• We present the results of a Herschel survey of 21 late-type stars that host planets discovered by the radial velocity technique. The aims were to discover new disks in these systems and to search for any correlation between planet presence and disk properties. In addition to the known disk around GJ 581, we report the discovery of two new disks, in the GJ 433 and GJ 649 systems. Our sample therefore yields a disk detection rate of 14%, higher than the detection rate of 1.2% among our control sample of DEBRIS M-type stars with 98% confidence. Further analysis however shows that the disk sensitivity in the control sample is about a factor of two lower in fractional luminosity than for our survey, lowering the significance of any correlation between planet presence and disk brightness below 98%. In terms of their specific architectures, the disk around GJ 433 lies at a radius somewhere between 1 and 30au. The disk around GJ 649 lies somewhere between 6 and 30au, but is marginally resolved and appears more consistent with an edge-on inclination. In both cases the disks probably lie well beyond where the known planets reside (0.06-1.1au), but the lack of radial velocity sensitivity at larger separations allows for unseen Saturn-mass planets to orbit out to $\sim$5au, and more massive planets beyond 5au. The layout of these M-type systems appears similar to Sun-like star + disk systems with low-mass planets.
  • Millimeter-wave continuum astronomy is today an indispensable tool for both general Astrophysics studies and Cosmology. General purpose, large field-of-view instruments are needed to map the sky at intermediate angular scales not accessible by the high-resolution interferometers and by the coarse angular resolution space-borne or ground-based surveys. These instruments have to be installed at the focal plane of the largest single-dish telescopes. In this context, we have constructed and deployed a multi-thousands pixels dual-band (150 and 260 GHz, respectively 2mm and 1.15mm wavelengths) camera to image an instantaneous field-of-view of 6.5arc-min and configurable to map the linear polarization at 260GHz. We are providing a detailed description of this instrument, named NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays 2), in particular focusing on the cryogenics, the optics, the focal plane arrays based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) and the readout electronics. We are presenting the performance measured on the sky during the commissioning runs that took place between October 2015 and April 2017 at the 30-meter IRAM (Institut of Millimetric Radio Astronomy) telescope at Pico Veleta. NIKA2 has been successfully deployed and commissioned, performing in-line with the ambitious expectations. In particular, NIKA2 exhibits FWHM angular resolutions of around 11 and 17.5 arc-seconds at respectively 260 and 150GHz. The NEFD (Noise Equivalent Flux Densities) demonstrated on the maps are, at these two respective frequencies, 33 and 8 mJy*sqrt(s). A first successful science verification run has been achieved in April 2017. The instrument is currently offered to the astronomical community during the coming winter and will remain available for at least the next ten years.
  • We present the first ALMA observations of the closest known extrasolar debris disc. This disc orbits the star $\epsilon$ Eridani, a K-type star just 3.2pc away. Due to the proximity of the star, the entire disc cannot fit within the ALMA field of view. Therefore, the observations have been centred 18" North of the star, providing us with a clear detection of the northern arc of the ring, at a wavelength of 1.3mm. The observed disc emission is found to be narrow with a width of just 11-13AU. The fractional disc width we find is comparable to that of the Solar System's Kuiper Belt and makes this one of the narrowest debris discs known. If the inner and outer edges are due to resonances with a planet then this planet likely has a semi-major axis of 48AU. We find tentative evidence for clumps in the ring, although there is a strong chance that at least one is a background galaxy. We confirm, at much higher significance, the previous detection of an unresolved emission at the star that is above the level of the photosphere and attribute this excess to stellar chromospheric emission.
  • Debris discs are evidence of the ongoing destructive collisions between planetesimals, and their presence around stars also suggests that planets exist in these systems. In this paper, we present submillimetre images of the thermal emission from debris discs that formed the SCUBA-2 Observations of Nearby Stars (SONS) survey, one of seven legacy surveys undertaken on the James Clerk Maxwell telescope between 2012 and 2015. The overall results of the survey are presented in the form of 850 microns (and 450 microns, where possible) images and fluxes for the observed fields. Excess thermal emission, over that expected from the stellar photosphere, is detected around 49 stars out of the 100 observed fields. The discs are characterised in terms of their flux density, size (radial distribution of the dust) and derived dust properties from their spectral energy distributions. The results show discs over a range of sizes, typically 1-10 times the diameter of the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt in our Solar System. The mass of a disc, for particles up to a few millimetres in size, is uniquely obtainable with submillimetre observations and this quantity is presented as a function of the host stars' age, showing a tentative decline in mass with age. Having doubled the number of imaged discs at submillimetre wavelengths from ground-based, single dish telescope observations, one of the key legacy products from the SONS survey is to provide a comprehensive target list to observe at high angular resolution using submillimetre/millimetre interferometers (e.g., ALMA, SMA).
