• Given the potential of ensemble asteroseismology for understanding fundamental properties of large numbers of stars, it is critical to determine the accuracy of the scaling relations on which these measurements are based. From several powerful validation techniques, all indications so far show that stellar radius estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations are accurate to within a few percent. Eclipsing binary systems hosting at least one star with detectable solar-like oscillations constitute the ideal test objects for validating asteroseismic radius and mass inferences. By combining radial-velocity measurements and photometric time series of eclipses, it is possible to determine the masses and radii of each component of a double-lined spectroscopic binary. We report the results of a four-year radial-velocity survey performed with the \'echelle spectrometer of the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-m telescope and the APOGEE spectrometer at Apache Point Observatory. We compare the masses and radii of 10 red giants obtained by combining radial velocities and eclipse photometry with the estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations. We find that the asteroseismic scaling relations overestimate red-giant radii by about 5% on average and masses by about 15% for stars at various stages of red-giant evolution. Systematic overestimation of mass leads to underestimation of stellar age, which can have important implications for ensemble asteroseismology used for Galactic studies. As part of a second objective, where asteroseismology is used for understanding binary systems, we confirm that oscillations of red giants in close binaries can be suppressed enough to be undetectable, an hypothesis that was proposed in a previous work.
  • We combine Kepler photometry with ground-based spectra to present a comprehensive dynamical model of the double red giant eclipsing binary KIC 9246715. While the two stars are very similar in mass (M1 = 2.171 [+0.006 / -0.008], M2 = 2.149 [+0.006 / -0.008] Msun) and radius (R1 = 8.37 [+0.03 / -0.07], R2 = 8.30 [+0.04 / -0.03] Rsun), an asteroseismic analysis finds one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes. A second set of oscillations from the other star may exist, but this marginal detection is extremely faint. Because the two stars are nearly twins, KIC 9246715 is a difficult target for a precise test of the asteroseismic scaling relations, which yield M = 2.17 +/- 0.14 Msun and R = 8.26 +/- 0.18 Rsun. Both stars are consistent with the inferred asteroseismic properties, but we suspect the main oscillator is Star 2 because it is less active than Star 1. We find evidence for stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171-day eccentric orbit, which are likely responsible for the essential lack of solar-like oscillations in one star and weak oscillations in the other. Mixed modes indicate the main oscillating star is on the secondary red clump (a core-He-burning star), and stellar evolution modeling supports this with a coeval history for a pair of red clump stars. This system is a useful case study and paves the way for a detailed analysis of more red giants in eclipsing binaries, an important benchmark for asteroseismology.
  • We present an analysis of interstellar absorption lines in high-resolution optical echelle spectra of SS Cyg obtained during an outburst in 2013 June and in archival Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer data. The Ca II K and Na I D lines toward SS Cyg are compared with those toward nearby B and A stars in an effort to place constraints on the distance to SS Cyg. We find that the distance constraints are not very robust from this method due to the rather slow increase in neutral gas column density with distance and the scatter in the column densities from one sight line to another. However, the optical absorption-line measurements allow us to derive a precise estimate for the line-of-sight reddening of E(B-V) = 0.020+/-0.005 mag. Furthermore, our analysis of the absorption lines of O I, Si II, P II, and Fe II seen in the UV spectra yields an estimate of the H I column density and depletion strength in this direction.
  • The light curves of 252 B-star candidates in the Kepler data base are analyzed in a similar fashion to that done by Balona et al. (2011) to further characterize B star variability, increase the sample of variable B stars for future study, and to identify stars whose power spectra include particularly interesting features such as frequency groupings. Stars are classified as either constant light emitters, $\beta$ Cep stars, slowly pulsating B stars, hybrid pulsators, binaries or stars whose light curves are dominated by rotation (Bin/Rot), hot subdwarfs, or white dwarfs. One-hundred stars in our sample were found to be either light contants or to be variable at a level of less than 0.02 mmag. We increase the number of candidate B-star variables found in the Kepler data base by Balona et al. (2011) in the following fashion: $\beta$ Cep stars from 0 to 10, slowly pulsating B stars from 8 to 54, hybrid pulsators from 7 to 21, and Bin/Rot stars from 23 to 82. For comparison purposes, approximately 51 SPBs and 6 hybrids had been known prior to 2007. The number of $\beta$ Cep stars known prior to 2004 was 93. A secondary result of this study is the identification of an additional 11 pulsating white dwarf candidates, four of which possess frequency groupings.