• We study the effect of the axion dark matter velocity in the recently proposed dielectric haloscopes, a promising avenue to search for well-motivated high mass ($40-400~\mu$eV) axions. We describe non-zero velocity effects for axion-photon mixing in a magnetic field and for the phenomenon of photon emission from interfaces between different dielectric media. As velocity effects are only important when the haloscope is larger than about 20% of the axion de Broglie wavelength, for the planned MADMAX experiment with 80 dielectric disks the velocity dependence can safely be neglected. However, an augmented MADMAX or a second generation experiment would be directionally sensitive to the axion velocity, and thus a sensitive measure of axion astrophysics.
  • Axions and other very light axion-like particles appear in many extensions of the Standard Model, and are leading candidates to compose part or all of the missing matter of the Universe. They also appear in models of inflation, dark radiation, or even dark energy, and could solve some long-standing astrophysical anomalies. The physics case of these particles has been considerably developed in recent years, and there are now useful guidelines and powerful motivations to attempt experimental detection. Admittedly, the lack of positive signal of new physics at the high energy frontier, and in underground detectors searching for weakly interacting massive particles, is also contributing to the increase of the interest in axion searches. The experimental landscape is rapidly evolving, with many novel detection concepts and new experiments being proposed lately. An updated account of those initiatives is lacking in the literature. In this review we attempt to provide such a review. We will focus on the new experimental approaches and their complementarity, but will also review the most relevant recent results from the consolidated strategies and the prospects of new generation experiments under consideration in the field. We will also briefly review the latest developments of the theory, cosmology and astrophysics of axions and we will discuss the prospects to probe a large fraction of relevant parameter space in the coming decade.
  • We propose, design and construct a variant of the conventional axion haloscope concept that could be competitive in the search for dark matter axions of masses in the decade 10-100 $\mu$eV. Theses masses are located somewhat above the mass range in which existing experiments have reached sensitivity to benchmark QCD axion models. Our haloscope consists of an array of small microwave cavities connected by rectangular irises, in an arrangement commonly used in radio-frequency filters. The size of the unit cavity determines the main resonant frequency, while the possibility to connect a {large} number of cavities allows to reach large detection volumes. We develop the theoretical framework of the detection concept, and present design prescriptions to optimize detection capabilities. We describe the design and realization of a first small-scale prototype of this concept, called Relic Axion Detector Exploratory Setup (RADES). It consists of a copper-coated stainless steel five-cavities microwave filter with the detecting mode operating at around 8.4 GHz. This structure has been electromagnetically characterized at 2 K and 298 K, and it is now placed in ultra-high vacuum in one of the twin-bores of the 9 T CAST dipole magnet at CERN. We describe the data acquisition system developed for relic axion detection, and present preliminary results of the electromagnetic properties of the microwave filter, which show the potential of filters to reach QCD axion window sensitivity at X-band frequencies.
  • The neutrino flux at Earth is dominated in the keV energy range by the neutrinos produced in the Sun through thermal processes, namely photo production, bremsstrahlung, plasmon decay, and emission in free-bound and bound-bound transitions of partially ionized elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. Such a component of the neutrino flux is conspicuously absent from popular analyses of the all-sources spectrum at Earth, whereas if detected it could be a source of information about solar physics. Moreover, it would be the relevant background for keV-mass sterile neutrino dark matter direct searches.
  • There are a number of observational hints from astrophysics which point to the existence of stellar energy losses beyond the ones accounted for by neutrino emission. These excessive energy losses may be explained by the existence of a new sub-keV mass pseudoscalar Nambu--Goldstone boson with tiny couplings to photons, electrons, and nucleons. An attractive possibility is to identify this particle with the axion -- the hypothetical pseudo Nambu--Goldstone boson predicted by the Peccei--Quinn solution to the strong CP problem. We explore this possibility in terms of a DFSZ-type axion and of a KSVZ-type axion/majoron, respectively. Both models allow a good global fit to the data, prefering an axion mass around 10 meV. We show that future axion experiments -- the fifth force experiment ARIADNE and the helioscope IAXO -- can attack the preferred mass range from the lower and higher end, respectively. An axion in this mass range can also be the main constituent of dark matter.
