• We present a search for companion [CII] emitters to known luminous sources at $6<$ z $<6.5$ in deep, archival ALMA observations. The observations are deep enough to detect sources with L$_{\rm [CII]} \sim 10^8$ at z $\sim6$. We identify four robust line detections from a blind search of five deep fields centered on ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and QSOs, over an order of magnitude more than expected based on current observations and predictions, suggesting that these objects may be highly biased tracers of mass in the early Universe. We find these companion lines to have comparable properties to other known galaxies at the same epoch. All companions lie less than 650 km s$^{-1}$ and between 20 -- 70 kpc (projected) from their central source, providing a constraint on their halo masses of the central galaxies ranging from 2.5$\times$10$^{12}$ M$_\odot$ to 4$\times$10$^{13}$ M$_\odot$. To place these discoveries in context, we employ a mock galaxy catalog to estimate the luminosity function for [CII] during reionization and compare to our observations. The simulations support this result by showing a similar level of elevated counts found around such luminous sources.
  • We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the dust continuum and [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line emission towards a far-infrared-luminous quasar, ULAS J131911.29$+$095051.4 at $z=6.13$, and combine the new Cycle 1 data with ALMA Cycle 0 data. The combined data have an angular resolution $\sim$ $0.3$, and resolve both the dust continuum and the [C II] line emission on few kpc scales. The [C II] line emission is more irregular than the dust continuum emission which suggests different distributions between the dust and [C II]-emitting gas. The combined data confirm the [C II] velocity gradient that we previously detected in lower resolution ALMA image from Cycle 0 data alone. We apply a tilted ring model to the [C II] velocity map to obtain a rotation curve, and constrain the circular velocity to be 427 $\pm$ 55 km s$^{-1}$ at a radius of 3.2 kpc with an inclination angle of 34$^\circ$. We measure the dynamical mass within the 3.2 kpc region to be 13.4$_{-5.3}^{+7.8}$ $\times 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. This yields a black hole and host galaxy mass ratio of 0.020$_{-0.007}^{+0.013}$, which is about 4$_{-2}^{+3}$ times higher than the present-day $M_{\rm BH}$/$M_{\rm bulge}$ ratio. This suggests that the supermassive black hole grows the bulk of its mass before the formation of the most of stellar mass in this quasar host galaxy in the early universe.
  • We present the results of ALMA spectroscopic follow-up of a $z=6.765$ Lyman-$\alpha$ emitting galaxy behind the cluster RXJ1347-1145. We report the detection of [CII]158$\mu$m line fully consistent with the Lyman-$\alpha$ redshift and with the peak of the optical emission. Given the magnification of $\mu=5.0 \pm 0.3$ the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) luminosity of the [CII] line is $L_{[CII]} =1.4^{+0.2}_{-0.3} \times 10^7L_{\odot}$, which is ${\sim}5$ times fainter than other detections of $z\sim 7$ galaxies. The result indicates that low $L_{[CII]}$ in $z\sim 7$ galaxies compared to the local counterparts might be caused by their low metallicities and/or feedback. The small velocity off-set ($\Delta v = 20_{-40}^{+140} \rm km/s$) between the Lyman-$\alpha$ and [CII] line is unusual, and may be indicative of ionizing photons escaping.
