• This paper introduces a new nonlinear dictionary learning method for histograms in the probability simplex. The method leverages optimal transport theory, in the sense that our aim is to reconstruct histograms using so-called displacement interpolations (a.k.a. Wasserstein barycenters) between dictionary atoms; such atoms are themselves synthetic histograms in the probability simplex. Our method simultaneously estimates such atoms, and, for each datapoint, the vector of weights that can optimally reconstruct it as an optimal transport barycenter of such atoms. Our method is computationally tractable thanks to the addition of an entropic regularization to the usual optimal transportation problem, leading to an approximation scheme that is efficient, parallel and simple to differentiate. Both atoms and weights are learned using a gradient-based descent method. Gradients are obtained by automatic differentiation of the generalized Sinkhorn iterations that yield barycenters with entropic smoothing. Because of its formulation relying on Wasserstein barycenters instead of the usual matrix product between dictionary and codes, our method allows for nonlinear relationships between atoms and the reconstruction of input data. We illustrate its application in several different image processing settings.
  • Merging galaxy clusters present a unique opportunity to study the properties of dark matter in an astrophysical context. These are rare and extreme cosmic events in which the bulk of the baryonic matter becomes displaced from the dark matter halos of the colliding subclusters. Since all mass bends light, weak gravitational lensing is a primary tool to study the total mass distribution in such systems. Combined with X-ray and optical analyses, mass maps of cluster mergers reconstructed from weak-lensing observations have been used to constrain the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter. The dynamically complex Abell 520 (A520) cluster is an exceptional case, even among merging systems: multi-wavelength observations have revealed a surprising high mass-to-light concentration of dark mass, the interpretation of which is difficult under the standard assumption of effectively collisionless dark matter. We revisit A520 using a new sparsity-based mass-mapping algorithm to independently assess the presence of the puzzling dark core. We obtain high-resolution mass reconstructions from two separate galaxy shape catalogs derived from Hubble Space Telescope observations of the system. Our mass maps agree well overall with the results of previous studies, but we find important differences. In particular, although we are able to identify the dark core at a certain level in both data sets, it is at much lower significance than has been reported before using the same data. As we cannot confirm the detection in our analysis, we do not consider A520 as posing a significant challenge to the collisionless dark matter scenario.
  • Blind Source Separation (BSS) is a challenging matrix factorization problem that plays a central role in multichannel imaging science. In a large number of applications, such as astrophysics, current unmixing methods are limited since real-world mixtures are generally affected by extra instrumental effects like blurring. Therefore, BSS has to be solved jointly with a deconvolution problem, which requires tackling a new inverse problem: deconvolution BSS (DBSS). In this article, we introduce an innovative DBSS approach, called DecGMCA, based on sparse signal modeling and an efficient alternative projected least square algorithm. Numerical results demonstrate that the DecGMCA algorithm performs very well on simulations. It further highlights the importance of jointly solving BSS and deconvolution instead of considering these two problems independently. Furthermore, the performance of the proposed DecGMCA algorithm is demonstrated on simulated radio-interferometric data.
  • Removing the aberrations introduced by the Point Spread Function (PSF) is a fundamental aspect of astronomical image processing. The presence of noise in observed images makes deconvolution a nontrivial task that necessitates the use of regularisation. This task is particularly difficult when the PSF varies spatially as is the case for the Euclid telescope. New surveys will provide images containing thousand of galaxies and the deconvolution regularisation problem can be considered from a completely new perspective. In fact, one can assume that galaxies belong to a low-rank dimensional space. This work introduces the use of the low-rank matrix approximation as a regularisation prior for galaxy image deconvolution and compares its performance with a standard sparse regularisation technique. This new approach leads to a natural way to handle a space variant PSF. Deconvolution is performed using a Python code that implements a primal-dual splitting algorithm. The data set considered is a sample of 10 000 space-based galaxy images convolved with a known spatially varying Euclid-like PSF and including various levels of Gaussian additive noise. Performance is assessed by examining the deconvolved galaxy image pixels and shapes. The results demonstrate that for small samples of galaxies sparsity performs better in terms of pixel and shape recovery, while for larger samples of galaxies it is possible to obtain more accurate estimates of the galaxy shapes using the low-rank approximation.
