• Most Type I superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) reported to date have been identified by their high peak luminosities and spectra lacking obvious signs of hydrogen. We demonstrate that these events can be distinguished from normal-luminosity SNe (including Type Ic events) solely from their spectra over a wide range of light-curve phases. We use this distinction to select 19 SLSNe-I and 4 possible SLSNe-I from the Palomar Transient Factory archive (including 7 previously published objects). We present 127 new spectra of these objects and combine these with 39 previously published spectra, and we use these to discuss the average spectral properties of SLSNe-I at different spectral phases. We find that Mn II most probably contributes to the ultraviolet spectral features after maximum light, and we give a detailed study of the O II features that often characterize the early-time optical spectra of SLSNe-I. We discuss the velocity distribution of O II, finding that for some SLSNe-I this can be confined to a narrow range compared to relatively large systematic velocity shifts. Mg II and Fe II favor higher velocities than O II and C II, and we briefly discuss how this may constrain power-source models. We tentatively group objects by how well they match either SN 2011ke or PTF12dam and discuss the possibility that physically distinct events may have been previously grouped together under the SLSN-I label.
  • We present the Deeper Wider Faster (DWF) program that coordinates more than 30 multi-wavelength and multi-messenger facilities worldwide and in space to detect and study fast transients (millisecond-to-hours duration). DWF has four main components, (1) simultaneous observations, where about 10 major facilities, from radio to gamma-ray, are coordinated to perform deep, wide-field, fast-cadenced observations of the same field at the same time. Radio telescopes search for fast radio bursts while optical imagers and high-energy instruments search for seconds-to-hours timescale transient events, (2) real-time (seconds to minutes) supercomputer data processing and candidate identification, along with real-time (minutes) human inspection of candidates using sophisticated visualisation technology, (3) rapid-response (minutes) follow-up spectroscopy and imaging and conventional ToO observations, and (4) long-term follow up with a global network of 1-4m-class telescopes. The principal goals of DWF are to discover and study counterparts to fast radio bursts and gravitational wave events, along with millisecond-to-hour duration transients at all wavelengths.
  • We report our first discoveries of high-redshift supernovae from the Subaru HIgh-Z sUpernova CAmpaign (SHIZUCA), a transient survey using Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. We report the discovery of three supernovae at spectroscopically-confirmed redshifts of 2.399 (HSC16adga), 1.965 (HSC17auzg), and 1.851 (HSC17dbpf), and two supernova candidates with host-galaxy photometric redshifts of 3.2 (HSC16apuo) and 4.2 (HSC17dsid), respectively. In this paper, we present their photometric properties and the spectroscopic properties of the confirmed high-redshift supernovae are presented in the accompanying paper Curtin et al. (2018). The supernovae with the confirmed redshifts of z ~ 2 have rest ultraviolet peak magnitudes of around -21 mag, which make them superluminous supernovae. The discovery of three supernovae at z ~ 2 roughly corresponds to an event rate of ~ 900 Gpc-3 yr-1, which is already consistent with the total superluminous supernova rate estimated by extrapolating the local rate based on the cosmic star-formation history. Adding unconfirmed superluminous supernova candidates would increase the event rate. Our superluminous supernova candidates at the redshifts of around 3 and 4 indicate minimum superluminous supernova rates of ~ 400 Gpc-3 yr-1 (z ~ 3) and ~ 500 Gpc-3 yr-1 (z ~ 4). Because we have only performed a pilot search for high-redshift supernovae so far and have not completed selecting all the high-redshift supernova candidates, these rates are lower limits. Our initial results demonstrate the amazing capability of Hyper Suprime-Cam to discover high-redshift supernovae.
  • We present Keck spectroscopic confirmation of three superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z = 1.851, 1.965 and 2.399 detected as part of the Subaru HIgh-Z sUpernova CAmpaign (SHIZUCA). The host galaxies have multi-band photometric redshifts consistent with the spectroscopic values. The supernovae were detected during their rise, allowing the spectra to be taken near maximum light. The restframe far-ultraviolet (FUV; ~1000--2500A) spectra are made up in flux of approximately equal parts supernova and host galaxy. Weather conditions during observations were not ideal, and while the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra are sufficient for redshift confirmation, the type of each event remains ambiguous. We compare our spectra to the few low redshift SLSN FUV spectra available to date and offer an interpretation as to the type of each supernova. We prefer SLSN-II classifications for all three events. The success of the first SHIZUCA Keck spectroscopic follow-up program is encouraging. It demonstrates that campaigns such as SHIZUCA are capable of identifying high redshift SLSNe with sufficient accuracy, speed and depth for rapid, well-cadenced and informative follow-up.
