• Laser wakefield acceleration modeling using the Lorentz-boosted frame technique in the particle-in-cell code has demonstrated orders of magnitude speedups. A convergence study was previously conducted in cases with external injection in the linear regime and without injection in the nonlinear regime, and the obtained results have shown a convergence within the percentage level. In this article, a convergence study is carried out to model electron self-injection in the 2-1/2D configuration. It is observed that the Lorentz-boosted frame technique is capable of modeling complex particle dynamics with a significant speedup. This result is crucial to curtail the computational time of the modeling of future chains of $10\,\mathrm{GeV}$ laser wakefield accelerator stages with high accuracy.
  • The beam hosing instability is analyzed theoretically for a witness beam in the quasi-linear regime of plasma accelerators. In this regime, the hosing instability saturates, even for a monoenergetic bunch, at a level much less than standard scalings predict. Analytic expressions are derived for the saturation distance and amplitude and are in agreement with numerical results. Saturation is due to the natural head-to-tail variations in the focusing force, including the self-consistent transverse beam loading.
  • The advent of massively parallel supercomputers, with their distributed-memory technology using many processing units, has favored the development of highly-scalable local low-order solvers at the expense of harder-to-scale global very high-order spectral methods. Indeed, FFT-based methods, which were very popular on shared memory computers, have been largely replaced by finite-difference (FD) methods for the solution of many problems, including plasmas simulations with electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell methods. For some problems, such as the modeling of so-called "plasma mirrors" for the generation of high-energy particles and ultra-short radiations, we have shown that the inaccuracies of standard FD-based PIC methods prevent the modeling on present supercomputers at sufficient accuracy. We demonstrate here that a new method, based on the use of local FFTs, enables ultrahigh-order accuracy with unprecedented scalability, and thus for the first time the accurate modeling of plasma mirrors in 3D.
  • Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations are a widely used tool for the investigation of both laser- and beam-driven plasma acceleration. It is a known issue that the beam quality can be artificially degraded by numerical Cherenkov radiation (NCR) resulting primarily from an incorrectly modeled dispersion relation. Pseudo-spectral solvers featuring infinite order stencils can strongly reduce NCR, or even suppress it, and are therefore well suited to correctly model the beam properties. For efficient parallelization of the PIC algorithm, however, localized solvers are inevitable. Arbitrary order pseudo-spectral methods provide this needed locality. Yet, these methods can again be prone to NCR. Here, we show that acceptably low solver orders are sufficient to correctly model the physics of interest, while allowing for parallel computation by domain decomposition.
  • Representing the electrodynamics of relativistically drifting particle ensembles in discrete, co-propagating Galilean coordinates enables the derivation of a Particle-in-Cell algorithm that is intrinsically free of the Numerical Cherenkov Instability, for plasmas flowing at a uniform velocity. Application of the method is shown by modeling plasma accelerators in a Lorentz-transformed optimal frame of reference.
  • Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic flowing plasmas are of key interest to several fields of physics (including e.g. laser-wakefield acceleration, when viewed in a Lorentz-boosted frame), but remain sometimes infeasible due to the well-known numerical Cherenkov instability (NCI). In this article, we show that, for a plasma drifting at a uniform relativistic velocity, the NCI can be eliminated by simply integrating the PIC equations in Galilean coordinates that follow the plasma (also sometimes known as comoving coordinates) within a spectral analytical framework. The elimination of the NCI is verified empirically and confirmed by a theoretical analysis of the instability. Moreover, it is shown that this method is applicable both to Cartesian geometry and to cylindrical geometry with azimuthal Fourier decomposition.
  • We propose a spectral Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that is based on the combination of a Hankel transform and a Fourier transform. For physical problems that have close-to-cylindrical symmetry, this algorithm can be much faster than full 3D PIC algorithms. In addition, unlike standard finite-difference PIC codes, the proposed algorithm is free of numerical dispersion. This algorithm is benchmarked in several situations that are of interest for laser-plasma interactions. These benchmarks show that it avoids a number of numerical artifacts, that would otherwise affect the physics in a standard PIC algorithm - including the zero-order numerical Cherenkov effect.
  • Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.