  • Peak statistics in weak lensing maps access the non-Gaussian information contained in the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are therefore a promising complement to two-point and higher-order statistics to constrain our cosmological models. To prepare for the high-precision data of next-generation surveys, we assess the constraining power of peak counts in a simulated Euclid-like survey on the cosmological parameters $\Omega_\mathrm{m}$, $\sigma_8$, and $w_0^\mathrm{de}$. In particular, we study how the Camelus model--a fast stochastic algorithm for predicting peaks--can be applied to such large surveys. We measure the peak count abundance in a mock shear catalogue of ~5,000 sq. deg. using a multiscale mass map filtering technique. We then constrain the parameters of the mock survey using Camelus combined with approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). We find that peak statistics yield a tight but significantly biased constraint in the $\sigma_8$-$\Omega_\mathrm{m}$ plane, indicating the need to better understand and control the model's systematics. We calibrate the model to remove the bias and compare results to those from the two-point correlation functions (2PCF) measured on the same field. In this case, we find the derived parameter $\Sigma_8=\sigma_8(\Omega_\mathrm{m}/0.27)^\alpha=0.76_{-0.03}^{+0.02}$ with $\alpha=0.65$ for peaks, while for 2PCF the value is $\Sigma_8=0.76_{-0.01}^{+0.02}$ with $\alpha=0.70$. We therefore see comparable constraining power between the two probes, and the offset of their $\sigma_8$-$\Omega_\mathrm{m}$ degeneracy directions suggests that a combined analysis would yield tighter constraints than either measure alone. As expected, $w_0^\mathrm{de}$ cannot be well constrained without a tomographic analysis, but its degeneracy directions with the other two varied parameters are still clear for both peaks and 2PCF. (abridged)
  • We propose a new mass-mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. In order to preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. We test our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion which are lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures at the 15$^{\prime \prime}$ scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass-mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse .
  • The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology, and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting such information from microwave surveys requires disentangling between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which boils down to solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of CMB temperature anisotropies but quite rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to discriminate between the various components. More recent methods, which rather emphasize on the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimate of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, the present paper introduces a new component separation technique dubbed PolGMCA (Polarized Generalized Morphological Component Analysis), which refines previous work to specifically tackle the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components, ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM), which show that the proposed method achieve a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low noise/foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements with respect to standard methods, especially on the galactic center where estimating the CMB is challenging.
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • We compare the efficiency with which 2D and 3D weak lensing mass mapping techniques are able to detect clusters of galaxies using two state-of-the-art mass reconstruction techniques: MRLens in 2D and GLIMPSE in 3D. We simulate otherwise-empty cluster fields for 96 different virial mass-redshift combinations spanning the ranges $3\times10^{13}h^{-1}M_\odot \le M_{vir}\le 10^{15}h^{-1}M_\odot$ and $0.05 \le z_{\rm cl} \le 0.75$, and for each generate 1000 realisations of noisy shear data in 2D and 3D. For each field, we then compute the cluster (false) detection rate as the mean number of cluster (false) detections per reconstruction over the sample of 1000 reconstructions. We show that both MRLens and GLIMPSE are effective tools for the detection of clusters from weak lensing measurements, and provide comparable quality reconstructions at low redshift. At high redshift, GLIMPSE reconstructions offer increased sensitivity in the detection of clusters, yielding cluster detection rates up to a factor of $\sim 10\times$ that seen in 2D reconstructions using MRLens. We conclude that 3D mass mapping techniques are more efficient for the detection of clusters of galaxies in weak lensing surveys than 2D methods, particularly since 3D reconstructions yield unbiased estimators of both the mass and redshift of the detected clusters directly.
  • The exceptional sensitivity of the SKA will allow observations of the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization (CD/EoR) in unprecedented detail, both spectrally and spatially. This wealth of information is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, which must be removed accurately and precisely in order to reveal the cosmological signal. This problem has been addressed already for the previous generation of radio telescopes, but the application to SKA is different in many aspects. In this chapter we summarise the contributions to the field of foreground removal in the context of high redshift and high sensitivity 21-cm measurements. We use a state-of-the-art simulation of the SKA Phase 1 observations complete with cosmological signal, foregrounds and frequency-dependent instrumental effects to test both parametric and non-parametric foreground removal methods. We compare the recovered cosmological signal using several different statistics and explore one of the most exciting possibilities with the SKA --- imaging of the ionized bubbles. We find that with current methods it is possible to remove the foregrounds with great accuracy and to get impressive power spectra and images of the cosmological signal. The frequency-dependent PSF of the instrument complicates this recovery, so we resort to splitting the observation bandwidth into smaller segments, each of a common resolution. If the foregrounds are allowed a random variation from the smooth power law along the line of sight, methods exploiting the smoothness of foregrounds or a parametrization of their behaviour are challenged much more than non-parametric ones. However, we show that correction techniques can be implemented to restore the performances of parametric approaches, as long as the first-order approximation of a power law stands.