  • We report on SALT low resolution optical spectroscopy and optical/IR photometry undertaken with other SAAO telescopes (MASTER-SAAO and IRSF) of the kilonova AT 2017gfo (aka SSS17a) in the galaxy NGC4993 during the first 10 days of discovery. This event has been identified as the first ever electromagnetic counterpart of a gravitational wave event, namely GW170817, which was detected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories. The event is likely due to a merger of two neutron stars, resulting in a kilonova explosion. SALT was the third telescope to obtain spectroscopy of AT 2017gfo and the first spectrum, 1.2 d after the merger, is quite blue and shows some broad features, but no identifiable spectral lines and becomes redder over time. We compare the spectral and photometric evolution with recent kilonova simulations and conclude that they are in qualitative agreement for post-merger wind models with proton: nucleon ratios of $Y_e$ = 0.25$-$0.30. The blue colour of the first spectrum is consistent with the lower opacity of the Lathanide-free r-process elements in the ejecta. Differences between the models and observations are likely due to the choice of system parameters combined with the absence of atomic data for more elements in the ejecta models.
  • The ability to quickly detect transient sources in optical images and trigger multi-wavelength follow up is key for the discovery of fast transients. These include events rare and difficult to detect such as kilonovae, supernova shock breakout, and "orphan" Gamma-ray Burst afterglows. We present the Mary pipeline, a (mostly) automated tool to discover transients during high-cadenced observations with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at CTIO. The observations are part of the "Deeper Wider Faster" program, a multi-facility, multi-wavelength program designed to discover fast transients, including counterparts to Fast Radio Bursts and gravitational waves. Our tests of the Mary pipeline on DECam images return a false positive rate of ~2.2% and a missed fraction of ~3.4% obtained in less than 2 minutes, which proves the pipeline to be suitable for rapid and high-quality transient searches. The pipeline can be adapted to search for transients in data obtained with imagers other than DECam.
  • An interesting transient has been detected in one of our three Dark Energy Camera deep fields. Observations of these deep fields take advantage of the high red sensitivity of DECam on the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory Blanco telescope. The survey includes the Y band with rest wavelength 1430{\AA} at z = 6. Survey fields (the Prime field 0555-6130, the 16hr field 1600-75 and the SUDSS New Southern Field) are deeper in Y than other infrared surveys. They are circumpolar, allowing all night to be used efficiently, exploiting the moon tolerance of 1 micron observations to minimize conflict with the Dark Energy Survey. As an i-band dropout (meaning that the flux decrement shortward of Lyman alpha is in the i bandpass), the transient we report here is a supernova candidate with z ~ 6, with a luminosity comparable to the brightest known current epoch superluminous supernova (i.e., ~ 2 x 10^11 solar luminosities).
  • By applying a display ecology to the {\em Deeper, Wider, Faster} proactive, simultaneous telescope observing campaign, we have shown a dramatic reduction in the time taken to inspect DECam CCD images for potential transient candidates and to produce time-critical triggers to standby telescopes. We also show how facilitating rapid corroboration of potential candidates and the exclusion of non-candidates improves the accuracy of detection; and establish that a practical and enjoyable workspace can improve the experience of an otherwise taxing task for astronomers. We provide a critical road-test of two advanced displays in a research context -- a rare opportunity to demonstrate how they can be used rather than simply discuss how they might be used to accelerate discovery.
  • Superluminous supernovae are beginning to be discovered at redshifts as early as the epoch of reionization. A number of candidate mechanisms is reviewed, together with the discovery programs.
