• We report the discovery of a microlensing planet --- MOA-2016-BLG-227Lb --- with a large planet/host mass ratio of $q \simeq 9 \times 10^{-3}$. This event was located near the $K2$ Campaign 9 field that was observed by a large number of telescopes. As a result, the event was in the microlensing survey area of a number of these telescopes, and this enabled good coverage of the planetary light curve signal. High angular resolution adaptive optics images from the Keck telescope reveal excess flux at the position of the source above the flux of the source star, as indicated by the light curve model. This excess flux could be due to the lens star, but it could also be due to a companion to the source or lens star, or even an unrelated star. We consider all these possibilities in a Bayesian analysis in the context of a standard Galactic model. Our analysis indicates that it is unlikely that a large fraction of the excess flux comes from the lens, unless solar type stars are much more likely to host planets of this mass ratio than lower mass stars. We recommend that a method similar to the one developed in this paper be used for other events with high angular resolution follow-up observations when the follow-up observations are insufficient to measure the lens-source relative proper motion.
  • Oxygen (O) and carbon (C) have been inferred recently to be subsolar in abundance from spectra of the atmosphere of the transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Yet, the mass and radius of the planet coupled with structure models indicate a strongly supersolar abundance of heavy elements in the interior of this object. Here we explore the discrepancy between the large amount of heavy elements suspected in the planet's interior and the paucity of volatiles measured in its atmosphere. We describe the formation sequence of the icy planetesimals formed beyond the snow line of the protoplanetary disk and calculate the composition of ices ultimately accreted in the envelope of HD 189733b on its migration pathway. This allows us to reproduce the observed volatile abundances by adjusting the mass of ices vaporized in the envelope. The predicted elemental mixing ratios should be 0.15--0.3 times solar in the envelope of HD 189733b if they are fitted to the recent O and C determinations. However, our fit to the minimum mass of heavy elements predicted by internal structure models gives elemental abundances that are 1.2--2.4 times oversolar in the envelope of HD189733b. We propose that the most likely cause of this discrepancy is irradiation from the central star leading to development of a radiative zone in the planet's outer envelope which would induce gravitational settling of elements. Hence, all strongly irradiated extrasolar planets should present subsolar abundances of volatiles. We finally predict that the abundances of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P) are of $\sim$ $2.8 \times 10^{-5}$, $5.3 \times 10^{-6}$ and $1.8 \times 10^{-7}$ relative to H$_2$, respectively in the atmosphere of HD 189733b.
  • The increasing number of transiting planets raises the possibility of finding changes in their transit time, duration and depth that could be indicative of further planets in the system. Experience from eclipsing binaries indeed shows that such changes may be expected. A first obvious candidate to look for a perturbing planet is GJ 436, which hosts a hot transiting Neptune-mass planet in an eccentric orbit. Ribas et al. (2008) suggested that such eccentricity and a possible change in the orbital inclination might be due to a perturbing small planet in a close-in orbit. A radial velocity signal of a 5 M_earth planet close to the 2:1 mean-motion resonance seemed to provide the perfect candidate. Recent new radial velocities have deemed such signal spurious. Here we put all the available information in context and we evaluate the possibility of a small perturber to GJ 436 b to explain its eccentricity and possible inclination change. In particular, we discuss the constraints provided by the transit time variation data. We conclude that, given the current data, the close-in perturber scenario still offers a plausible explanation to the observed orbital and physical properties of GJ 436 b.
  • We study the formation conditions of icy planetesimals in protoplanetary disks in order to determine the composition of ices in small and cold extrasolar planets. Assuming that ices are formed from hydrates, clathrates, and pure condensates, we calculate their mass fractions with respect to the total quantity of ices included in planetesimals, for a grid of disk models. We find that the composition of ices weakly depends on the adopted disk thermodynamic conditions, and is rather influenced by the initial composition of the gas phase. The use of a plausible range of molecular abundance ratios and the variation of the relative elemental carbon over oxygen ratio in the gas phase of protoplanetary disks, allow us to apply our model to a wide range of planetary systems. Our results can thus be used to constrain the icy/volatile phase composition of cold planets evidenced by microlensing surveys, hypothetical ocean-planets and carbon planets, which could be detected by Corot or Kepler.
  • Water is predicted to be among, if not the most abundant molecular species after hydrogen in the atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets (hot-Jupiters) Several attempts have been made to detect water on an exoplanet, but have failed to find compelling evidence for it or led to claims that should be taken with caution. Here we report an analysis of recent observations of the hot-Jupiter HD189733b taken during the transit, where the planet passed in front of its parent star. We find that absorption by water vapour is the most likely cause of the wavelength-dependent variations in the effective radius of the planet at the infrared wavelengths 3.6, 5.8 and 8 microns. The larger effective radius observed at visible wavelengths may be due to either star variability or the presence of clouds/hazes. We explain the most recent thermal infrared observations of the planet during secondary transit behind the star, reporting a non-detection of water on HD189733b, as being a consequence of the nearly isothermal vertical profile of the planet.s atmosphere. Our results show that water is detectable on extrasolar planets using the primary transit technique and that the infrared should be a better wavelength region than the visible, for such searches.
  • Extrasolar planets as light as a few Earths are now being detected. Such planets are likely not gas or ice giants. Here, we present a study on the possible properties of the small and cold extrasolar planets, applied to the case of the recently discovered planet OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb (Beaulieu et al. 2006). This planet (5.5[+5.5/-2.7] Earth masses) orbits 2.6[+1.5/-0.6]-astronomical units away from an old M-type star of the Galactic Bulge. The planet should be entirely frozen given the low surface temperature (35 to 47 K). However, depending on the rock-to-ice mass ratio in the planet, the radiogenic heating could be sufficient to make the existence of liquid water within an icy crust possible. This possibility is estimated as a function of the planetary mass and the illumination received from the parent star, both being strongly related by the observational constraints. The results are presented for water-poor and water-rich planets. We find that no oceans can be present in any cases at 9-10 Gyr, a typical age for a star of the Bulge. However, we find that, in the past when the planet was < 5-billion-years old, liquid water was likely present below an icy surface. Nevertheless, the planet is now likely to be entirely frozen.
  • The pulsational properties of the Cepheid models along the evolutionary tracks from the Padova group (Girardi et al.), as calculated with our turbulent convective pulsation code, are in good agreement with the resonance constraints imposed by the observational OGLE-2 data of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds. Our study suggests that the P_4/P_1=1/2 resonance for the overtone Cepheids occurs for periods clustering around 4.2 d, in disagreement with the suggestion of Antonello & Poretti based on the observations of light curves, but in agreement with Kienzle et al. and Feuchtinger et al. For the fundamental Cepheids the lowest order Fourier decomposition coefficients from the light curves, \viz R_21 and phi_21 can be used to locate the resonance region, but not so for the first overtone Cepheids. Here, the radial velocity curves can be used to locate the overtone resonance region, or in their absence, one needs to resort to numerical hydrodynamic modelling.