• We investigate six supernova remnant (SNR) candidates --- G51.21+0.11, G52.37-0.70, G53.07+0.49, G53.41+0.03, G53.84-0.75, and the possible shell around G54.1-0.3 --- in the Galactic Plane using newly acquired LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) High-Band Antenna (HBA) observations, as well as archival Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Very Large Array Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) mosaics. We find that G52.37-0.70, G53.84-0.75, and the possible shell around pulsar wind nebula G54.1+0.3 are unlikely to be SNRs, while G53.07+0.49 remains a candidate SNR. G51.21+0.11 has a spectral index of $\alpha=-0.7\pm0.21$, but lacks X-ray observations and as such requires further investigation to confirm its nature. We confirm one candidate, G53.41+0.03, as a new SNR because it has a shell-like morphology, a radio spectral index of $\alpha=-0.6\pm0.2$ and it has the X-ray spectral characteristics of a 1000-8000 year old SNR. The X-ray analysis was performed using archival XMM-Newton observations, which show that G53.41+0.03 has strong emission lines and is best characterized by a non-equilibrium ionization model, consistent with an SNR interpretation. Deep Arecibo radio telescope searches for a pulsar associated with G53.41+0.03 resulted in no detection, but place stringent upper limits on the flux density of such a source if it is beamed towards Earth.
  • We present coordinated Chandra X-ray Observatory and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the transitional millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 in its low-luminosity accreting state. The unprecedented five hours of strictly simultaneous X-ray and radio continuum coverage for the first time unambiguously show a highly reproducible, anti-correlated variability pattern. The characteristic switches from the X-ray high mode into a low mode are always accompanied by a radio brightening with duration that closely matches the X-ray low mode interval. This behavior cannot be explained by a canonical inflow/outflow accretion model where the radiated emission and the jet luminosity are powered by, and positively correlated with, the available accretion energy. We interpret this phenomenology as alternating episodes of low-level accretion onto the neutron star during the X-ray high mode that are interrupted by rapid ejections of plasma by the active rotation-powered pulsar, possibly initiated by a reconfiguration of the pulsar magnetosphere, that cause a transition to a less luminous X-ray mode. The observed anti-correlation between radio and X-ray luminosity has an additional consequence: transitional MSPs can make excursions into a region of the radio/X-ray luminosity plane previously thought to be occupied solely by black hole X-ray binary sources. This complicates the use of this luminosity relation to identify candidate black holes, suggesting the need for additional discriminants when attempting to establish the true nature of the accretor.
  • We measure the effects of interstellar scattering on average pulse profiles from 13 radio pulsars with simple pulse shapes. We use data from the LOFAR High Band Antennas, at frequencies between 110 and 190~MHz. We apply a forward fitting technique, and simultaneously determine the intrinsic pulse shape, assuming single Gaussian component profiles. We find that the constant $\tau$, associated with scattering by a single thin screen, has a power-law dependence on frequency $\tau \propto \nu^{-\alpha}$, with indices ranging from $\alpha = 1.50$ to $4.0$, despite simplest theoretical models predicting $\alpha = 4.0$ or $4.4$. Modelling the screen as an isotropic or extremely anisotropic scatterer, we find anisotropic scattering fits lead to larger power-law indices, often in better agreement with theoretically expected values. We compare the scattering models based on the inferred, frequency dependent parameters of the intrinsic pulse, and the resulting correction to the dispersion measure (DM). We highlight the cases in which fits of extreme anisotropic scattering are appealing, while stressing that the data do not strictly favour either model for any of the 13 pulsars. The pulsars show anomalous scattering properties that are consistent with finite scattering screens and/or anisotropy, but these data alone do not provide the means for an unambiguous characterization of the screens. We revisit the empirical $\tau$ versus DM relation and consider how our results support a frequency dependence of $\alpha$. Very long baseline interferometry, and observations of the scattering and scintillation properties of these sources at higher frequencies, will provide further evidence.