  • We present and discuss ultraviolet and optical photometry from the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope and X-ray limits from the X-Ray Telescope on Swift and imaging polarimetry and ultraviolet/optical spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope of ASASSN-15lh. It has been classified as a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN I) more luminous than any other supernova observed. ASASSN-15lh is not detected in the X-rays in individual or coadded observations. From the polarimetry we determine that the explosion was only mildly asymmetric. We find the flux of ASASSN-15lh to increase strongly into the ultraviolet, with a ultraviolet luminosity a hundred times greater than the hydrogen-rich, ultraviolet-bright SLSN II SN 2008es. We find objects as bright as ASASSN-15lh are easily detectable beyond redshifts of ~4 with the single-visit depths planned for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Deep near-infrared surveys could detect such objects past a redshift of ~20 enabling a probe of the earliest star formation. A late rebrightening -- most prominent at shorter wavelengths -- is seen about two months after the peak brightness, which is itself as bright as a superluminous supernova. The ultraviolet spectra during the rebrightening are dominated by the continuum without the broad absorption or emission lines seen in SLSNe or tidal disruption events and the early optical spectra of ASASSN-15lh. Our spectra show no strong hydrogen emission, showing only LyA absorption near the redshift previously found by optical absorption lines of the presumed host. The properties of ASASSN-15lh are extreme when compared to either SLSNe or tidal disruption events.
  • The high Antarctic plateau provides exceptional conditions for conducting infrared observations of the cosmos on account of the cold, dry and stable atmosphere above the ice surface. This paper describes the scientific goals behind the first program to examine the time-varying universe in the infrared from Antarctica - the Kunlun Infrared Sky Survey (KISS). This will employ a small (50 cm aperture) telescope to monitor the southern skies in the 2.4um Kdark window from China's Kunlun station at Dome A, on the summit of the Antarctic plateau, through the uninterrupted 4-month period of winter darkness. An earlier paper discussed optimisation of the Kdark filter for the best sensitivity (Li et al 2016). This paper examines the scientific program for KISS. We calculate the sensitivity of the camera for the extrema of observing conditions that will be encountered. We present the parameters for sample surveys that could then be carried out for a range of cadences and sensitivities. We then discuss several science programs that could be conducted with these capabilities, involving star formation, brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters, exoplanets around M dwarfs, the terminal phases of stellar evolution, discovering fast transients as part of multi-wavelength campaigns, embedded supernova searches, reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and the detection of the cosmic infrared background. Accepted for publication in PASA, 04/08/16.
  • The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) will complete its preliminary design phase in 2016. The IRIS instrument design includes a near-infrared (0.85 - 2.4 micron) integral field spectrograph (IFS) and imager that are able to conduct simultaneous diffraction-limited observations behind the advanced adaptive optics system NFIRAOS. The IRIS science cases have continued to be developed and new science studies have been investigated to aid in technical performance and design requirements. In this development phase, the IRIS science team has paid particular attention to the selection of filters, gratings, sensitivities of the entire system, and science cases that will benefit from the parallel mode of the IFS and imaging camera. We present new science cases for IRIS using the latest end-to-end data simulator on the following topics: Solar System bodies, the Galactic center, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and distant gravitationally-lensed galaxies. We then briefly discuss the necessity of an advanced data management system and data reduction pipeline.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • The formation and evolution of galaxies require large reservoirs of cold, neutral gas. The damped Lya systems (DLAs), seen in absorption towards distant quasars and gamma-ray bursts, are predicted to be the dominant reservoirs for this gas. Detailed properties of DLAs have been studied extensively for decades with great success. However, their size, fundamental in understanding their nature, has remained elusive, as quasar and gamma-ray-burst sightlines only probe comparatively tiny areas of the foreground DLAs. Here, we introduce a new approach to measure the full extent of DLAs in the sightlines toward extended background sources. We present the discovery of a high-column-density (log N(HI) = 21.1 +/-0.4 cm^-2) DLA at z ~ 2.4 covering 90-100% of the luminous extent of a line-of-sight background galaxy. Estimates of the size of the background galaxy range from a minimum of a few kpc^2, to ~100 kpc^2, and demonstrate that high-column density neutral gas can span continuous areas 10^8 - 10^10 times larger than previously explored in quasar or gamma-ray burst sightlines. The DLA presented here is the first from a sample of DLAs in our pilot survey that searches Lyman break and Lyman continuum galaxies at high redshift. The low luminosities, large sizes, and mass contents (>~10^6 - 10^9 M_solar) implied by this DLA and the early data suggest that DLAs contain the necessary fuel for galaxies, with many systems consistent with relatively massive, low-luminosity primeval galaxies.