  • We give an overview of complementarity and synergy in cosmology between the Square Kilometre Array and future survey projects in other wavelengths. In the SKA era, precision cosmology will be limited by systematic errors and cosmic variance, rather than statistical errors. However, combining and/or cross-correlating multi-wavelength data, from the SKA to the cosmic microwave background, optical/infrared and X-ray, substantially reduce these limiting factors. In this chapter, we summarize future survey projects and show highlights of complementarity and synergy, which can be very powerful to probe major cosmological problems such as dark energy, modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity.
  • Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.
  • Blind source separation (BSS) is a very popular technique to analyze multichannel data. In this context, the data are modeled as the linear combination of sources to be retrieved. For that purpose, standard BSS methods all rely on some discrimination principle, whether it is statistical independence or morphological diversity, to distinguish between the sources. However, dealing with real-world data reveals that such assumptions are rarely valid in practice: the signals of interest are more likely partially correlated, which generally hampers the performances of standard BSS methods. In this article, we introduce a novel sparsity-enforcing BSS method coined Adaptive Morphological Component Analysis (AMCA), which is designed to retrieve sparse and partially correlated sources. More precisely, it makes profit of an adaptive re-weighting scheme to favor/penalize samples based on their level of correlation. Extensive numerical experiments have been carried out which show that the proposed method is robust to the partial correlation of sources while standard BSS techniques fail. The AMCA algorithm is evaluated in the field of astrophysics for the separation of physical components from microwave data.
  • In large-scale spatial surveys, such as the forthcoming ESA Euclid mission, images may be undersampled due to the optical sensors sizes. Therefore, one may consider using a super-resolution (SR) method to recover aliased frequencies, prior to further analysis. This is particularly relevant for point-source images, which provide direct measurements of the instrument point-spread function (PSF). We introduce SPRITE, SParse Recovery of InsTrumental rEsponse, which is an SR algorithm using a sparse analysis prior. We show that such a prior provides significant improvements over existing methods, especially on low SNR PSFs.
  • Non-negative blind source separation (non-negative BSS), which is also referred to as non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), is a very active field in domains as different as astrophysics, audio processing or biomedical signal processing. In this context, the efficient retrieval of the sources requires the use of signal priors such as sparsity. If NMF has now been well studied with sparse constraints in the direct domain, only very few algorithms can encompass non-negativity together with sparsity in a transformed domain since simultaneously dealing with two priors in two different domains is challenging. In this article, we show how a sparse NMF algorithm coined non-negative generalized morphological component analysis (nGMCA) can be extended to impose non-negativity in the direct domain along with sparsity in a transformed domain, with both analysis and synthesis formulations. To our knowledge, this work presents the first comparison of analysis and synthesis priors ---as well as their reweighted versions--- in the context of blind source separation. Comparisons with state-of-the-art NMF algorithms on realistic data show the efficiency as well as the robustness of the proposed algorithms.
  • Non-negative blind source separation (BSS) has raised interest in various fields of research, as testified by the wide literature on the topic of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). In this context, it is fundamental that the sources to be estimated present some diversity in order to be efficiently retrieved. Sparsity is known to enhance such contrast between the sources while producing very robust approaches, especially to noise. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm in order to tackle the blind separation of non-negative sparse sources from noisy measurements. We first show that sparsity and non-negativity constraints have to be carefully applied on the sought-after solution. In fact, improperly constrained solutions are unlikely to be stable and are therefore sub-optimal. The proposed algorithm, named nGMCA (non-negative Generalized Morphological Component Analysis), makes use of proximal calculus techniques to provide properly constrained solutions. The performance of nGMCA compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms is demonstrated by numerical experiments encompassing a wide variety of settings, with negligible parameter tuning. In particular, nGMCA is shown to provide robustness to noise and performs well on synthetic mixtures of real NMR spectra.
