiency for a long rotation period is greatly reduced due to our two-day observation time span, the spin-rate distributions of this work show consistent results with Chang et al. (2015) after considering the possible observational bias in our surveys. It shows a number decrease with increase of spin rate for asteroids with diameter of 3 < D < 15 km, and a number drop at spin-rate of f = 5 rev/day for asteroids with D < 3 km.
  • We examine the repeatability, reliability, and accuracy of differential exoplanet eclipse depth measurements made using the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope during the post-cryogenic mission. We have re-analyzed an existing 4.5 {\mu}m data set, consisting of 10 observations of the XO-3b system during secondary eclipse, using seven different techniques for removing correlated noise. We find that, on average, for a given technique, the eclipse depth estimate is repeatable from epoch to epoch to within 156 parts per million (ppm). Most techniques derive eclipse depths that do not vary by more than a factor 3 of the photon noise limit. All methods but one accurately assess their own errors: for these methods, the individual measurement uncertainties are comparable to the scatter in eclipse depths over the 10 epoch sample. To assess the accuracy of the techniques as well as to clarify the difference between instrumental and other sources of measurement error, we have also analyzed a simulated data set of 10 visits to XO-3b, for which the eclipse depth is known. We find that three of the methods (BLISS mapping, Pixel Level Decorrelation, and Independent Component Analysis) obtain results that are within three times the photon limit of the true eclipse depth. When averaged over the 10 epoch ensemble, 5 out of 7 techniques come within 60 ppm of the true value. Spitzer exoplanet data, if obtained following current best practices and reduced using methods such as those described here, can measure repeatable and accurate single eclipse depths, with close to photon-limited results.
  • We report the discovery of 2 new Be stars, and re-identify one known Be star in the open cluster NGC 6830. Eleven H-alpha emitters were discovered using the H-alpha imaging photometry of the Palomar Transient Factory Survey. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified with photometric and kinematic information using 2MASS data and proper motions. The spectroscopic confirmation was carried out by using the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick observatory. Based on their spectral types, three H-alpha emitters were confirmed as Be stars with H-alpha equivalent widths > -10 Angstrom. Two objects were also observed by the new spectrograph SED-Machine on the Palomar 60 inch Telescope. The SED-Machine results show strong H-alpha emission lines, which are consistent with the results of the Lick observations. The high efficiency of the SED-Machine can provide rapid observations for Be stars in a comprehensive survey in the future.
  • We present the results of a MIPS-24um study of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) of 535 high-redshift galaxy clusters. The clusters are drawn from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS), which effectively provides a sample selected on total stellar mass, over 0.2 < z < 1.8 within the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey fields. 20%, or 106 clusters have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts, and the rest have redshifts estimated from the color of their red sequence. A comparison with the public SWIRE images detects 125 individual BCGs at 24um > 100uJy, or 23%. The luminosity-limited detection rate of BCGs in similar richness clusters (Ngal> 12) increases rapidly with redshift. Above z ~ 1, an average of ~20\% of the sample have 24um-inferred infrared luminosities of LIR > 10^12 Lsun, while the fraction below z ~ 1 exhibiting such luminosities is < 1 \%. The Spitzer-IRAC colors indicate the bulk of the 24um-detected population is predominantly powered by star formation, with only 7/125 galaxies lying within the color region inhabited by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Simple arguments limit the star-formation activity to several hundred million years and this may therefore be indicative of the timescale for AGN feedback to halt the star formation. Below redshift z ~ 1 there is not enough star formation to significantly contribute to the overall stellar mass of the BCG population, and therefore BCG growth is likely dominated by dry-mergers. Above z~ 1, however, the inferred star formation would double the stellar mass of the BCGs and is comparable to the mass assembly predicted by simulations through dry mergers. We cannot yet constrain the process driving the star formation for the overall sample, though a single object studied in detail is consistent with a gas-rich merger.
  • We have discovered an optically rich galaxy cluster at z=1.7089 with star formation occurring in close proximity to the central galaxy. The system, SpARCS104922.6+564032.5, was detected within the Spitzer Adaptation of the red-sequence Cluster Survey, (SpARCS), and confirmed through Keck-MOSFIRE spectroscopy. The rest-frame optical richness of Ngal(500kpc) = 30+/-8 implies a total halo mass, within 500kpc, of ~3.8+/-1.2 x 10^14 Msun, comparable to other clusters at or above this redshift. There is a wealth of ancillary data available, including Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope optical, UKIRT-K, Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS, and Herschel-SPIRE. This work adds submillimeter imaging with the SCUBA2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The mid/far-infrared (M/FIR) data detect an Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxy spatially coincident with the central galaxy, with LIR = 6.2+/-0.9 x 10^12 Lsun. The detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at z=1.7 in a Spitzer-IRS spectrum of the source implies the FIR luminosity is dominated by star formation (an Active Galactic Nucleus contribution of 20%) with a rate of ~860+/-30 Msun/yr. The optical source corresponding to the IR emission is likely a chain of of > 10 individual clumps arranged as "beads on a string" over a linear scale of 66 kpc. Its morphology and proximity to the Brightest Cluster Galaxy imply a gas-rich interaction at the center of the cluster triggered the star formation. This system indicates that wet mergers may be an important process in forming the stellar mass of BCGs at early times.