  • We analyzed broad-band X-ray and radio data of the magnetar SGR J1935+2154 taken in the aftermath of its 2014, 2015, and 2016 outbursts. The source soft X-ray spectrum <10 keV is well described with a BB+PL or 2BB model during all three outbursts. NuSTAR observations revealed a hard X-ray tail, $\Gamma=0.9$, extending up to 79 keV, with flux larger than the one detected <10 keV. Imaging analysis of Chandra data did not reveal small-scale extended emission around the source. Following the outbursts, the total 0.5-10 keV flux from SGR J1935+2154 increased in concordance to its bursting activity, with the flux at activation onset increasing by a factor of $\sim7$ following its strongest June 2016 outburst. A Swift/XRT observation taken 1.5 days prior to the onset of this outburst showed a flux level consistent with quiescence. We show that the flux increase is due to the PL or hot BB component, which increased by a factor of $25$ compared to quiescence, while the cold BB component $kT=0.47$ keV remained more or less constant. The 2014 and 2015 outbursts decayed quasi-exponentially with time-scales of $\sim40$ days, while the stronger May and June 2016 outbursts showed a quick short-term decay with time-scales of $\sim4$ days. Our Arecibo radio observations set the deepest limits on the radio emission from a magnetar, with a maximum flux density limit of 14 $\mu$Jy for the 4.6 GHz observations and 7 $\mu$Jy for the 1.4 GHz observations. We discuss these results in the framework of the current magnetar theoretical models.
  • We have monitored the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 in quiescence after its ~4.5 month outburst in 2015. The source has been observed using Swift and XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectra were dominated by a thermal component. The thermal evolution showed a gradual X-ray luminosity decay from ~18 x 10^32 to ~4 x 10^32 (D/5.8 kpc)^2 erg s^{-1} between ~8 and ~379 d in quiescence, and the inferred neutron star surface temperature (for an observer at infinity; using a neutron star atmosphere model) decreased from ~100 to ~71 eV. This can be interpreted as cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust. Modelling the observed temperature curve (using NSCOOL) indicated that the source required ~1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon of shallow heating in addition to the standard deep crustal heating to explain its thermal evolution. Alternatively, the decay could also be modelled without the presence of deep crustal heating, only having a shallow heat source (again ~1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon was required). However, the XMM-Newton data statistically required an additional power-law component. This component contributed ~30 per cent of the total unabsorbed flux in 0.5-10 keV energy range. The physical origin of this component is unknown. One possibility is that it arises from low-level accretion. The presence of this component in the spectrum complicates our cooling crust interpretation because it might indicate that the smooth luminosity and temperature decay curves we observed may not be due to crust cooling but due to some other process.
  • Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star's spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star's magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star's surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neutron star. We have phase-connected nine XMM-Newton observations of PSR J1023+0038 over the last 2.5 years of the LMXB state to establish a precise measurement of spin evolution. We find that the average spin-down rate as an LMXB is 26.8+/-0.4% faster than the rate (-2.39x10^-15 Hz s-1) determined during the RMSP state. This shows that negative angular momentum contributions (dipolar magnetic braking and outflow) exceed positive ones (accreted material), and suggests that the pulsar wind continues to operate at a largely unmodified level. We discuss implications of this tight observational constraint in the context of possible accretion models.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • Accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars are an important subset of low-mass X-ray binaries in which coherent X-ray pulsations can be observed during occasional, bright outbursts (X-ray luminosity $L_X\sim 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$). These pulsations show that matter is being channeled onto the neutron star's magnetic poles. However, such sources spend most of their time in a low-luminosity, quiescent state ($L_X\lesssim 10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$), where the nature of the accretion flow onto the neutron star (if any) is not well understood. Here we report that the millisecond pulsar/low-mass X-ray binary transition object PSR J1023+0038 intermittently shows coherent X-ray pulsations at luminosities nearly 100 times fainter than observed in any other accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar. We conclude that in spite of its low luminosity PSR J1023+0038 experiences episodes of channeled accretion, a discovery that challenges existing models for accretion onto magnetized neutron stars.
