• Recent detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes opened new possibilities to study the evolution of massive stars and black hole formation. In particular, stellar evolution models may be constrained on the basis of the differences in the predicted distribution of black hole masses and redshifts. In this work we propose a framework that combines galaxy and stellar evolution models and use it to predict the detection rates of merging binary black holes for various stellar evolution models. We discuss the prospects of constraining the shape of the time delay distribution of merging binaries using just the observed distribution of chirp masses. Finally, we consider a generic model of primordial black hole formation and discuss the possibility of distinguishing it from stellar-origin black holes.
  • Relativistic contributions to the dynamics of structure formation come in a variety of forms, and can potentially give corrections to the standard picture on typical scales of 100 Mpc. These corrections cannot be obtained by Newtonian numerical simulations, so it is important to accurately estimate the magnitude of these relativistic effects. Density fluctuations couple to produce a background of gravitational waves, which is larger than any primordial background. A similar interaction produces a much larger spectrum of vector modes which represent the frame-dragging rotation of spacetime. These can change the metric at the percent level in the concordance model at scales below the equality scale. Vector modes modify the lensing of background galaxies by large-scale structure. This gives in principle the exciting possibility of measuring relativistic frame dragging effects on cosmological scales. The effects of the non-linear tensor and vector modes on the cosmic convergence are computed and compared to first-order lensing contributions from density fluctuations, Doppler lensing, and smaller Sachs-Wolfe effects. The lensing from gravitational waves is negligible so we concentrate on the vector modes. We show the relative importance of this for future surveys such as Euclid and SKA. We find that these non-linear effects only marginally affect the overall weak lensing signal so they can safely be neglected in most analyses, though are still much larger than the linear Sachs-Wolfe terms. The second-order vector contribution can dominate the first-order Doppler lensing term at moderate redshifts and are actually more important for survey geometries like the SKA.
  • Unresolved and resolved sources of gravitational waves are at the origin of a stochastic gravitational wave background. While the computation of its mean density as a function of frequency in a homogeneous and isotropic universe is standard lore, the computation of its anisotropies requires to understand the coarse graining from local systems, to galactic scales and then to cosmology. An expression of the gravitational wave energy density valid in any general spacetime is derived. It is then specialized to a perturbed Friedmann-Lema\^itre spacetime in order to determine the angular power spectrum of this stochastic background as well as its correlation with other cosmological probes, such as the galaxy number counts and weak lensing. Our result for the angular power spectrum also provides an expression for the variance of the gravitational wave background.
  • The existence of a light or massive scalar field with a coupling to matter weaker than gravitational strength is a possible source of violation of the weak equivalence principle. We use the first results on the E\"otv\"os parameter by the MICROSCOPE experiment to set new constraints on such scalar fields. For a massive scalar field of mass smaller than $10^{-12}$ eV (i.e. range larger than a few $10^5$ m) we improve existing constraints by one order of magnitude to $|\alpha|<10^{-11}$ if the scalar field couples to the baryon number and to $|\alpha|<10^{-12}$ if the scalar field couples to the difference between the baryon and the lepton numbers. We also consider a model describing the coupling of a generic dilaton to the standard matter fields with five parameters, for a light field: we find that for masses smaller than $10^{-12}$eV, the constraints on the dilaton coupling parameters are improved by one order of magnitude compared to previous equivalence principle tests.
  • The gravitational wave radiation emitted by all, resolved and unresolved, astrophysical sources in the observable universe generates a stochastic background. This background has a directional dependence inherited from the inhomogeneities of the matter distribution. This article proposes a new and independent derivation of the angular dependence of its energy density by focusing on the total gravitational wave signal produced by an ensemble of incoherent sources. This approach clarifies the origin of the angular correlation and the relation between the gravitational wave signal that can be measured by interferometers and the energy density of the stochastic background.
  • We present the first predictions for the angular power spectrum of the astrophysical gravitational wave background constituted of the radiation emitted by all resolved and unresolved astrophysical sources. Its shape and amplitude depend on both the astrophysical properties on galactic scales and on cosmological properties. We show that the angular power spectrum behaves as $C_{\ell}\propto 1/{\ell}$ on large scales and that relative fluctuations of the signal are of order 30% at 100 Hz. We also present the correlations of the astrophysical gravitational wave background with weak-lensing and galaxy distribution. These numerical results pave the way to the study of a new observable at the crossroad between general relativity, astrophysics and cosmology.