  • The progenitor stars of several Type IIb supernovae (SNe) show indications for extended hydrogen envelopes. These envelopes might be the outcome of luminous energetic pre-explosion events, so-called precursor eruptions. We use the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) pre-explosion observations of a sample of 27 nearby Type IIb SNe to look for such precursors during the final years prior to the SN explosion. No precursors are found when combining the observations in 15-day bins, and we calculate the absolute-magnitude-dependent upper limit on the precursor rate. At the 90% confidence level, Type IIb SNe have on average $<0.86$ precursors as bright as absolute $R$-band magnitude $-14$ in the final 3.5 years before the explosion and $<0.56$ events over the final year. In contrast, precursors among SNe IIn have a $\gtrsim 5$ times higher rate. The kinetic energy required to unbind a low-mass stellar envelope is comparable to the radiated energy of a few-weeks-long precursor which would be detectable for the closest SNe in our sample. Therefore, mass ejections, if they are common in such SNe, are radiatively inefficient or have durations longer than months. Indeed, when using 60-day bins a faint precursor candidate is detected prior to SN 2012cs ($\sim2$% false-alarm probability). We also report the detection of the progenitor of SN 2011dh which does not show detectable variability over the final two years before the explosion. The suggested progenitor of SN 2012P is still present, and hence is likely a compact star cluster, or an unrelated object.
  • Two dedicated asteroid rotation-period surveys have been carried out using data taken on January 6-9 and February 20-23 of 2014 by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) in the $R$~band with $\sim 20$-min cadence. The total survey area covered 174~deg$^2$ in the ecliptic plane. Reliable rotation periods for 1,438 asteroids are obtained from a larger data set of 6,551 mostly main-belt asteroids, each with $\geq 10$~detections. Analysis of 1751, PTF based, reliable rotation periods clearly shows the "spin barrier" at $\sim 2$~hours for "rubble-pile" asteroids. We also found a new large-sized super-fast rotator, 2005 UW163 (Chang et al., 2014), and other five candidates as well. Our spin-rate distributions of asteroids with $3 < D < 15$~km shows number decrease when frequency greater than 5 rev/day, which is consistent to that of the Asteroid Light Curve Database (LCDB, Warner et al., 2009) and the result of (Masiero et al., 2009). We found the discrepancy in the spin-rate distribution between our result and (Pravec et al., 2008, update 2014-04-20) is mainly from asteroids with $\Delta m < 0.2$ mag that might be primarily due to different survey strategies. For asteroids with $D \leq 3$~km, we found a significant number drop at $f = 6$ rev/day. The YORP effect timescale for small-sized asteroid is shorter that makes more elongate objets spun up to reach their spin-rate limit and results in break-up. The K-S test suggests a possible difference in the spin-rate distributions of C- and S-type asteroids. We also find that C-type asteroids have a smaller spin-rate limit than the S-type, which agrees with the general sense that the C-type has lower bulk density than the S-type.
  • Type Ia supernovae are destructive explosions of carbon oxygen white dwarfs. Although they are used empirically to measure cosmological distances, the nature of their progenitors remains mysterious, One of the leading progenitor models, called the single degenerate channel, hypothesizes that a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star and the resulting increase in its central pressure and temperature ignites thermonuclear explosion. Here we report observations of strong but declining ultraviolet emission from a Type Ia supernova within four days of its explosion. This emission is consistent with theoretical expectations of collision between material ejected by the supernova and a companion star, and therefore provides evidence that some Type Ia supernovae arise from the single degenerate channel.