  • The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary. We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent low-mass X-ray binary state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ~70% of the time in a $\approx$$3\times10^{33}$ erg/s X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al. (2014), exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with $\approx$$5\times 10^{32}$ erg/s and sporadic flares reaching up to $\approx$$10^{34}$ erg/s, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the three X-ray modes, presumably due to complete quenching of the radio emission mechanism by the accretion flow. Radio imaging detects highly variable, flat-spectrum continuum emission from PSR J1023+0038, consistent with an origin in a weak jet-like outflow. Our concurrent X-ray and radio continuum data sets do not exhibit any correlated behavior. The observational evidence we present bears qualitative resemblance to the behavior predicted by some existing propeller and trapped disk accretion models although none can fully account for all aspects of the rich phenomenology of this system.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will use pulsars to enable precise measurements of strong gravity effects in pulsar systems, which yield tests of gravitational theories that cannot be carried out anywhere else. The Galactic census of pulsars will discover dozens of relativistic pulsar systems, possibly including pulsar -- black hole binaries which can be used to test the "cosmic censorship conjecture" and the "no-hair theorem". Also, the SKA's remarkable sensitivity will vastly improve the timing precision of millisecond pulsars, allowing probes of potential deviations from general relativity (GR). Aspects of gravitation to be explored include tests of strong equivalence principles, gravitational dipole radiation, extra field components of gravitation, gravitomagnetism, and spacetime symmetries.
  • XSS J12270-4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9-4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disc disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227-4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm$^{-3}$ associated with this source, using the GMRT at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824-2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227-4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17 to 0.46 M$_{sun}$ suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227-4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz; with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ~ 10$^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption, rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.
  • We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~1.4 x 10^4 sq. deg, with 1-hr dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 sq. deg using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 sq. deg, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 sq. deg per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of < 150 /day/sky, for bursts brighter than S > 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the first with LOFAR or any digital aperture array. LOTAS also re-detected 27 previously known pulsars. These pilot studies show that LOFAR can efficiently carry out all-sky surveys for pulsars and fast transients, and they set the stage for further surveying efforts using LOFAR and the planned low-frequency component of the Square Kilometer Array.
  • High-precision timing of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) over years to decades is a promising technique for direct detection of gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Time-variable, multi-path scattering in the interstellar medium is a significant source of noise for this detector, particularly as timing precision approaches 10 ns or better for MSPs in the pulsar timing array. For many MSPs the scattering delay above 1 GHz is at the limit of detectability; therefore, we study it at lower frequencies. Using the LOFAR (LOw-Frequency ARray) radio telescope we have analyzed short (5-20 min) observations of three MSPs in order to estimate the scattering delay at 110-190 MHz, where the number of scintles is large and, hence, the statistical uncertainty in the scattering delay is small. We used cyclic spectroscopy, still relatively novel in radio astronomy, on baseband-sampled data to achieve unprecedented frequency resolution while retaining adequate pulse phase resolution. We detected scintillation structure in the spectra of the MSPs PSR B1257+12, PSR J1810+1744, and PSR J2317+1439 with diffractive bandwidths of $6\pm 3$, $2.0\pm 0.3$, and $\sim 7$ kHz, respectively, where the estimate for PSR J2317+1439 is reliable to about a factor of 2. For the brightest of the three pulsars, PSR J1810+1744, we found that the diffractive bandwidth has a power-law behavior $\Delta\nu_d \propto \nu^{\alpha}$, where $\nu$ is the observing frequency and $\alpha = 4.5\pm 0.5$, consistent with a Kolmogorov inhomogeneity spectrum. We conclude that this technique holds promise for monitoring the scattering delay of MSPs with LOFAR and other high-sensitivity, low-frequency arrays like SKA-Low.
  • The hierarchical triple system PSR J0337+1715 offers an unprecedented laboratory to study secular evolution of interacting systems and to explore the complicated mass-transfer history that forms millisecond pulsars and helium-core white dwarfs. The latter in particular, however, requires knowledge of the properties of the individual components of the system. Here we present precise optical spectroscopy of the inner companion in the PSR J0337+1715 system. We confirm it as a hot, low-gravity DA white dwarf with Teff=15,800+/-100 K and log(g)=5.82+/-0.05. We also measure an inner mass ratio of 0.1364+/-0.0015, entirely consistent with that inferred from pulsar timing, and a systemic radial velocity of 29.7+/-0.3 km/s. Combined with the mass (0.19751 Msun) determined from pulsar timing, our measurement of the surface gravity implies a radius of 0.091+/-0.005 Rsun; combined further with the effective temperature and extinction, the photometry implies a distance of 1300+/-80 pc. The high temperature of the companion is somewhat puzzling: with current models, it likely requires a recent period of unstable hydrogen burning, and suggests a surprisingly short lifetime for objects at this phase in their evolution. We discuss the implications of these measurements in the context of understanding the PSR J0337+1715 system, as well as of low-mass white dwarfs in general.