  • We calculate the solar neutrino and antineutrino flux in the keV energy range. The dominant thermal source processes are photoproduction ($\gamma e\to e \nu\bar\nu$), bremsstrahlung ($e+Ze\to Ze+e+\nu\bar\nu$), plasmon decay ($\gamma\to\nu\bar\nu$), and $\nu\bar\nu$ emission in free-bound and bound-bound transitions of partially ionized elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. These latter processes dominate in the energy range of a few keV and thus carry information about the solar metallicity. To calculate their rate we use libraries of monochromatic photon radiative opacities in analogy to a previous calculation of solar axion emission. Our overall flux spectrum and many details differ significantly from previous works. While this low-energy flux is not measurable with present-day technology, it could become a significant background for future direct searches for keV-mass sterile neutrino dark matter.
  • We present a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM) providing a consistent picture of particle physics from the electroweak scale to the Planck scale and of cosmology from inflation until today. Three right-handed neutrinos $N_i$, a new color triplet $Q$ and a complex SM-singlet scalar $\sigma$, whose vacuum expectation value $v_\sigma \sim 10^{11}$ GeV breaks lepton number and a Peccei-Quinn symmetry simultaneously, are added to the SM. At low energies, the model reduces to the SM, augmented by seesaw generated neutrino masses and mixing, plus the axion. The latter solves the strong CP problem and accounts for the cold dark matter in the Universe. The inflaton is comprised by a mixture of $\sigma$ and the SM Higgs, and reheating of the Universe after inflation proceeds via the Higgs portal. Baryogenesis occurs via thermal leptogenesis. Thus, five fundamental problems of particle physics and cosmology are solved at one stroke in this unified Standard Model - Axion - seesaw - Higgs portal inflation (SMASH) model. It can be probed decisively by upcoming cosmic microwave background and axion dark matter experiments.
  • We propose a new strategy to search for dark matter axions in the mass range of 40--400 $\mu$eV by introducing dielectric haloscopes, which consist of dielectric disks placed in a magnetic field. The changing dielectric media cause discontinuities in the axion-induced electric field, leading to the generation of propagating electromagnetic waves to satisfy the continuity requirements at the interfaces. Large-area disks with adjustable distances boost the microwave signal (10--100 GHz) to an observable level and allow one to scan over a broad axion mass range. A sensitivity to QCD axion models is conceivable with 80 disks of 1 m$^2$ area contained in a $10$ Tesla field.
  • A minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM) with a single new mass scale and providing a complete and consistent picture of particle physics and cosmology up to the Planck scale is presented. We add to the SM three right-handed SM-singlet neutrinos, a new vector-like color triplet fermion and a complex SM singlet scalar $\sigma$ that stabilises the Higgs potential and whose vacuum expectation value at $\sim 10^{11}$ GeV breaks lepton number and a Peccei-Quinn symmetry simultaneously. Primordial inflation is produced by a combination of $\sigma$ (non-minimally coupled to the scalar curvature) and the SM Higgs. Baryogenesis proceeds via thermal leptogenesis. At low energies, the model reduces to the SM, augmented by seesaw-generated neutrino masses, plus the axion, which solves the strong CP problem and accounts for the dark matter in the Universe. The model predicts a minimum value of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\simeq 0.004$, running of the scalar spectral index $\alpha\simeq - 7\times 10^{-4}$, the axion mass $m_A\sim 100\,\mu{\rm eV}$ and cosmic axion background radiation corresponding to an increase of the effective number of relativistic neutrinos of $\sim 0.03$. It can be probed decisively by the next generation of cosmic microwave background and axion dark matter experiments.