  • We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSSJ010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z=6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH) of 1.24x10^10 Msun known at z>6. We detect the [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353 GHz, 260 GHz, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ~1000 km/s from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides direct constraint on the molecular gas mass which is about (1.0+/-0.3)x10^10 Msun. We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/-0.7)x10^12 Lsun, and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010+/-0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z~6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C II] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH-galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We make use of deep 1.2mm-continuum observations (12.7microJy/beam RMS) of a 1 arcmin^2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to probe dust-enshrouded star formation from 330 Lyman-break galaxies spanning the redshift range z=2-10 (to ~2-3 Msol/yr at 1sigma over the entire range). Given the depth and area of ASPECS, we would expect to tentatively detect 35 galaxies extrapolating the Meurer z~0 IRX-beta relation to z>~2 (assuming T_d~35 K). However, only 6 tentative detections are found at z>~2 in ASPECS, with just three at >3sigma. Subdividing z=2-10 galaxies according to stellar mass, UV luminosity, and UV-continuum slope and stacking the results, we only find a significant detection in the most massive (>10^9.75 Msol) subsample, with an infrared excess (IRX=L_{IR}/L_{UV}) consistent with previous z~2 results. However, the infrared excess we measure from our large selection of sub-L* (<10^9.75 Msol) galaxies is 0.11(-0.42)(+0.32) and 0.14(-0.14)(+0.15) at z=2-3 and z=4-10, respectively, lying below even an SMC IRX-beta relation (95% confidence). These results demonstrate the relevance of stellar mass for predicting the IR luminosity of z>~2 galaxies. We furthermore find that the evolution of the IRX-stellar mass relationship depends on the evolution of the dust temperature. If the dust temperature increases monotonically with redshift (as (1+z)^0.32) such that T_d~44-50 K at z>=4, current results are suggestive of little evolution in this relationship to z~6. We use these results to revisit recent estimates of the z>~3 SFR density. One less obvious implication is in interpreting the high Halpha EWs seen in z~5 galaxies: our results imply that star-forming galaxies produce Lyman-continuum photons at twice the efficiency (per unit UV luminosity) as implied in conventional models. Star-forming galaxies can then reionize the Universe, even if the escape fraction is <10%.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • We present CO(1-0) observations obtained at the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for 14 z~2 galaxies with existing CO(3-2) measurements, including 11 galaxies which contain active galactic nuclei (AGN) and three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We combine this sample with an additional 15 z~2 galaxies from the literature that have both CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) measurements in order to evaluate differences in CO excitation between SMGs and AGN host galaxies, measure the effects of CO excitation on the derived molecular gas properties of these populations, and to look for correlations between the molecular gas excitation and other physical parameters. With our expanded sample of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) line ratio measurements, we do not find a statistically significant difference in the mean line ratio between SMGs and AGN host galaxies as found in the literature, instead finding r_3,1=1.03+/-0.50 for AGN host galaxies and r_3,1=0.78+/-0.27 for SMGs (or r_3,1=0.90+/-0.40 for both populations combined). We also do not measure a statistically significant difference between the distributions of the line ratios for these populations at the p=0.05 level, although this result is less robust. We find no excitation dependence on the index or offset of the integrated Schmidt-Kennicutt relation for the two CO lines, and obtain indices consistent with N=1 for the various sub-populations. However, including low-z "normal" galaxies increases our best-fit Schmidt-Kennicutt index to N~1.2. While we do not reproduce correlations between the CO line width and luminosity, we do reproduce correlations between CO excitation and star formation efficiency.