• With the ever increasing computational power available and the development of high-performances computing, investigating the properties of realistic very large-scale nonlinear dynamical systems has been become reachable. It must be noted however that the memory capabilities of computers increase at a slower rate than their computational capabilities. Consequently, the traditional matrix-forming approaches wherein the Jacobian matrix of the system considered is explicitly assembled become rapidly intractable. Over the past two decades, so-called matrix-free approaches have emerged as an efficient alternative. The aim of this chapter is thus to provide an overview of well-grounded matrix-free methods for fixed points computations and linear stability analyses of very large-scale nonlinear dynamical systems.
  • We propose a general dynamic reduced-order modeling framework for typical experimental data: time-resolved sensor data and optional non-time-resolved PIV snapshots. This framework contains four steps. First, the sensor signals are lifted to a dynamic feature space. Second, we identify a sparse human-interpretable nonlinear dynamical system for the feature state based on the sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics (SINDy). Third, if PIV snapshots are available, a local linear mapping from the feature state to velocity fields is shown to be orders of magnitudes more accurate than optimal modal expansions of the same order. Fourth, a generalized feature-based modal decomposition identifies coherent structures that are most dynamically correlated with the linear and nonlinear interaction terms in the sparse model, adding interpretability. Steps 1 and 2 define a black-box model. Optional steps 3 and 4 lift the black-box dynamics to a 'gray-box' model of the coherent structures, if non-time-resolved full-state data is available. This gray-box modeling strategy is successfully applied to the transient and post-transient laminar cylinder wake, and compares favorably with a POD model. We foresee numerous applications of this highly flexible modeling strategy, including estimation, prediction and control. Moreover, the feature space may be based on intrinsic coordinates, which are unaffected by a key challenge of modal expansion: the slow change of low-dimensional coherent structures with changing geometry and varying parameters.
  • The shear-induced deformation of a capsule with a stiff nucleus, a model of eukaryotic cells, is studied numerically. The membrane of the cell and of its nucleus are modelled as a thin and impermeable elastic material obeying a Neo-Hookean constitutive law. The membranes are discretised by a Lagrangian mesh and their governing equations are solved in spectral space using spherical harmonics, while the fluid equations are solved on a staggered grid using a second-order finite differences scheme. The fluid-structure coupling is obtained using an immersed boundary method. The numerical approach is presented and validated for the case of a single capsule in a shear flow. The variations induced by the presence of the nucleus on the cell deformation are investigated when varying the viscosity ratio between the inner and outer fluids, the membrane elasticity and its bending stiffness. The deformation of the eukaryotic cell is smaller than that of the prokaryotic one. The reduction in deformation increases for larger values of the capillary number. The eukaryotic cell remains thicker in its middle part compared to the prokaryotic one, thus making it less flexible to pass through narrow capillaries. For a viscosity ratio of 5, the deformation of the cell is smaller than in the case of uniform viscosity. In addition, for non-zero bending stiffness of the membrane, the deformation decreases and the shape is closer to an ellipsoid. Finally, we compare the results obtained modeling the nucleus as an inner stiffer membrane with those obtained using a rigid particle.
  • Aiming for the simulation of colloidal droplets in microfluidic devices, we present here a numerical method for two-fluid systems subject to surface tension and depletion forces among the suspended droplets. The algorithm is based on a fast, second-order-accurate solver for the incompressible two-phase Navier-Stokes equations, and uses a level set method to capture the fluid interface. The four novel ingredients proposed here are, firstly, an interface-correction level set method (iCLS) that efficiently preserves mass. Global mass conservation is achieved by performing an additional advection near the interface, with a correction velocity obtained by locally solving an algebraic equation, which is easy to implement in both 2D and 3D. Secondly, we report a second-order accurate estimation of the curvature at the interface and, thirdly, the combination of the ghost fluid method with the fast pressure-correction approach enabling an accurate and fast computation even for large density contrasts. Finally, we derive a sharp formulation for the pressure difference across the interface induced by depletion of surfactant micelles and combine it with a multiple level-set approach to study short-range interactions among droplets in the presence of attracting forces.