  • We present observations of Epsilon Eridani from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 1.3 millimeters and from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 7 millimeters that reach an angular resolution of ~4" (13 AU). These first millimeter interferometer observations of Epsilon Eridani, which hosts the closest debris disk to the Sun, reveal two distinct emission components: (1) the well-known outer dust belt, which, although patchy, is clearly resolved in the radial direction, and (2) an unresolved source coincident with the position of the star. We use direct model-fitting of the millimeter visibilities to constrain the basic properties of these two components. A simple Gaussian shape for the outer belt fit to the SMA data results in a radial location of $64.4^{+2.4}_{-3.0}$ AU and FWHM of $20.2^{+6.0}_{-8.2}$ AU (fractional width $\Delta R/R = 0.3$. Similar results are obtained taking a power law radial emission profile for the belt, though the power law index cannot be usefully constrained. Within the noise obtained (0.2 mJy/beam), these data are consistent with an axisymmetric belt model and show no significant azimuthal structure that might be introduced by unseen planets in the system. These data also limit any stellocentric offset of the belt to $<9$ AU, which disfavors the presence of giant planets on highly eccentric ($>0.1$) and wide (10's of AU) orbits. The flux density of the unresolved central component exceeds predictions for the stellar photosphere at these long wavelengths, by a marginally significant amount at 1.3 millimeters but by a factor of a few at 7 millimeters (with brightness temperature $13000 \pm 1600$ K for a source size of the optical stellar radius). We attribute this excess emission to ionized plasma from a stellar corona or chromosphere.
  • The debris disk closest to Earth is the one around the star epsilon Eridani at a distance of 3.2 pc. It is the prime target for detailed studies of a belt of planetesimals left from the early phase of planet formation other than the Kuiper Belt. The non-uniform ring-like structure around epsilon Eridani, originally discovered at lambda=850 microns with the bolometer camera SCUBA, could be the signpost of unseen long-period planets interior to the disk that gravitationally interact with it through mean-motion resonances. However, the reliability of the structure at 850 microns, which has been debated, has not been verified with independent observations until now. We present a high signal-to-noise ratio image of this structure at lambda=1.2 mm made with the bolometer camera MAMBO and compare this with the SCUBA image. We have found that three of the four emission clumps (NE, NW, SW) and the two deep hollows to the east and west are at the same positions in the MAMBO and SCUBA images within astrometric uncertainty. The SE clump is at odds, significantly brighter and more extended in the SCUBA than in the MAMBO images, but it is possible that this mismatch is an artifact. We conclude that this degree of positional coincidence provides tentative evidence that the observed structure is robust. In addition, we present the radial brightness profile of our MAMBO image and show that the width of the planetesimal belt around epsilon Eridani is narrower than 22 AU, a more stringent upper limit than determined from previous observations. The corresponding relative width is $0.1 < \Delta R / R < 0.4$, which is lower than for the Kuiper Belt.
  • Debris disks have been found primarily around intermediate and solar mass stars (spectral types A-K), but rarely around low-mass M-type stars. This scarcity of detections in M star surveys can be confronted with the predictions of the steady state collisional evolution model. First, we determine the parameters of the disk population evolved with this model and fit to the distribution of the fractional dust luminosities measured in the surveys of A- and FGK-type stars observed by the infrared satellite Spitzer. Thus, in our approach, we stipulate that the initial disk mass distribution is bimodal and that only high-mass collisionally-dominated disks are detected. The best determined parameter is the diameter $D_c$ of the largest planetesimals in the collisional cascade of the model, which ranges between 2 and 60 km, consistently for disks around A- and FGK-type stars. Second, we assume that the same disk population surrounds the M dwarfs that have been the subjects of debris disk searches in the far-infrared with Spitzer and at submillimeter wavelengths with radiotelescopes. We find, in the framework of our study, that this disk population, which has been fit to the AFGK data, is still consistent with the observed lack of disks around M dwarfs with Spitzer.