  • The radio millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits complex timing and eclipse behavior. Here we analyze four years' worth of radio monitoring observations of this object. We obtain a long-term timing solution, albeit with large residual timing errors as a result of apparent orbital period variations. We also observe variable eclipses when the companion passes near our line of sight, excess dispersion measure near the eclipses and at random orbital phases, and short-term disappearances of signal at random orbital phases. We interpret the eclipses as possibly due to material in the companion's magnetosphere supported by magnetic pressure, and the orbital period variations as possibly due to a gravitational quadrupole coupling mechanism. Both of these mechanisms would be the result of magnetic activity in the companion, in conflict with evolutionary models that predict it should be fully convective and hence non-magnetic. We also use our timing data to test for orbital and rotational modulation of the system's $\gamma$-ray emission, finding no evidence for orbital modulation and $3.7\sigma$ evidence for modulation at the pulsar period. The energetics of the system make it plausible that the $\gamma$-ray emission we observe is entirely from the millisecond pulsar itself, but it seems unlikely for these $\gamma$-rays to provide the irradiation of the companion, which we attribute instead to X-ray heating from a shock powered by a particle wind.
  • Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict significant deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 +/- 0.04 solar mass pulsar in a 2.46-hr orbit with a 0.172 +/- 0.003 solar mass white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.
  • The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world and is one of our greatest tools for discovering and studying radio pulsars. Over the last decade, the GBT has successfully found over 100 new pulsars through large-area surveys. Here I discuss the two most recent---the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan survey and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. The primary science goal of both surveys is to find interesting individual pulsars, including young pulsars, rotating radio transients, exotic binary systems, and especially bright millisecond pulsars (MSPs) suitable for inclusion in Pulsar Timing Arrays, which are trying to directly detect gravitational waves. These two surveys have combined to discover 85 pulsars to date, among which are 14 MSPs and many unique and fascinating systems. I present highlights from these surveys and discuss future plans. I also discuss recent results from targeted GBT pulsar searches of globular clusters and Fermi sources.
  • Over the summer of 2007, we obtained 1191 hours of `drift-scan' pulsar search observations with the Green Bank Telescope at a radio frequency of 350 MHz. Here we describe the survey setup, search procedure, and the discovery and follow-up timing of thirteen pulsars. Among the new discoveries, one (PSR J1623-0841) was discovered only through its single pulses, two (PSRs J1327-0755 and J1737-0814) are millisecond pulsars, and another (PSR J2222-0137) is a mildly recycled pulsar. PSR J1327-0755 is a 2.7 ms pulsar at a DM of 27.9 pc cm^{-3} in a 8.7 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.22 solar mass. PSR J1737-0814 is a 4.2 ms pulsar at a DM of 55.3 pc cm^{-3} in a 79.3 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.06 solar mass. PSR J2222-0137 is a 32.8 ms pulsar at a very low DM of 3.27 pc cm^{-3} in a 2.4 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 1.11 solar mass. It is most likely a white dwarf-neutron star system or an unusual low-eccentricity double neutron star system. Ten other pulsars discovered in this survey are reported in the companion paper Lynch et al. 2012.
  • We have completed a 350 MHz drift scan survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ~10300 square degrees and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, seven of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. (2012) describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental set-up, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources---two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.
  • We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits (at 1950 MHz) of approximately L < 1.60 mJy kpc^2 for periodic emission and L < 7.6 Jy kpc^2 for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.