  • We fit 54,296 sparsely-sampled asteroid lightcurves in the Palomar Transient Factory to a combined rotation plus phase-function model. Each lightcurve consists of 20+ observations acquired in a single opposition. Using 805 asteroids in our sample that have reference periods in the literature, we find the reliability of our fitted periods is a complicated function of the period, amplitude, apparent magnitude and other attributes. Using the 805-asteroid ground-truth sample, we train an automated classifier to estimate (along with manual inspection) the validity of the remaining 53,000 fitted periods. By this method we find 9,033 of our lightcurves (of 8,300 unique asteroids) have reliable periods. Subsequent consideration of asteroids with multiple lightcurve fits indicate 4% contamination in these reliable periods. For 3,902 lightcurves with sufficient phase-angle coverage and either a reliably-fit period or low amplitude, we examine the distribution of several phase-function parameters, none of which are bimodal though all correlate with the bond albedo and with visible-band colors. Comparing the theoretical maximal spin rate of a fluid body with our amplitude versus spin-rate distribution suggests that, if held together only by self-gravity, most asteroids are in general less dense than 2 g/cm$^3$, while C types have a lower limit of between 1 and 2 g/cm$^3$, in agreement with previous density estimates. For 5-20km diameters, S types rotate faster and have lower amplitudes than C types. If both populations share the same angular momentum, this may indicate the two types' differing ability to deform under rotational stress. Lastly, we compare our absolute magnitudes and apparent-magnitude residuals to those of the Minor Planet Center's nominal $G=0.15$, rotation-neglecting model; our phase-function plus Fourier-series fitting reduces asteroid photometric RMS scatter by a factor of 3.
  • We present Be star candidates in the open cluster NGC\,663, identified by H$\alpha$ imaging photometry with the Palomar Transient Factory Survey, as a pilot program to investigate how the Be star phenomena, the emission spectra, extended circumstellar envelopes, and fast rotation, correlate with massive stellar evolution. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified by 2MASS magnitudes and colors, and by proper motions. We discover 4 new Be stars and exclude one known Be star from being a member due to its inconsistent proper motions. The fraction of Be stars to member stars [N(Be)/N(members)] in NGC\,663 is 3.5\%. The spectral type of the 34 Be stars in NGC\,663 shows bimodal peaks at B0--B2 and B5--B7, which is consistent with the statistics in most star clusters. Additionally, we also discover 23 emission-line stars of different types, including non-member Be stars, dwarfs, and giants.
  • The AM CVn systems are a class of He-rich, post-period minimum, semi-detached, ultra-compact binaries. Their long-term light curves have been poorly understood due to the few systems known and the long (hundreds of days) recurrence times between outbursts. We present combined photometric light curves from the LINEAR, CRTS, and PTF synoptic surveys to study the photometric variability of these systems over an almost 10 yr period. These light curves provide a much clearer picture of the outburst phenomena that these systems undergo. We characterize the photometric behavior of most known outbursting AM CVn systems and establish a relation between their outburst properties and the systems' orbital periods. We also explore why some systems have only shown a single outburst so far and expand the previously accepted phenomenological states of AM CVn systems. We conclude that the outbursts of these systems show evolution with respect to the orbital period, which can likely be attributed to the decreasing mass transfer rate with increasing period. Finally, we consider the number of AM CVn systems that should be present in modeled synoptic surveys.
  • We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory: iPTF13ajg. At a redshift of z=0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude M(u,AB)=-22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The uBgRiz light curves, obtained with the P48, P60, NOT, DCT, and Keck telescopes, and the nine-epoch spectral sequence secured with the Keck and the VLT (covering 3 rest-frame months), are tied together photometrically to provide an estimate of the flux evolution as a function of time and wavelength. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF13ajg is 3.2x10^44 erg/s, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3x10^51 erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the VLT. From Voigt-profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I)=11.94+-0.06, log N(Mg II)=14.7+-0.3, and log N(Fe II)=14.25+-0.10. These column densities, as well as the Mg I and Mg II equivalent widths of a sample of hydrogen-poor SLSNe taken from the literature, are at the low end of those derived for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), whose progenitors are also thought to be massive stars. This suggests that the environments of SLSNe and GRBs are different. From the nondetection of Fe II fine-structure absorption lines, we derive a strict lower limit on the distance between the supernova and the narrow-line absorbing gas of 50 pc. No host-galaxy emission lines are detected, leading to an upper limit on the unobscured star-formation rate of SFR([OII])<0.07 Msun/yr. Late-time imaging shows the host galaxy of iPTF13ajg to be faint, with g(AB)~27.0 and R(AB)>=26.0 mag, which roughly corresponds to M(B,Vega) >~ -17.7 mag. [abridged]
  • Asteroids of size larger than 150 m generally do not have rotation periods smaller than 2.2 hours. This spin cutoff is believed to be due to the gravitationally bound rubble-pile structures of the asteroids. Rotation with periods exceeding this critical value will cause asteroid breakup. Up until now, only one object, 2001 OE84, has been found to be an exception to this spin cutoff. We report the discovery of a new super-fast rotator, (335433) 2005 UW163, spinning with a period of 1.290 hours and a lightcurve variation of $r'\sim0.8$ mag from the observations made at the P48 telescope and the P200 telescope of the Palomar Observatory. Its $H_{r'} = 17.69 \pm 0.27$ mag and multi-band colors (i.e., $g'-r' = 0.68\pm0.03$ mag, $r'-i' = 0.19\pm0.02$ mag and SDSS $i-z = -0.45$ mag) show it is a V-type asteroid with a diameter of $0.6 +0.3/-0.2$ km. This indicates (335433) 2005 UW163 is a super-fast rotator beyond the regime of the small monolithic asteroid.