  • We present GLIMPSE - Gravitational Lensing Inversion and MaPping with Sparse Estimators - a new algorithm to generate density reconstructions in three dimensions from photometric weak lensing measurements. This is an extension of earlier work in one dimension aimed at applying compressive sensing theory to the inversion of gravitational lensing measurements to recover 3D density maps. Using the assumption that the density can be represented sparsely in our chosen basis - 2D transverse wavelets and 1D line of sight dirac functions - we show that clusters of galaxies can be identified and accurately localised and characterised using this method. Throughout, we use simulated data consistent with the quality currently attainable in large surveys. We present a thorough statistical analysis of the errors and biases in both the redshifts of detected structures and their amplitudes. The GLIMPSE method is able to produce reconstructions at significantly higher resolution than the input data; in this paper we show reconstructions with 6x finer redshift resolution than the shear data. Considering cluster simulations with 0.05 <= z <= 0.75 and 3e13/h Msun <= Mvir <= 1e15/h Msun, we show that the redshift extent of detected peaks is typically 1-2 pixels, or Dz <~ 0.07, and that we are able to recover an unbiased estimator of the redshift of a detected cluster by considering many realisations of the noise. We also recover an accurate estimator of the mass, that is largely unbiased when the redshift is known, and whose bias is constrained to <~ 5% in the majority of our simulations when the estimated redshift is taken to be the true redshift. This shows a substantial improvement over earlier 3D inversion methods, which showed redshift smearing with a typical standard deviation of 0.2-0.3, a significant damping of the amplitude of the peaks detected, and a bias in the detected redshift.
  • Astronomical images suffer a constant presence of multiple defects that are consequences of the intrinsic properties of the acquisition equipments, and atmospheric conditions. One of the most frequent defects in astronomical imaging is the presence of additive noise which makes a denoising step mandatory before processing data. During the last decade, a particular modeling scheme, based on sparse representations, has drawn the attention of an ever growing community of researchers. Sparse representations offer a promising framework to many image and signal processing tasks, especially denoising and restoration applications. At first, the harmonics, wavelets, and similar bases and overcomplete representations have been considered as candidate domains to seek the sparsest representation. A new generation of algorithms, based on data-driven dictionaries, evolved rapidly and compete now with the off-the-shelf fixed dictionaries. While designing a dictionary beforehand leans on a guess of the most appropriate representative elementary forms and functions, the dictionary learning framework offers to construct the dictionary upon the data themselves, which provides us with a more flexible setup to sparse modeling and allows to build more sophisticated dictionaries. In this paper, we introduce the Centered Dictionary Learning (CDL) method and we study its performances for astronomical image denoising. We show how CDL outperforms wavelet or classic dictionary learning denoising techniques on astronomical images, and we give a comparison of the effect of these different algorithms on the photometry of the denoised images.
  • A multiscale representation-based denoising method for spherical data contaminated with Poisson noise, the multiscale variance stabilizing transform on the sphere (MS-VSTS), has been previously proposed. This paper first extends this MS-VSTS to spherical two and one dimensions data (2D-1D), where the two first dimensions are longitude and latitude, and the third dimension is a meaningful physical index such as energy or time. We then introduce a novel multichannel deconvolution built upon the 2D-1D MS-VSTS, which allows us to get rid of both the noise and the blur introduced by the point spread function (PSF) in each energy (or time) band. The method is applied to simulated data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, which detects high energy gamma-rays in a very wide energy range (from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV), and whose PSF is strongly energy-dependent (from about 3.5{\deg} at 100 MeV to less than 0.1{\deg} at 10 GeV).
  • The aperture mass statistic is a common tool used in weak lensing studies. By convolving lensing maps with a filter function of a specific scale, chosen to be larger than the scale on which the noise is dominant, the lensing signal may be boosted with respect to the noise. This allows for detection of structures at increased fidelity. Furthermore, higher-order statistics of the aperture mass (such as its skewness or kurtosis), or counting of the peaks seen in the resulting aperture mass maps, provide a convenient and effective method to constrain the cosmological parameters. In this paper, we more fully explore the formalism underlying the aperture mass statistic. We demonstrate that the aperture mass statistic is formally identical to a wavelet transform at a specific scale. Further, we show that the filter functions most frequently used in aperture mass studies are not ideal, being non-local in both real and Fourier space. In contrast, the wavelet formalism offers a number of wavelet functions that are localized both in real and Fourier space, yet similar to the 'optimal' aperture mass filters commonly adopted. Additionally, for a number of wavelet functions, such as the starlet wavelet, very fast algorithms exist to compute the wavelet transform. This offers significant advantages over the usual aperture mass algorithm when it comes to image processing time, demonstrating speed-up factors of ~ 5 - 1200 for aperture radii in the range 2 to 64 pixels on an image of 1024 x 1024 pixels.