  • The flow of baryons to and from a galaxy, which is fundamental for galaxy formation and evolution, can be studied with galaxy-metal absorption system pairs. Our search for galaxies around CIV absorption systems at $z\sim5.7$ showed an excess of photometric Lyman-$\alpha$ emitter (LAE) candidates in the fields J1030+0524 and J1137+3549. Here we present spectroscopic follow-up of 33 LAEs in both fields. In the first field, three out of the five LAEs within 10$h^{{-}1}$ projected comoving Mpc from the CIV system are within $\pm500$ km s$^{{-}1}$ from the absorption at $z_{\text{CIV}}=5.7242\pm0.0001$. The closest candidate (LAE 103027+052419) is robustly confirmed at $212.8^{+14}_{-0.4}h^{-1}$ physical kpc from the CIV system. In the second field, the LAE sample is selected at a lower redshift ($\Delta z\sim0.04$) than the CIV absorption system as a result of the filter transmission and, thus, do not trace its environment. The observed properties of LAE 103027+052419 indicate that it is near the high-mass end of the LAE distribution, probably having a large HI column density and large-scale outflows. Therefore, our results suggest that the CIV system is likely produced by a star-forming galaxy which has been injecting metals into the intergalactic medium since $z>6$. Thus, the CIV system is either produced by LAE 103027+052419, implying that outflows can enrich larger volumes at $z>6$ than at $z\sim3.5$, or an undetected dwarf galaxy. In either case, CIV systems like this one trace the ionized intergalactic medium at the end of cosmic hydrogen reionization and may trace the sources of the ionizing flux density.
  • We performed a detailed study of the extended cool gas, traced by MgII absorption [$W_r(2796)\geq0.3$~{\AA}], surrounding 14 narrow-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 0.12<z<0.22 using background quasar sight-lines. The background quasars probe the AGNs at projected distances of $60\leq D\leq265$~kpc. We find that, between $100\leq D\leq200$~kpc, AGNs appear to have lower MgII gas covering fractions (0.09$^{+0.18}_{-0.08}$) than quasars (0.47$^{+0.16}_{-0.15}$) and possibly lower than in active field galaxies (0.25$^{+0.11}_{-0.09}$). We do not find a statistically significant azimuthal angle dependence for the MgII covering fraction around AGNs, though the data hint at one. We also study the `down-the-barrel' outflow properties of the AGNs themselves and detect intrinsic NaID absorption in 8/8 systems and intrinsic MgII absorption in 2/2 systems, demonstrating that the AGNs have significant reservoirs of cool gas. We find that 6/8 NaID and 2/2 MgII intrinsic systems contain blueshifted absorption with $\Delta v>50$ km/s, indicating outflowing gas. The 2/2 intrinsic MgII systems have outflow velocities a factor of $\sim4$ higher than the NaID outflow velocities. Our results are consistent with AGN-driven outflows destroying the cool gas within their halos, which dramatically decreases their cool gas covering fraction, while star-burst driven winds are expelling cool gas into their circumgalactic media (CGM). This picture appears contrary to quasar--quasar pair studies which show that the quasar CGM contains significant amounts of cool gas whereas intrinsic gas found `down-the-barrel' of quasars reveals no cool gas. We discuss how these results are complementary and provide support for the AGN unified model.