  • A debris disk is a constituent of any planetary system surrounding a main sequence star. We study whether close stellar encounters can disrupt and strip a debris disk of its planetesimals in the expanding open cluster of its birth with a decreasing star number density over 100 Myrs. Such stripping would affect the dust production and hence detectability of the disk. We tabulated the fractions of planetesimals stripped off during stellar flybys of miss distances between 100 and 1000 AU and for several mass ratios of the central to passing stars. We then estimated the numbers of close stellar encounters over the lifetime of several expanding open clusters characterized by their initial star densities. We found that a standard disk, with inner and outer radii of 40 and 100 AU, suffers no loss of planetesimals over 100 Myrs around a star born in a common embedded cluster with star density <1000 pc^-3. In contrast, we found that such a disk is severely depleted of its planetesimals over this timescale around a star born in an Orion-type cluster where the star density is >20 000 pc^-3. In this environment, a disk loses >97% of its planetesimals around an M-dwarf, >63% around a solar-type star, and >42% around an A-dwarf, over 100 Myrs. We roughly estimate that two-thirds of the stars may be born in such high star density clusters. This might explain in part why fewer debris disks are observed around lower mass stars.
  • We have used multi-epoch long-baseline radio interferometry to determine the proper motion and orbital elements of Algol and UX Arietis, two radio-bright, close binary stellar systems with distant tertiary components. For Algol, we refine the proper motion and outer orbit solutions, confirming the recent result of Zavala et al. (2010) that the inner orbit is retrograde. The radio centroid closely tracks the motion of the KIV secondary. In addition, the radio morphology varies from double-lobed at low flux level to crescent-shaped during active periods. These results are most easily interpreted as synchrotron emission from a large, co-rotating meridional loop centered on the K-star. If this is correct, it provides a radio-optical frame tie candidate with an uncertainty {\pm}0.5 mas. For UX Arietis, we find a outer orbit solution that accounts for previous VLBI observations of an acceleration term in the proper motion fit. The outer orbit solution is also consistent with previously published radial velocity curves and speckle observations of a third body. The derived tertiary mass, 0.75 solar masses, is consistent with the K1 main-sequence star detected spectroscopically. The inner orbit solution favors radio emission from the active K0IV primary only. The radio morphology, consisting of a single, partially resolved emission region, may be associated with the persistent polar spot observed using Doppler imaging.
  • We present results from the earliest observations of DEBRIS, a Herschel Key Programme to conduct a volume- and flux-limited survey for debris discs in A-type through M-type stars. PACS images (from chop/nod or scan-mode observations) at 100 and 160 micron are presented toward two A-type stars and one F-type star: beta Leo, beta UMa and eta Corvi. All three stars are known disc hosts. Herschel spatially resolves the dust emission around all three stars (marginally, in the case of beta UMa), providing new information about discs as close as 11 pc with sizes comparable to that of the Solar System. We have combined these data with existing flux density measurements of the discs to refine the SEDs and derive estimates of the fractional luminosities, temperatures and radii of the discs.
  • The rare and conspicuous flux density variations of some radio sources (extragalactic and pulsars) for periods of weeks to months have been denoted Extreme Scattering Events (ESE's) by Fiedler et al. (1987). Presently, there is no astrophysical mechanism that satisfactorily produces this phenomenon. In this paper, we conjecture that inhomogeneities of the electronic density in the turbulent interstellar medium might be the origin of this phenomenon. We have tested this conjecture by a simulation of the scintillation of the pulsar B1937+21 at 1.4 GHz and 1.7 GHz for a period of six months. To this end, we have constructed a large square Kolmogorov phase screen made of 131k x 131k pixels with electron inhomogeneity scales ranging from 6 x $10^6$ m to $10^{12}$ m and used the Kirchhoff-Fresnel integral to simulate dynamic spectra of a pulsar within the framework of Physical Optics. The simulated light curves exhibit a 10 day long variation simultaneously at 1.41 and 1.7 GHz that is alike the ``ESE'' observed with the Nancay radiotelescope toward the pulsar B1937+21 in October 1989. Consequently, we conclude that ``ESE'' toward pulsars can be caused naturally by the turbulence in the ionized interstellar medium instead of invoking the crossing of discrete over pressured ionized clouds on the line of sight as in the model of Fiedler et al. (1987). We suggest that longer events could occur in a simulation of scintillation, if larger electron inhomogeneities > $10^{12}$ m were included in the construction of the Kolmogorov phase screen. This next step requires a supercomputer.
  • The most complete catalogue of nearby stars (Gliese and Jarheiss, 1991) has been used to search for the stars whose photospheric thermal emission can be detected by the future millimeter array ALMA. We found that 446 nearby stars with spectral types ranging from A to M are detectable. A long-term astrometric observation programme (> 10 yr) of these stars with ALMA (theoretical astrometric precision = 0.1 milliarcsecond) would be sensitive to wobbles caused by the gravitational pull of possible unseen planets. Such a programme would probe minimum planetary masses as low as 0.1 Jupiter for an orbital period of 10 years. We provide histogrammes of these minimum masses and of ALMA integration times for these 446 ALMA stars.