  • We present a Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5 sigma) large-amplitude (factor of 2-3) orbital variability over the five consecutive orbits covered by the observation, with a pronounced decline in the flux at all energies at superior conjunction. This can be naturally explained by a partial geometric occultation by the secondary star of an X-ray--emitting intrabinary shock, produced by the interaction of outflows from the two stars. The depth and duration of the eclipse imply that the intrabinary shock is localized near or at the surface of the companion star and close to the inner Lagrangian point. The energetics of the shock favor a magnetically dominated pulsar wind that is focused into the orbital plane, requiring close alignment of the pulsar spin and orbital angular momentum axes. The X-ray spectrum consists of a dominant non-thermal component and at least one thermal component, likely originating from the heated pulsar polar caps, although a portion of this emission may be from an optically-thin "corona". We find no evidence for extended emission due to a pulsar wind nebula or bow shock down to a limiting luminosity of L_X<3.6x10^29 ergs s^-1 (0.3-8 keV), <7x10^-6 of the pulsar spin-down luminosity, for a distance of 1.3 kpc and an assumed power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma=1.5.
  • We report on observations of the unusual neutron-star binary system FIRST J102347.6+003841 carried out using the XMM-Newton satellite. This system consists of a radio millisecond pulsar in an 0.198-day orbit with a ~0.2 solar-mass Roche-lobe-filling companion, and appears to have had an accretion disk in 2001. We observe a hard power-law spectrum (\Gamma = 1.26(4)) with a possible thermal component, and orbital variability in X-ray flux and possibly hardness of the X-rays. We also detect probable pulsations at the pulsar period (single-trial significance ~4.5 sigma from an 11(2)% modulation), which would make this the first system in which both orbital and rotational X-ray pulsations are detected. We interpret the emission as a combination of X-rays from the pulsar itself and from a shock where material overflowing the companion meets the pulsar wind. The similarity of this X-ray emission to that seen from other millisecond pulsar binary systems, in particular 47 Tuc W (PSR J0024-7204W) and PSR J1740-5340, suggests that they may also undergo disk episodes similar to that seen in J1023 in 2001.
  • Radio pulsars with millisecond spin periods are thought to have been spun up by transfer of matter and angular momentum from a low-mass companion star during an X-ray-emitting phase. The spin periods of the neutron stars in several such low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems have been shown to be in the millisecond regime, but no radio pulsations have been detected. Here we report on detection and follow-up observations of a nearby radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) in a circular binary orbit with an optically identified companion star. Optical observations indicate that an accretion disk was present in this system within the last decade. Our optical data show no evidence that one exists today, suggesting that the radio MSP has turned on after a recent LMXB phase.
  • We report the results of 19 years of Arecibo timing for two pulsars in the globular cluster NGC 5904 (M5), PSR B1516+02A (M5A) and PSR B1516+02B (M5B). This has resulted in the measurement of the proper motions of these pulsars and, by extension, that of the cluster itself. M5B is a 7.95-ms pulsar in a binary system with a > 0.13 solar mass companion and an orbital period of 6.86 days. In deep HST images, no optical counterpart is detected within ~2.5 sigma of the position of the pulsar, implying that the companion is either a white dwarf or a low-mass main-sequence star. The eccentricity of the orbit (e = 0.14) has allowed a measurement of the rate of advance of periastron: (0.0142 +/-0.0007) degrees per year. We argue that it is very likely that this periastron advance is due to the effects of general relativity, the total mass of the binary system then being 2.29 +/-0.17 solar masses. The small measured mass function implies, in a statistical sense, that a very large fraction of this total mass is contained in the pulsar: 2.08 +/- 0.19 solar masses (1 sigma); there is a 5% probability that the mass of this object is < 1.72 solar masses and a 0.77% probability that is is between 1.2 and 1.44 solar masses. Confirmation of the median mass for this neutron star would exclude most ``soft'' equations of state for dense neutron matter. Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) appear to have a much wider mass distribution than is found in double neutron star systems; about half of these objects are significantly more massive than 1.44 solar masses. A possible cause is the much longer episode of mass accretion necessary to recycle a MSP, which in some cases corresponds to a much larger mass transfer.
  • We report the discovery of five new millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster NGC 6440 and three new ones in NGC 6441; each cluster has one previously known pulsar. Four of the new pulsars are found in binary systems. One of the new pulsars, PSR J1748-2021B in NGC 6440, is notable for its eccentric (e = 0.57) and wide (P_b = 20.5 days) orbit. If the rate of advance of periastron is due solely to general relativity, we can estimate of the total mass of this binary system: 2.92 +/- 0.20 solar masses. This would imply an anomalously large mass for this pulsar, which could introduce important constraints in the study of the equation of state for cold neutron matter.