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO ($J = 2 \rightarrow 1$) line emission towards the $z = 6.419$ quasar SDSS J$114816.64+525150.3$ (J$1148+5251$). The molecular gas is found to be marginally resolved with a major axis of $0.9"$ (consistent with previous size measurements of the CO ($J = 7 \rightarrow 6$) emission). We observe tentative evidence for extended line emission towards the south west on a scale of ~$1.4"$, but this is only detected at $3.3\sigma$ significance and should be confirmed. The position of the molecular emission region is in excellent agreement with previous detections of low frequency radio continuum emission as well as [C ii] line and thermal dust continuum emission. These CO ($J = 2 \rightarrow 1$) observations provide an anchor for the low excitation part of the molecular line SED. We find no evidence for extended low excitation component, neither in the spectral line energy distribution nor the image. We fit a single kinetic gas temperature model of 50 K. We revisit the gas and dynamical masses in light of this new detection of a low order transition of CO, and confirm previous findings that there is no extended reservoir of cold molecular gas in J$1148+5251$, and that the source departs substantially from the low $z$ relationship between black hole mass and bulge mass. Hence, the characteristics of J$1148+5251$ at $z = 6.419$ are very similar to $z$~$2$ quasars, in the lack of a diffuse cold gas reservoir and kpc-size compactness of the star forming region.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) detections of atomic carbon line and dust continuum emission in two UV-luminous galaxies at redshift 6. The far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of these galaxies are substantially lower than similar starbursts at later cosmic epochs, indicating an evolution in the dust properties with redshift, in agreement with the evolution seen in ultraviolet (UV) attenuation by dust. The [CII] to FIR ratios are found to be higher than at low redshift showing that [CII] should be readily detectable by ALMA within the reionization epoch. One of the two galaxies shows a complex merger nature with the less massive component dominating the UV emission and the more massive component dominating the FIR line and continuum. Using the interstellar atomic carbon line to derive the systemic redshifts we investigate the velocity of Lyman alpha emission emerging from high-z galaxies. In contrast to previous work, we find no evidence for decreasing Lyman alpha velocity shifts at high-redshift. We observe an increase in velocity shifts from z$\sim$2 to z$\sim$6, consistent with the effects of increased IGM absorption.
  • In this chapter, we highlight a number of science investigations that are enabled by the inclusion of Band~5 ($4.6-13.8$ GHz) for SKA1-MID science operations, while focusing on the astrophysics of star formation over cosmic time. For studying the detailed astrophysics of star formation at high-redshift, surveys at frequencies $\gtrsim$10 GHz have the distinct advantage over traditional $\sim$1.4 GHz surveys as they are able to yield higher angular resolution imaging while probing higher rest frame frequencies of galaxies with increasing redshift, where emission of star-forming galaxies becomes dominated by thermal (free-free) radiation. In doing so, surveys carried out at $\gtrsim$10 GHz provide a robust, dust-unbiased measurement of the massive star formation rate by being highly sensitive to the number of ionizing photons that are produced. To access this powerful star formation rate diagnostic requires that Band~5 be available for SKA1-MID. We additionally present a detailed science case for frequency coverage extending up to 30 GHz during full SKA2 operations, as this allows for highly diverse science while additionally providing contiguous frequency coverage between the SKA and ALMA, which will likely be the two most powerful interferometers for the coming decades. To enable this synergy, it is crucial that the dish design of the SKA be flexible enough to include the possibility of being fit with receivers operating up to 30 GHz.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [C II] 158 micron fine structure line and dust continuum emission from the host galaxies of five redshift 6 quasars. We also report complementary observations of 250 GHz dust continuum and CO (6-5) line emission from the z=6.00 quasar SDSS J231038.88+185519.7. The ALMA observations were carried out in the extended array at 0.7" resolution. We have detected the line and dust continuum in all five objects. The derived [C II] line luminosities are 1.6x10^{9} to 8.8x10^{9} Lsun and the [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratios are 3.0-5.6x10^{-4}, which is comparable to the values found in other high-redshift quasar-starburst systems and local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. The sources are marginally resolved and the intrinsic source sizes (major axis FWHM) are constrained to be 0.3" to 0.6" (i.e., 1.7 to 3.5 kpc) for the [C II] line emission and 0.2" to 0.4" (i.e., 1.2 to 2.3 kpc) for the continuum. These measurements indicate that there is vigorous star formation over the central few kpc in the quasar host galaxies. The ALMA observations also constrain the dynamical properties of the atomic gas in the starburst nuclei. The intensity-weighted velocity maps of three sources show clear velocity gradients. Such velocity gradients are consistent with a rotating, gravitationally bound gas component, although they are not uniquely interpreted as such. Under the simplifying assumption of rotation, the implied dynamical masses within the [C II]-emitting regions are of order 10^{10} to 10^{11} Msun. Given these estimates, the mass ratios between the SMBHs and the spheroidal bulge are an order of magnitude higher than the mean value found in local spheroidal galaxies, which is in agreement with results from previous CO observations of high redshift quasars.