  • Since the discovery of the unusual prototype SN 2002cx, the eponymous class of low-velocity, hydrogen-poor supernovae has grown to include at most another two dozen members identified from several heterogeneous surveys, in some cases ambiguously. Here we present the results of a systematic study of 1077 hydrogen-poor supernovae discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory, leading to nine new members of this peculiar class. Moreover we find there are two distinct subclasses based on their spectroscopic, photometric, and host galaxy properties: The "SN 2002cx-like" supernovae tend to be in later-type or more irregular hosts, have more varied and generally dimmer luminosities, have longer rise times, and lack a Ti II trough when compared to the "SN 2002es-like" supernovae. None of our objects show helium, and we counter a previous claim of two such events. We also find that these transients comprise 5.6+17-3.7% (90% confidence) of all SNe Ia, lower compared to earlier estimates. Combining our objects with the literature sample, we propose that these subclasses have two distinct physical origins.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is a multi-epochal robotic survey of the northern sky that acquires data for the scientific study of transient and variable astrophysical phenomena. The camera and telescope provide for wide-field imaging in optical bands. In the five years of operation since first light on December 13, 2008, images taken with Mould-R and SDSS-g' camera filters have been routinely acquired on a nightly basis (weather permitting), and two different H-alpha filters were installed in May 2011 (656 nm and 663 nm). The PTF image-processing and data-archival program at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) is tailored to receive and reduce the data, and, from it, generate and preserve astrometrically and photometrically calibrated images, extracted source catalogs, and coadded reference images. Relational databases have been deployed to track these products in operations and the data archive. The fully automated system has benefited by lessons learned from past IPAC projects and comprises advantageous features that are potentially incorporable into other ground-based observatories. Both off-the-shelf and in-house software have been utilized for economy and rapid development. The PTF data archive is curated by the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). A state-of-the-art custom web interface has been deployed for downloading the raw images, processed images, and source catalogs from IRSA. Access to PTF data products is currently limited to an initial public data release (M81, M44, M42, SDSS Stripe 82, and the Kepler Survey Field). It is the intent of the PTF collaboration to release the full PTF data archive when sufficient funding becomes available.
  • A new asteroid rotation period survey have been carried out by using the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Twelve consecutive PTF fields, which covered an area of 87 deg$^2$ in the ecliptic plane, were observed in $R$ band with a cadence of $\sim$20 min during February 15--18, 2013. We detected 2500 known asteroids with a diameter range of 0.5 km $\leq D \leq$ 200 km. Of these, 313 objects had highly reliable rotation periods and exhibited the "spin barrier" at $\sim2$ hours. In contrast to the flat spin rate distribution of the asteroids with 3 km $\leq D \leq$ 15 km shown by Pravec et al. (2008), our results deviated somewhat from a Maxwellian distribution and showed a decrease at the spin rate greater than 5 rev/day. One super-fast-rotator candidate and two possible binary asteroids were also found in this work.
  • The iPTF detection of the most recent outburst of the recurrent nova system RX J0045.4+4154 in the Andromeda Galaxy has enabled the unprecedented study of a massive ($M>1.3\ M_\odot$) accreting white dwarf (WD). We detected this nova as part of the near daily iPTF monitoring of M31 to a depth of $R\approx 21$\,mag and triggered optical photometry, spectroscopy and soft X-ray monitoring of the outburst. Peaking at an absolute magnitude of $M_R=-6.6$ mag, and with a decay time of 1 mag per day, it is a faint and very fast nova. It shows optical emission lines of He/N and expansion velocities of 1900 to 2600 km s$^{-1}$ 1--4 days after the optical peak. The {\it Swift} monitoring of the X-ray evolution revealed a supersoft source (SSS) with $kT_{\rm eff}\approx 90-110\ {\rm eV}$ that appeared within 5 days after the optical peak, and lasted only 12 days. Most remarkably, this is not the first event from this system, rather it is a recurrent nova with a time between outbursts of approximately 1 year, the shortest known. Recurrent X-ray emission from this binary was detected by ROSAT in 1992 and 1993, and the source was well characterized as a $M>1.3\ M_\odot$ WD SSS. Based on the observed recurrence time between different outbursts, the duration and effective temperature of the SS phase, MESA models of accreting WDs allow us to constrain the accretion rate to $\dot M>1.7\times10^{-7}\ {M_{\odot}\ {\rm yr}}^{-1}$ and WD mass $>1.30\ M_{\odot}$. If the WD keeps $30\%$ of the accreted material, it will take less than a Myr to reach core densities high enough for carbon ignition (if made of C/O) or electron capture (if made of O/Ne) to end the binary evolution.