  • We study the underlying theory of dielectric haloscopes, a new way to detect dark matter axions. When an interface between different dielectric media is inside a magnetic field, the oscillating axion field acts as a source of electromagnetic waves, which emerge in both directions perpendicular to the surface. The emission rate can be boosted by multiple layers judiciously placed to achieve constructive interference and by a large transverse area. Starting from the axion-modified Maxwell equations, we calculate the efficiency of this new dielectric haloscope approach. This technique could potentially search the unexplored high-frequency range of 10--100 GHz (axion mass 40--400 $\mu$eV), where traditional cavity resonators have difficulties reaching the required volume.
  • Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.
  • We discuss the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the presence of hidden photons kinetically mixed with the ordinary electromagnetic photons. The hidden photon field causes a slight phase shift in the observable interference pattern. It is then shown how the limited sensitivity of this experiment can be largely improved. The key observation is that the hidden photon field causes a leakage of the ordinary magnetic field into the supposedly field-free region. The direct measurement of this magnetic field can provide a sensitive experiment with a good discovery potential, particularly below the $\sim$ meV mass range for hidden photons.
  • QCD axions with meV mass can be behind some stellar cooling anomalies and form all or part of the cold dark matter of the universe. We discuss on a proposed experiment to discover the solar flux of meV mass axions: the International AXion Observatory: IAXO.
  • We give a brief update on the search for Hidden Photon Dark Matter with FUNK. The experiment uses a large spherical mirror, which, if Hidden Photon Dark Matter exists in the accessible mass and coupling parameter range, would yield an optical signal in the mirror's center in an otherwise dark environment. After a test run with a CCD, preparations for a run with a low-noise PMT are under way and described in this proceedings.
  • We present a new statistical analysis that combines helioseismology (sound speed, surface helium and convective radius) and solar neutrino observations (the $^8$B and $^7$Be fluxes) to place upper limits to the properties of non standard weakly interacting particles. Our analysis includes theoretical and observational errors, accounts for tensions between input parameters of solar models and can be easily extended to include other observational constraints. We present two applications to test the method: the well studied case of axions and axion-like particles and the more novel case of low mass hidden photons. For axions we obtain an upper limit at $3\sigma$ for the axion-photon coupling constant of $g_{a\gamma}\,<\,4.1 \cdot 10^{-10} \rm{GeV^{-1}}$. For hidden photons we obtain the most restrictive upper limit available accross a wide range of masses for the product of the kinetic mixing and mass of $\chi m < 1.8 \cdot 10^{-12} \rm{eV}$ at $3\sigma$. Both cases improve the previous solar constraints based on the Standard Solar Models showing the power of using a global statistical approach.
  • A time-domain numerical code based on the constitutive relations of nonlinear acoustics for simulating ultrasound propagation is presented. To model frequency power law attenuation, such as observed in biological media, multiple relaxation processes are included and relaxation parameters are fitted to both exact frequency power law attenuation and empirically measured attenuation of a variety of tissues that does not fit an exact power law. A computational technique based on artificial relaxation is included to correct the non-negligible numerical dispersion of the numerical method and to improve stability when shock waves are present. This technique avoids the use of high order finite difference schemes, leading to fast calculations. The numerical code is especially suitable to study high intensity and focused axisymmetric acoustic beams in tissue-like medium, as it is based on the full constitutive relations that overcomes the limitations of the parabolic approximations, while some specific effects not contemplated by the Westervelt equation can be also studied. The accuracy of the method is discussed by comparing the proposed simulation solutions to one-dimensional analytical ones, to $k$-space numerical solutions and also to experimental data from a focused beam propagating in a frequency power law attenuation media.
  • We discuss the impact of a hidden sector consisting of Minicharged Particles (MCPs) and massless hidden photons on the expansion history of our Universe. We present parameter scans for the amount of extra relativistic particles (Neff) and the abundance of light nuclei for fermionic MCPs with masses between ~100 keV and 10 GeV and minicharges in the range 10^(-11)-1. Current CMB and BBN data significantly constrain the available parameter space of MCPs. The shown results are a valuable indicator for future experimental searches and are presented in a flexible way so that more accurate results on Neff can be easily interpreted.