  • Previous studies have shown that intermediate surface tension has a counterintuitive destabilizing effect on 2-phase planar jets. Here, the transition process in confined 2D jets of two fluids with varying viscosity ratio is investigated using DNS. Neutral curves for persistent oscillations are found by recording the norm of the velocity residuals in DNS for over 1000 nondimensional time units, or until the signal has reached a constant level in a logarithmic scale - either a converged steady state, or a "statistically steady" oscillatory state. Oscillatory final states are found for all viscosity ratios (0.1-10). For uniform viscosity (m=1), the first bifurcation is through a surface tension-driven global instability. For low viscosity of the outer fluid, there is a mode competition between a steady asymmetric Coanda-type attachment mode and the surface tension-induced mode. At moderate surface tension, the Coanda-type attachment dominates and eventually triggers time-dependent convective bursts. At high surface tension, the surface tension-dominated mode dominates. For high viscosity of the outer fluid, persistent oscillations appear due to a strong convective instability. Finally, the m=1 jet remains unstable far from the inlet when the shear profile is nearly constant. Comparing this to a parallel Couette flow (without inflection points), we show that in both flows, a hidden interfacial mode brought out by surface tension becomes temporally and absolutely unstable in an intermediate Weber and Reynolds regime. An energy analysis of the Couette setup shows that surface tension, although dissipative, induces a velocity field near the interface which extracts energy from the flow through a viscous mechanism. This study highlights the rich dynamics of immiscible planar uniform-density jets, where several self-sustained and convective mechanisms compete depending on the exact parameters.
  • Although major advances have been achieved over the past decades for the reduction and identification of linear systems, deriving nonlinear low-order models still is a chal- lenging task. In this work, we develop a new data-driven framework to identify nonlinear reduced-order models of a fluid by combining dimensionality reductions techniques (e.g. proper orthogonal decomposition) and sparse regression techniques from machine learn- ing. In particular, we extend the sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics (SINDy) algorithm to enforce physical constraints in the regression, namely energy-preserving quadratic nonlinearities. The resulting models, hereafter referred to as Galerkin regression models, incorporate many beneficial aspects of Galerkin projection, but without the need for a full-order or high-fidelity solver to project the Navier-Stokes equations. Instead, the most parsimonious nonlinear model is determined that is consistent with observed mea- surement data and satisfies necessary constraints. Galerkin regression models also readily generalize to include higher-order nonlinear terms that model the effect of truncated modes. The effectiveness of Galerkin regression is demonstrated on two different flow configurations: the two-dimensional flow past a circular cylinder and the shear-driven cavity flow. For both cases, the accuracy of the identified models compare favorably against reduced-order models obtained from a standard Galerkin projection procedure. Present results highlight the importance of cubic nonlinearities in the construction of accurate nonlinear low-dimensional approximations of the flow systems, something which cannot be readily obtained using a standard Galerkin projection of the Navier-Stokes equations. Finally, the entire code base for our constrained sparse Galerkin regression algorithm is freely available online.
  • Transition from steady state to intermittent chaos in the cubical lid-driven flow is investigated numerically. Fully three-dimensional stability analyses have revealed that the flow experiences an Andronov-Poincar\'e-Hopf bifurcation at a critical Reynolds number $Re_c$ = 1914. As for the 2D-periodic lid-driven cavity flows, the unstable mode originates from a centrifugal instability of the primary vortex core. A Reynolds-Orr analysis reveals that the unstable perturbation relies on a combination of the lift-up and anti lift-up mechanisms to extract its energy from the base flow. Once linearly unstable, direct numerical simulations show that the flow is driven toward a primary limit cycle before eventually exhibiting intermittent chaotic dynamics. Though only one eigenpair of the linearized Navier-Stokes operator is unstable, the dynamics during the intermittencies are surprisingly well characterized by one of the stable eigenpairs.
  • We introduce a modified and simplified version of the pre-existing fully parallelized three-dimensional Navier--Stokes flow solver known as TPLS. We demonstrate how the simplified version can be used as a pedagogical tool for the study of computational fluid dynamics and parallel computing. TPLS is at its heart a two-phase flow solver, and uses calls to a range of external libraries to accelerate its performance. However, in the present context we narrow the focus of the study to basic hydrodynamics and parallel computing techniques, and the code is therefore simplified and modified to simulate pressure-driven single-phase flow in a channel, using only relatively simple Fortran 90 code with MPI parallelization, but no calls to any other external libraries. The modified code is analysed in order to both validate its accuracy and investigate its scalability up to 1000 CPU cores. Simulations are performed for several benchmark cases in pressure-driven channel flow, including a turbulent simulation, wherein the turbulence is incorporated via the large-eddy simulation technique. The work may be of use to advanced undergraduate and graduate students as an introductory study in computational fluid dynamics, while also providing insight for those interested in more general aspects of high-performance computing.