  • We present the first observation of a galaxy (z=0.2) that exhibits metal-line absorption back-illuminated by the galaxy ("down-the-barrel") and transversely by a background quasar at a projected distance of 58 kpc. Both absorption systems, traced by MgII, are blueshifted relative to the galaxy systemic velocity. The quasar sight-line, which resides almost directly along the projected minor axis of the galaxy, probes MgI and MgII absorption obtained from Keck/LRIS and Lya, SiII and SiIII absorption obtained from HST/COS. For the first time, we combine two independent models used to quantify the outflow properties for down-the-barrel and transverse absorption. We find that the modeled down-the-barrel deprojected outflow velocities range between $V_{dtb}=45-255$ km/s. The transverse bi-conical outflow model, assuming constant-velocity flows perpendicular to the disk, requires wind velocities $V_{outflow}=40-80$ km/s to reproduce the transverse MgII absorption kinematics, which is consistent with the range of $V_{dtb}$. The galaxy has a metallicity, derived from H$\alpha$ and NII, of $[{\rm O/H}]=-0.21\pm0.08$, whereas the transverse absorption has $[{\rm X/H}]=-1.12\pm0.02$. The galaxy star-formation rate is constrained between $4.6-15$ M$_{\odot}$/yr while the estimated outflow rate ranges between $1.6-4.2$ M$_{\odot}$/yr and yields a wind loading factor ranging between $0.1-0.9$. The galaxy and gas metallicities, the galaxy-quasar sight-line geometry, and the down-the-barrel and transverse modeled outflow velocities collectively suggest that the transverse gas originates from ongoing outflowing material from the galaxy. The $\sim$1 dex decrease in metallicity from the base of the outflow to the outer halo suggests metal dilution of the gas by the time it reached 58 kpc.
  • Metal absorption systems are products of star formation. They are believed to be associated with massive star forming galaxies, which have significantly enriched their surroundings. To test this idea with high column density CIV absorption systems at z~5.7, we study the projected distribution of galaxies and characterise the environment of CIV systems in two independent quasar lines-of-sight: J103027.01+052455.0 and J113717.73+354956.9. Using wide field photometry (~80x60h$^{-1}$ comoving Mpc), we select bright (Muv(1350\AA)<-21.0 mag.) Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z~5.7 in a redshift slice \Delta z~0.2 and we compare their projected distribution with z~5.7 narrow-band selected Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs, \Delta z~0.08). We find that the CIV systems are located more than 10h$^{-1}$ projected comoving Mpc from the main concentrations of LBGs and no candidate is closer than ~5h$^{-1}$ projected comoving Mpc. In contrast, an excess of LAEs -lower mass galaxies- is found on scales of ~10h$^{-1}$ comoving Mpc, suggesting that LAEs are the primary candidates for the source of the CIV systems. Furthermore, the closest object to the system in the field J1030+0524 is a faint LAE at a projected distance of 212h$^{-1}$ physical kpc. However, this work cannot rule out undiscovered lower mass galaxies as the origin of these absorption systems. We conclude that, in contrast with lower redshift examples (z<3.5), strong CIV absorption systems at z~5.7 trace low-to-intermediate density environments dominated by low-mass galaxies. Moreover, the excess of LAEs associated with high levels of ionizing flux agrees with the idea that faint galaxies dominate the ionizing photon budget at this redshift.
  • Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3-4 are targeted to measure the fraction of Lyman continuum (LyC) flux that escapes from high redshift galaxies. However, z ~ 3-4 LBGs are identified using the Lyman break technique which preferentially selects galaxies with little or no LyC. We re-examine the standard LBG selection criteria by performing spectrophotometry on composite spectra constructed from 794 U_nGR-selected z ~ 3 LBGs from the literature while adding LyC flux of varying strengths. The modified composite spectra accurately predict the range of redshifts, properties, and LyC flux of LBGs in the literature that have spectroscopic LyC measurements while predicting the existence of a significant fraction of galaxies outside the standard selection region. These galaxies, termed Lyman continuum galaxies (LCGs), are expected to have high levels of LyC flux and are estimated to have a number density ~30-50 percent that of the LBG population. We define R_obs(U_n) as the relative fraction of observed LyC flux, integrated from 912A to the shortest restframe wavelength probed by the U_n filter, to the observed non-ionising flux (here measured at 1500A). We use the 794 spectra as a statistical sample for the full z ~ 3 LBG population, and find R_obs(U_n) = 5.0 +1.0/-0.4 (4.1 +0.5/-0.3) percent, which corresponds to an intrinsic LyC escape fraction of f_esc = 10.5 +2.0/-0.8 (8.6 +1.0/-0.6) percent (contamination corrected). From the composite spectral distributions we estimate R_obs(U_n) ~16 +/-3, f_esc ~33 +/-7 percent for LCGs and R_obs(U_n) ~8 +/-3, f_esc ~16 +/-4 percent for the combined LBG + LCG z ~ 3 sample. All values are measured in apertures defined by the UV continuum and do not include extended and/or offset LyC flux. A complete high redshift galaxy census and total emergent LyC flux is essential to quantify the contribution of galaxies to the epoch of reionisation.
  • Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopic observations of the nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN2011fe, taken on 10 epochs from -13.1 to +40.8 days relative to B-band maximum light, and spanning the far-ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared (IR) are presented. This spectroscopic coverage makes SN2011fe the best-studied local SN Ia to date. SN2011fe is a typical moderately-luminous SN Ia with no evidence for dust extinction. Its near-UV spectral properties are representative of a larger sample of local events (Maguire et al. 2012). The near-UV to optical spectra of SN2011fe are modelled with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code using the technique of 'abundance tomography', constraining the density structure and the abundance stratification in the SN ejecta. SN2011fe was a relatively weak explosion, with moderate Fe-group yields. The density structures of the classical model W7 and of a delayed detonation model were tested. Both have shortcomings. An ad-hoc density distribution was developed which yields improved fits and is characterised by a high-velocity tail, which is absent in W7. However, this tail contains less mass than delayed detonation models. This improved model has a lower energy than one-dimensional explosion models matching typical SNe Ia (e.g. W7, WDD1). The derived Fe abundance in the outermost layer is consistent with the metallicity at the SN explosion site in M101 (~0.5 Zsolar). The spectroscopic rise time (~19 days) is significantly longer than that measured from the early optical light curve, implying a 'dark phase' of ~1 day. A longer rise time has significant implications when deducing the properties of the white dwarf and binary system from the early photometric behaviour.
  • We report the first measurements of MgII absorption systems associated with spectroscopically confirmed z~0.1 star-forming galaxies at projected distances of D<6kpc. We demonstrate the data are consistent with the well known anti-correlation between rest-frame MgII equivalent width, Wr(2796), and impact parameter, D, represented by a single log-linear relation derived by Nielsen et al. (MAGIICAT) that converges to ~2A at D=0kpc. Incorporating MAGIICAT, we find that the halo gas covering fraction is unity below D~25kpc. We also report that our D<6kpc absorbers are consistent with the Wr(2796) distributions of the Milky Way interstellar medium (ISM) and ISM+halo. In addition, quasar sight-lines of intermediate redshift galaxies with 6<D<25kpc have an equivalent width distribution similar to that of the Milky Way halo, implying that beyond ~6kpc, quasar sight-lines are likely probing halo gas and not the ISM. As inferred by the Milky Way and our new data, the gas profiles of galaxies can be fit by a single log-linear Wr(2796)-D relation out to large scales across a variety of gas-phase conditions and is maintained through the halo/extra-planar/ISM interfaces, which is remarkable considering their kinematic complexity. These low redshift, small impact parameter absorption systems are the first steps to bridge the gap between quasar absorption-line studies and HI observations of the CGM.
  • We examine the effects of magnitude, colour, and Ly-alpha equivalent width (EW) on the spatial distribution of z~3 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and report significant differences in their auto-correlation functions (ACFs). The results are obtained using samples of ~10,000-57,000 LBGs from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. We find that magnitude has a larger effect on the ACF amplitude on small scales (<~1 Mpc) and that colour is more influential on large scales (>~1 Mpc). We find the most significant differences between ACFs for LBGs with dominant net Ly-alpha EW in absorption (aLBGs) and dominant net Ly-alpha EW in emission (eLBGs) determined from >~95% pure samples of each population using a photometric technique calibrated from ~1000 spectra. The aLBG ACF one-halo term departs from a power law fit near ~1 Mpc, corresponding to the virial radii of M_DM ~10^13 M_solar haloes, and shows a strong two-halo term amplitude. In contrast, the eLBG ACF one-halo term departs at ~0.12 Mpc, suggesting parent haloes of M_DM ~10^11 M_solar, and a two-halo term that exhibits a `hump' on intermediate scales that we localize to the faintest, bluest members. We find that the `hump' can be well fit with a model in which a significant fraction of eLBGs reside on shells. The auto- and cross-correlation functions indicate that aLBGs are found in massive, group-like haloes and that eLBGs are found largely on group outskirts and in the field. Ly-alpha is a tracer of several intrinsic LBG properties, including morphology, implying that the mechanisms behind the morphology-density relation are in place at z~3 and that Ly-alpha EW may be a key environment diagnostic. Finally, our results show that the mass of LBGs has been underestimated because the LBG ACF amplitude is lower than the true average as a result of the spatial anti-correlation of the spectral sub-types (abridged).