  • This article extends bimetric formulations of massive gravity to make the mass of the graviton to depend on its environment. This minimal extension offers a novel way to reconcile massive gravity with local tests of general relativity without invoking the Vainshtein mechanism. On cosmological scales, it is argued that the model is stable and that it circumvents the Higuchi bound, hence relaxing the constraints on the parameter space. Moreover, with this extension the strong coupling scale is also environmentally dependent in such a way that it is kept sufficiently higher than the expansion rate all the way up to the very early universe, while the present graviton mass is low enough to be phenomenologically interesting. In this sense the extended bigravity theory serves as a partial UV completion of the standard bigravity theory. This extension is very generic and robust and a simple specific example is described.
  • Primordial nucleosynthesis is one of the three historical evidences for the big bang model, together with the expansion of the universe and the cosmic microwave background. Now that the number of neutrino families and the baryonic densities have been fixed by laboratory measurements or CMB observations, the model has no free parameter and its predictions are rigid. Departure from its predictions could provide hints or constraints on new physics or astrophysics in the early universe. Precision on primordial abundances deduced from observations have recently been drastically improved and reach the percent level for both deuterium and helium-4. Accordingly, the BBN predictions should reach the same level of precision. For most isotopes, the dominant sources of uncertainty come from those on the laboratory thermonuclear reactions. This article focuses on helium-4 whose predicted primordial abundance depends essentially on weak interactions which control the neutron-proton ratio. The rates of the various weak interaction processes depend on the experimentally measured neutron lifetime, but also includes numerous corrections that we thoroughly investigate here. They are the radiative, zero-temperature, corrections, finite nucleon mass corrections, finite temperature radiative corrections, weak-magnetism, and QED plasma effects, which are for the first time all included and calculated in a self consistent way, allowing to take into account the correlations between them, and verifying that all satisfy detailed balance. The helium-4 predicted mass fraction is $0.24709\pm0.00017$. In addition, we provide a Mathematica code (PRIMAT) that incorporates, not only these corrections but also a full network of reactions, using the best available thermonuclear reaction rates, allowing the predictions of primordial abundances up to the CNO region.
  • Following the renewed interest for axions as a dark matter component, we revisit the effects of energy loss by axion emission on the evolution of the first generation of stars. These stars with zero metallicity are supposed to be massive, more compact, and hotter than subsequent generations. It is hence important to extend previous studies restricted to solar metallicity stars. Our analysis first compares the evolution of solar metallicity 8, 10 and 12 M$_\odot$ stars to previous work. We then calculate the evolution of 8 zero metallicity stars with and without axion losses and with masses ranging from 20 to 150 M$_\odot$. For the solar metallicity models, we confirm the disappearance of the blue loop phase for a value of the axion-photon coupling, $g_{a\gamma}=10^{-10} {\rm GeV}^{-1}$. Regarding the Pop. III stars, we show that for $g_{a\gamma}=10^{-10} {\rm GeV}^{-1}$, their evolution is not much affected by axion losses except within the range of masses 80$-$130 M$_\odot$. Such stars show significant differences both in their tracks within the $T_c$-$\rho_c$ diagram and in their central composition (in particular $^{20}$Ne and $^{24}$Mg). We discuss the origin of these modifications from the stellar physics point of view, and their potential observational signatures.
  • The standard theory of weak gravitational lensing relies on the infinitesimal light beam approximation. In this context, images are distorted by convergence and shear, the respective sources of which unphysically depend on the resolution of the distribution of matter---the so-called Ricci-Weyl problem. In this letter, we propose a strong-lensing-inspired formalism to describe the lensing of finite beams. We address the Ricci-Weyl problem by showing explicitly that convergence is caused by the matter enclosed by the beam, regardless of its distribution. Furthermore, shear turns out to be systematically enhanced by the finiteness of the beam. This implies, in particular, that the Kaiser-Squires relation between shear and convergence is violated, which could have profound consequences on the interpretation of weak lensing surveys.
  • The properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarisation anisotropies measured by a static, off-centered observer located in a local spherically symmetric void, are described. In particular in this paper we compute, together with the standard 2- point angular correlation functions, the off-diagonal correlators, which are no more vanishing by symmetry. While the energy shift induced by the off-centered position of the observer can be suppressed by a proper choice of the observer velocity, a lensing-like effect on the CMB emission point remains. This latter effect is genuinely geometrical (e.g. non-degenerate with a boost) and reflects in the structure of the off-diagonal correlators. At lowest order in this effect, the temperature and polarisation correlation matrices have non-vanishing diagonal elements, as usual, and all the off-diagonal terms are excited. This particular signature of a local void model allows one, in principle, to disentangle geometrical effects from local kinematical ones in CMB observations.