  • We present the results of a search for transversely polarised hidden photons (HPs) with $\sim 3$ eV energies emitted from the Sun. These hypothetical particles, known also as paraphotons or dark sector photons, are theoretically well motivated for example by string theory inspired extensions of the Standard Model. Solar HPs of sub-eV mass can convert into photons of the same energy (photon$\leftrightarrow$HP oscillations are similar to neutrino flavour oscillations). At SHIPS this would take place inside a long light-tight high-vacuum tube, which tracks the Sun. The generated photons would then be focused into a low-noise photomultiplier at the far end of the tube. Our analysis of 330 h of data (and {330 h} of background characterisation) reveals no signal of photons from solar hidden photon conversion. We estimate the rate of newly generated photons due to this conversion to be smaller than 25 mHz/m$^2$ at the 95$%$ C.L. Using this and a recent model of solar HP emission, we set stringent constraints on $\chi$, the coupling constant between HPs and photons, as a function of the HP mass.
  • Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup \`a la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute the flux of transversely polarised HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0-1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.
  • If Dark Matter is composed of hidden-sector photons that kinetically mix with photons of the visible sector, then Dark Matter has a tiny oscillating electric field component. Its presence would lead to a small amount of visible radiation being emitted from a conducting surface, with the photon frequency given approximately by the mass of the hidden photon. Here, we report on experimental efforts that have started recently to search for such hidden photon Dark Matter in the (sub-)eV regime with a prototype mirror for the Auger fluorescence detector at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology.
  • We compute the thermalization of a hidden sector consisting of minicharged fermions (MCPs) and massless hidden photons in the early Universe. The precise measurement of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by Planck and the relic abundance of light nuclei produced during big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) constrain the amount of dark radiation of this hidden sector through the effective number of neutrino species, Neff. This study presents novel and accurate predictions of dark radiation in the strongly and weakly coupled regime for a wide range of model parameters. We give the value of Neff for MCP masses between 100 keV and 10 GeV and minicharges in the range 10^(-11)-1. Our results can be used to constrain MCPs with the current data and they are also a valuable indicator for future experimental searches, should the hint for dark radiation manifest itself in the next release of Planck's data.
  • Recently, indications for an emission line at 3.55 keV have been found in the combined spectra of a large number of galaxy clusters and also in Andromeda. This line could not be identified with any known spectral line. It is tempting to speculate that it has its origin in the decay of a particle contributing all or part of the dark matter. In this note we want to point out that axion-like particles being all or part of the dark matter are an ideal candidate to produce such a feature. More importantly the parameter values necessary are quite feasible in extensions of the Standard Model based on string theory and could be linked up to a variety of other intriguing phenomena, which also potentially allow for new tests of this speculation.
  • This paper describes a model for nonlinear acoustic wave propagation through absorbing and weakly dispersive media, and its numerical solution by means of finite differences in time domain method (FDTD). The attenuation is based on multiple relaxation processes, and provides frequency dependent absorption and dispersion without using computational expensive convolutional operators. In this way, by using an optimization algorithm the coefficients for the relaxation processes can be obtained in order to fit a frequency power law that agrees the experimentally measured attenuation data for heterogeneous media over the typical frequency range for ultrasound medical applications. Our results show that two relaxation processes are enough to fit attenuation data for most soft tissues in this frequency range including the fundamental and the first ten harmonics. Furthermore, this model can fit experimental attenuation data that do not follow exactly a frequency power law over the frequency range of interest. The main advantage of the proposed method is that only one auxiliary field per relaxation process is needed, which implies less computational resources compared with time-domain fractional derivatives solvers based on convolutional operators.
  • Constraints on inflationary scenarios and isocurvature perturbations have excluded the simplest and most generic models of dark matter based on QCD axions. Considering non-minimal kinetic couplings of scalar fields to gravity substantially changes this picture. The axion can account for the observed dark matter density avoiding the overproduction of isocurvature fluctuations. Finally, we show that assuming the same non-minimal kinetic coupling to the axion (dark matter) and to the standard model Higgs boson (inflaton) provides a minimal picture of early time cosmology.
  • This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.