  • The family of generalized Pseudo-Spectral Time Domain (including the Pseudo-Spectral Analytical Time Domain) Particle-in-Cell algorithms offers substantial versatility for simulating particle beams and plasmas, and well written codes using these algorithms run reasonably fast. When simulating relativistic beams and streaming plasmas in multiple dimensions, they are, however, subject to the numerical Cherenkov instability. Previous studies have shown that instability growth rates can be reduced substantially by modifying slightly the transverse fields as seen by the streaming particles . Here, we offer an approach which completely eliminates the fundamental mode of the numerical Cherenkov instability while minimizing the transverse field corrections. The procedure, numerically computed residual growth rates (from weaker, higher order instability aliases), and comparisons with WARP simulations are presented. In some instances, there are no numerical instabilities whatsoever, at least in the linear regime.
  • A procedure for largely suppressing the numerical Cherenkov instability in finite difference time-domain (FDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of cold, relativistic beams is derived, and residual growth rates computed and compared with WARP code simulation results. Sample laser-plasma acceleration simulation output is provided to further validate the new procedure.
  • Toward the goal of maximizing the impact of computer modeling on the design of future particle accelerators and the development of new accelerator techniques & technologies, this white paper presents the rationale for: (a) strengthening and expanding programmatic activities in accelerator modeling science within the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) and (b) increasing the community-wide coordination and integration of code development.
  • The pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain (PSATD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm solves the vacuum Maxwell's equations exactly, has no Courant time-step limit (as conventionally defined), and offers substantial flexibility in plasma and particle beam simulations. It is, however, not free of the usual numerical instabilities, including the numerical Cherenkov instability, when applied to relativistic beam simulations. This paper presents several approaches that, when combined with digital filtering, almost completely eliminate the numerical Cherenkov instability. The paper also investigates the numerical stability of the PSATD algorithm at low beam energies.
  • The pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain (PSATD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm solves the vacuum Maxwell's equations exactly, has no Courant time-step limit (as conventionally defined), and offers substantial flexibility in plasma and particle beam simulations. It is, however, not free of the usual numerical instabilities, including the numerical Cherenkov instability, when applied to relativistic beam simulations. This paper derives and solves the numerical dispersion relation for the PSATD algorithm and compares the results with corresponding behavior of the more conventional pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) and finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms. In general, PSATD offers superior stability properties over a reasonable range of time steps. More importantly, one version of the PSATD algorithm, when combined with digital filtering, is almost completely free of the numerical Cherenkov instability for time steps (scaled to the speed of light) comparable to or smaller than the axial cell size.
  • A method is proposed to generate low emittance electron bunches from two color laser pulses in a laser-plasma accelerator. A two-region gas structure is used, containing a short region of a high-Z gas (e.g., krypton) for ionization injection, followed by a longer region of a low-Z gas for post-acceleration. A long-laser-wavelength (e.g., 5 micron) pump pulse excites plasma wake without triggering the inner-shell electron ionization of the high-Z gas due to low electric fields. A short-laser-wavelength (e.g., 0.4 micron) injection pulse, located at a trapping phase of the wake, ionizes the inner-shell electrons of the high-Z gas, resulting in ionization-induced trapping. Compared with a single-pulse ionization injection, this scheme offers an order of magnitude smaller residual transverse momentum of the electron bunch, which is a result of the smaller vector potential amplitude of the injection pulse.
  • Rapidly growing numerical instabilities routinely occur in multidimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations of plasma-based particle accelerators, astrophysical phenomena, and relativistic charged particle beams. Reducing instability growth to acceptable levels has necessitated higher resolution grids, high-order field solvers, current filtering, etc. except for certain ratios of the time step to the axial cell size, for which numerical growth rates and saturation levels are reduced substantially. This paper derives and solves the cold beam dispersion relation for numerical instabilities in multidimensional, relativistic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell programs employing either the standard or the Cole-Karkkainnen finite difference field solver on a staggered mesh and the common Esirkepov current-gathering algorithm. Good overall agreement is achieved with previously reported results of the WARP code. In particular, the existence of select time steps for which instabilities are minimized is explained. Additionally, an alternative field interpolation algorithm is proposed for which instabilities are almost completely eliminated for a particular time step in ultra-relativistic simulations.