  • This article details the computation of the two-point correlators of the convergence, $E$- and $B$-modes of the cosmic shear induced by the weak-lensing by large scale structure assuming that the background spacetime is spatially homogeneous and anisotropic. After detailing the perturbation equations and the general theory of weak-lensing in an anisotropic universe, it develops a weak shear approximation scheme in which one can compute analytically the evolution of the Jacobi matrix. It allows one to compute the angular power spectrum of the $E$- and $B$-modes. In the linear regime, the existence of $B$-modes is a direct tracer of a late time anisotropy and their angular power spectrum scales as the square of the shear. It is then demonstrated that there must also exist off-diagonal correlations between the $E$-modes, $B$-modes and convergence that are linear in the geometrical shear and allow one to reconstruct the eigendirections of expansion. These spectra can be measured in future large scale surveys, such as Euclid and SKA, and offer a new tool to test the isotropy of the expansion of the universe at low redshift.
  • We compute the angular power spectrum of the $B$-modes of the weak-lensing shear in a spatially anisotropic spacetime. We find that there must also exist off-diagonal correlations between the $E$-modes, $B$-modes, and convergence that allow one to reconstruct the eigendirections of expansion. Focusing on future surveys such as Euclid and SKA, we show that observations can constrain the geometrical shear in units of the Hubble rate at the percent level, or even better, offering a new and powerful method to probe our cosmological model.
  • This article reviews the properties and limitations associated with the existence of particle, visual, and event horizons in cosmology in general and in inflationary universes in particular, carefully distinguishing them from `Hubble horizons'. It explores to what extent one might be able to probe conditions beyond the visual horizon (which is close in size to the present Hubble radius), thereby showing that visual horizons place major limits on what are observationally testable aspects of a multiverse, if such exists. Indeed these limits largely prevent us from observationally proving a multiverse either does or does not exist. We emphasize that event horizons play no role at all in observational cosmology, even in the multiverse context, despite some claims to the contrary in the literature.
  • Modeling the stochastic gravitational wave background from various astrophysical sources is a key objective in view of upcoming observations with ground- and space-based gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO, VIRGO, eLISA and PTA. We develop a synthetic model framework that follows the evolution of single and binary compact objects in an astrophysical context. We describe the formation and merger rates of binaries, the evolution of their orbital parameters with time and the spectrum of emitted gravitational waves at different stages of binary evolution. Our approach is modular and allows us to test and constrain different ingredients of the model, including stellar evolution, black hole formation scenarios and the properties of binary systems. We use this framework in the context of a particularly well-motivated astrophysical setup to calculate the gravitational wave background from several types of sources, including inspiraling stellar-mass binary black holes that have not merged during a Hubble time. We find that this signal, albeit weak, has a characteristic shape that can help constrain the properties of binary black holes in a way complementary to observations of the background from merger events. We discuss possible applications of our framework in the context of other gravitational wave sources, such as supermassive black holes.
  • Over the past century, rooted in the theory of general relativity, cosmology has developed a very successful physical model of the universe: the {\em big-bang model}. Its construction followed different stages to incorporate nuclear processes, the understanding of the matter present in the universe, a description of the early universe and of the large scale structure. This model has been confronted to a variety of observations that allow one to reconstruct its expansion history, its thermal history and the structuration of matter. Hence, what we refer to as the big-bang model today is radically different from what one may have had in mind a century ago. This construction changed our vision of the universe, both on observable scales and for the universe as a whole. It offers in particular physical models for the origins of the atomic nuclei, of matter and of the large scale structure. This text summarizes the main steps of the construction of the model, linking its main predictions to the observations that back them up. It also discusses its weaknesses, the open questions and problems, among which the need for a dark sector including dark matter and dark energy.
  • The recent detection of the binary black hole merger GW150914 demonstrates the existence of black holes more massive than previously observed in X-ray binaries in our Galaxy. This article explores different scenarios of black hole formation in the context of self-consistent cosmic chemical evolution models that simultaneously match observations of the cosmic star formation rate, optical depth to reionization and metallicity of the interstellar medium. This framework is used to calculate the mass distribution of merging black hole binaries and its evolution with redshift. We also study the implications of the black hole mass distribution for the stochastic gravitational wave background from mergers and from core collapse events.
  • On the scale of the light beams subtended by small sources, e.g. supernovae, matter cannot be accurately described as a fluid, which questions the applicability of standard cosmic lensing to those cases. In this article, we propose a new formalism to deal with small-scale lensing as a diffusion process: the Sachs and Jacobi equations governing the propagation of narrow light beams are treated as Langevin equations. We derive the associated Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations, and use them to deduce general analytical results on the mean and dispersion of the angular distance. This formalism is applied to random Einstein-Straus Swiss-cheese models, allowing us to: (1) show an explicit example of the involved calculations; (2) check the validity of the method against both ray-tracing simulations and direct numerical integrations of the Langevin equation. As a byproduct, we obtain a post-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder approximation, accounting for the effect of tidal distortions on the angular distance, in excellent agreement with numerical results. Besides, the dispersion of the angular distance is correctly reproduced in some regimes.
  • Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historical strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D/H, to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we re-evaluates the D(p,g)3He, D(d,n)3He and D(d,p)3H reaction rates that govern deuterium destruction, incorporating new experimental data and carefully accounting for systematic uncertainties. Contrary to previous evaluations, we use theoretical ab initio models for the energy dependence of the S-factors. As a result, these rates increase at BBN temperatures, leading to a reduced value of D/H = (2.45$\pm0.10)\times10^{-5}$ (2$\sigma$), in agreement with observations.
  • We consider the entropy associated with the large-scale structure of the Universe in the linear regime, where the Universe can be described by a perturbed Friedmann-Lema\^itre spacetime. In particular, we compare two different definitions proposed in the literature for the entropy using a spatial averaging prescription. For one definition, the entropy of the large-scale structure for a given comoving volume always grows with time, both for a CDM and a $\Lambda$CDM model. In particular, while it diverges for a CDM model, it saturates to a constant value in the presence of a cosmological constant. The use of a light-cone averaging prescription in the context of the evaluation of the entropy is also discussed.
  • The standard cosmological model does not determine the spatial topology of the universe. This article revisits the signature of a non-trivial topology on the properties of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We show that the correlation function of the coefficients of the expansion of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in spherical harmonics, encodes a topological signature that can be used to distinguish a multi-connected space from an infinite space on sizes larger than the last scattering surface. The effect of the instrumental noise and of a galactic cut are estimated. We thus establish boundaries for the size of the biggest torus dintinguisable with temperature and polarization CMB data. We also describe the imprint of the spatial topology on the 3-point function and on non-Gaussianity.
  • This article proposes a comprehensive analysis of light propagation in an anisotropic and spatially homogeneous Bianchi I universe. After recalling that null geodesics are easily determined in such a spacetime, we derive the expressions of the redshift and direction drifts of light sources; by solving analytically the Sachs equation, we then obtain an explicit expression of the Jacobi matrix describing the propagation of narrow light beams. As a byproduct, we recover the old formula by Saunders for the angular diameter distance in a Bianchi I spacetime, but our derivation goes further since it also provides the optical shear and rotation. These results pave the way to the analysis of both supernovae data and weak lensing by the large-scale structure in Bianchi universes.
  • Various extensions of standard inflationary models have been proposed recently by adding vector fields. Because they are generally motivated by large-scale anomalies, and the possibility of statistical anisotropy of primordial fluctuations, such models require to introduce non-standard couplings between vector fields on the one hand, and either gravity or scalar fields on the other hand. In this article, we study models involving a vector field coupled to a scalar field. We derive restrictive necessary conditions for these models to be both stable (Hamiltonian bounded by below) and causal (hyperbolic equations of motion).
  • Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historical strong evidences for the big bang model. The recent results by the Planck satellite mission have slightly changed the estimate of the baryonic density compared to the previous WMAP analysis. This article updates the BBN predictions for the light elements using the cosmological parameters determined by Planck, as well as an improvement of the nuclear network and new spectroscopic observations. There is a slight lowering of the primordial Li/H abundance, however, this lithium value still remains typically 3 times larger than its observed spectroscopic abundance in halo stars of the Galaxy. According to the importance of this "lithium problem", we trace the small changes in its BBN calculated abundance following updates of the baryonic density, neutron lifetime and networks. In addition, for the first time, we provide confidence limits for the production of 6Li, 9Be, 11B and CNO, resulting from our extensive Monte Carlo calculation with our extended network. A specific focus is cast on CNO primordial production. Considering uncertainties on the nuclear rates around the CNO formation, we obtain CNO/H \approx (5-30) x 10^{-15}. We further improve this estimate by analyzing correlations between yields and reaction rates and identified new influential reaction rates. These uncertain rates, if simultaneously varied could lead to a significant increase of CNO production: CNO/H \sim 10^{-13}. This result is important for the study of population III star formation during the dark ages.
  • This article investigates the construction of fermions and the formulation of the Standard Model of particle physics in a theory in which the Lorentz signature emerges from an underlying microscopic purely Euclidean $SO(4)$ theory. Couplings to a clock field are responsible for triggering the change of signature of the effective metric in which the standard fields propagate. We demonstrate that Weyl and Majorana fermions can be constructed in this framework. This construction differs from other studies of Euclidean fermions, as the coupling to the clock field allows us to write down an action which flows to the usual action in Minkowski spacetime. We then show how the Standard Model can be obtained in this theory and consider the constraints on non-Standard-Model operators which can appear in the QED sector due to CPT and Lorentz violation.