  • Weak gravitational lensing has become a common tool to constrain the cosmological model. The majority of the methods to derive constraints on cosmological parameters use second-order statistics of the cosmic shear. Despite their success, second-order statistics are not optimal and degeneracies between some parameters remain. Tighter constraints can be obtained if second-order statistics are combined with a statistic that is efficient to capture non-Gaussianity. In this paper, we search for such a statistical tool and we show that there is additional information to be extracted from statistical analysis of the convergence maps beyond what can be obtained from statistical analysis of the shear field. For this purpose, we have carried out a large number of cosmological simulations along the {\sigma}8-{\Omega}m degeneracy, and we have considered three different statistics commonly used for non-Gaussian features characterization: skewness, kurtosis and peak count. To be able to investigate non-Gaussianity directly in the shear field we have used the aperture mass definition of these three statistics for different scales. Then, the results have been compared with the results obtained with the same statistics estimated in the convergence maps at the same scales. First, we show that shear statistics give similar constraints to those given by convergence statistics, if the same scale is considered. In addition, we find that the peak count statistic is the best to capture non-Gaussianities in the weak lensing field and to break the {\sigma}8-{\Omega}m degeneracy. We show that this statistical analysis should be conducted in the convergence maps: first, because there exist fast algorithms to compute the convergence map for different scales, and secondly because it offers the opportunity to denoise the reconstructed convergence map, which improves non-Gaussian features extraction.
  • (Abridged) Weak gravitational lensing is an ideal probe of the dark universe. In recent years, several linear methods have been developed to reconstruct the density distribution in the Universe in three dimensions, making use of photometric redshift information to determine the radial distribution of lensed sources. In this paper, we aim to address three key issues seen in these methods; namely, the bias in the redshifts of detected objects, the line of sight smearing seen in reconstructions, and the damping of the amplitude of the reconstruction relative to the underlying density. We consider the problem under the framework of compressed sensing (CS). Under the assumption that the data are sparse in an appropriate dictionary, we construct a robust estimator and employ state-of-the-art convex optimisation methods to reconstruct the density contrast. For simplicity in implementation, and as a proof of concept of our method, we reduce the problem to one-dimension, considering the reconstruction along each line of sight independently. Despite the loss of information this implies, we demonstrate that our method is able to accurately reproduce cluster haloes up to a redshift of z=1, deeper than state-of-the-art linear methods. We directly compare our method with these linear methods, and demonstrate minimal radial smearing and redshift bias in our reconstructions, as well as a reduced damping of the reconstruction amplitude as compared to the linear methods. In addition, the CS framework allows us to consider an underdetermined inverse problem, thereby allowing us to reconstruct the density contrast at finer resolution than the input data.
  • We study the uncertainty in different two-point correlation function (2PCF) estimators in currently available galaxy surveys. This is motivated by the active subject of using the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) feature in the correlation function as a tool to constrain cosmological parameters, which requires a fine analysis of the statistical significance. We discuss how estimators are affected by both the uncertainty in the mean density $\bar{n}$ and the integral constraint $\frac{1}{V^2}\int_{V^2} \hat{\xi} (r) d^3r =0$ which necessarily causes a bias. We quantify both effects for currently available galaxy samples using simulated mock catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) following a lognormal model, with a Lambda-Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda\text{CDM}$) correlation function and similar properties as the samples (number density, mean redshift for the $\Lambda\text{CDM}$ correlation function, survey geometry, mass-luminosity bias). Because we need extensive simulations to quantify small statistical effects, we cannot use realistic N-body simulations and some physical effects are neglected. Our simulations still enable a comparison of the different estimators by looking at their biases and variances. We also test the reliability of the BAO detection in the SDSS samples and study the compatibility of the data results with our $\Lambda\text{CDM}$ simulations.
  • In this paper, we propose two algorithms for solving linear inverse problems when the observations are corrupted by noise. A proper data fidelity term (log-likelihood) is introduced to reflect the statistics of the noise (e.g. Gaussian, Poisson). On the other hand, as a prior, the images to restore are assumed to be positive and sparsely represented in a dictionary of waveforms. Piecing together the data fidelity and the prior terms, the solution to the inverse problem is cast as the minimization of a non-smooth convex functional. We establish the well-posedness of the optimization problem, characterize the corresponding minimizers, and solve it by means of primal and primal-dual proximal splitting algorithms originating from the field of non-smooth convex optimization theory. Experimental results on deconvolution, inpainting and denoising with some comparison to prior methods are also reported.
  • In this paper, we propose two algorithms for solving linear inverse problems when the observations are corrupted by Poisson noise. A proper data fidelity term (log-likelihood) is introduced to reflect the Poisson statistics of the noise. On the other hand, as a prior, the images to restore are assumed to be positive and sparsely represented in a dictionary of waveforms. Piecing together the data fidelity and the prior terms, the solution to the inverse problem is cast as the minimization of a non-smooth convex functional. We establish the well-posedness of the optimization problem, characterize the corresponding minimizers, and solve it by means of primal and primal-dual proximal splitting algorithms originating from the field of non-smooth convex optimization theory. Experimental results on deconvolution and comparison to prior methods are also reported.