  • The detection of Pop III supernovae could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time, unveiling the properties of the first galaxies, early chemical enrichment and reionization, and the seeds of supermassive black holes. Growing evidence that some Pop III stars were less massive than 100 solar masses may complicate prospects for their detection, because even though they would have been more plentiful they would have died as core-collapse supernovae, with far less luminosity than pair-instability explosions. This picture greatly improves if the SN shock collides with a dense circumstellar shell ejected during a prior violent LBV type eruption. Such collisions can turn even dim SNe into extremely bright ones whose luminosities can rival those of pair-instability SNe. We present simulations of Pop III Type IIn SN light curves and spectra performed with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. Taking into account Lyman-alpha absorption in the early universe and cosmological redshifting, we find that 40 solar mass Pop III Type IIn SNe will be visible out to z ~ 20 with JWST and out to z ~ 7 with WFIRST. Thus, even low mass Pop III SNe can be used to probe the primeval universe.
  • A rare class of `super-luminous' supernovae that are about ten or more times more luminous at their peaks than other types of luminous supernovae has recently been found at low to intermediate redshifts. A small subset of these events have luminosities that evolve slowly and result in radiated energies of around 10^51 ergs or more. Therefore, they are likely examples of `pair-instability' or `pulsational pair-instability' supernovae with estimated progenitor masses of 100 - 250 times that of the Sun. These events are exceedingly rare at low redshift, but are expected to be more common at high redshift because the mass distribution of the earliest stars was probably skewed to high values. Here we report the detection of two super-luminous supernovae, at redshifts of 2.05 and 3.90, that have slowly evolving light curves. We estimate the rate of events at redshifts of 2 and 4 to be approximately ten times higher than the rate at low redshift. The extreme luminosities of super-luminous supernovae extend the redshift limit for supernova detection using present technology, previously 2.36, and provide a way of investigating the deaths of the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang.
  • We use a sample of z~3 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) to examine close pair clustering statistics in comparison to LCDM-based models of structure formation. Samples are selected by matching the LBG number density and by matching the observed LBG 3-D correlation function of LBGs over the two-halo term region. We show that UV-luminosity abundance matching cannot reproduce the observed data, but if subhalos are chosen to reproduce the observed clustering of LBGs we are able to reproduce the observed LBG pair fraction, (Nc), defined as the average number of companions per galaxy. This model suggests an over abundance of LBGs by a factor of ~5 over those observed, suggesting that only 1 in 5 halos above a fixed mass hosts a galaxy with LBG-like UV luminosity detectable via LBG selection techniques. We find a total observable close pair fraction of 23 \pm 0.6% (17.7 \pm 0.5%) using a prototypical cylinder radius in our overdense fiducial model and 8.3 \pm 0.5% (5.6 \pm 0.2%) in an abundance matched model (impurity corrected). For the matched spectroscopic slit analysis, we find Ncs = 5.1\pm0.2% (1.68\pm0.02%), the average number of companions observed serendipitously in our for fiducial slits (abundance matched), whereas the observed fraction of serendipitous spectroscopic close pairs is 4.7\pm1.5 per cent using the full LBG sample and 7.1\pm2.3% for a subsample with higher signal-to-noise ratio. We show that the standard method of halo assignment fails to reproduce the break in the LBG close pair behavior at small scale. To reconcile these discrepancies we suggest that a plausible fraction of LBGs in close pairs with lower mass than our sample experience interaction-induced enhanced star formation that boosts their luminosity sufficiently to be detected in observational sample but are not included in the abundance matched simulation sample.