  • We have been carrying out a systematic survey of the star formation and ISM properties in the host galaxies of z~6 quasars. Our 250 GHz observations, together with available data from the literature, yield a sample of 14 z~6 quasars that are bright in millimeter dust continuum emission with estimated FIR luminosities of a few 10^12 to 10^13 Lsun. Most of these millimeter-detected z~6 quasars have also been detected in molecular CO line emission, indicating molecular gas masses on order of 10^10 Msun. We have searched for [C II] 158 micron fine structure line emission toward four of the millimeter bright z~6 quasars with ALMA and all of them have been detected. All these results suggest massive star formation at rates of about 600 to 2000 Msun/yr over the central few kpc region of these quasar host galaxies.
  • We have used the Green Bank Telescope to carry out a deep search for redshifted CO J=2-1 line emission from an extended (>17 kpc) Ly-Alpha blob (LAB), "Himiko", at z~6.595. Our non-detection of CO J=2-1 emission places the strong 3-sigma upper limit of L'_CO < 1.8x10^10 x sqrt(dV/250) K km/s pc^2 on the CO line luminosity. This is comparable to the best current limits on the CO line luminosity in LABs at z~3 and lower-luminosity Lyman-Alpha emitters (LAEs) at z>~6.5. High-z LABs appear to have lower CO line luminosities than the host galaxies of luminous quasars and sub-mm galaxies at similar redshifts, despite their high stellar mass. Although the CO-to-H2 conversion factor is uncertain for galaxies in the early Universe, we assume X_CO = 0.8 Msun (K km/s pc^2)^-1 to obtain the limit M(H_2) < 1.4 x 10^10 Msun on Himiko's molecular gas mass; this is a factor of >2.5 lower than the stellar mass in the z~6.595 LAB.
  • We present observations of CO J=2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z~1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10^14 Msun) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3-sigma upper limits to the CO J=2-1 line luminosities, L'_CO < 6.08x10^9 and < 6.63x10^9 K km/s pc^2. Assuming a CO-to-H_2 conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local Universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M_H_2 < 4.86x10^9 Msun and M_H_2 < 5.30x10^9 Msun. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power-law, suggesting that an AGN contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L_IR < 7.4x10^11 Lsun, is serendipitously detected in CO J=2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'_CO = (1.94 +/- 0.35)x10^10 K km/s pc^2, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M_H_2 = (1.55+/-0.28)x10^10 Msun. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z~1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star-formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.
  • We present new millimeter and radio observations of nine z~6 quasars discovered in deep optical and near-infrared surveys. We observed the 250 GHz continuum in eight of the nine objects and detected three of them. New 1.4 GHz radio continuum data have been obtained for four sources, and one has been detected. We searched for molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three 250 GHz detections and detected two of them. We study the FIR and radio emission and quasar-host galaxy evolution with a sample of 18 z~6 quasars that are faint at UV/optical wavelengths (rest-frame 1450A magnitudes of m_1450\ge20.2). The average FIR-to-AGN UV luminosity ratio of this faint quasar sample is about two times higher than that of the bright quasars at z~6 (m_1450<20.2). A fit to the average FIR and AGN bolometric luminosities of both the UV/optically faint and bright z~6 quasars, and the average luminosities of samples of submillimeter /millimeter-observed quasars at z~2 to 5, yields a relationship of L_{FIR} {L_{bol}}^{0.62}. Five of the 18 faint z~6 quasars have been detected at 250 GHz. These 250 GHz detections, as well as most of the millimeter-detected optically bright z~6 quasars, follow a shallower trend of L_{FIR} {L_{bol}}^{0.45} defined by the starburst-AGN systems in local and high-z universe. The millimeter continuum detections in the five objects and molecular CO detections in three of them reveal a few x10^8 M_sun of FIR-emitting warm dust and 10^10 M_sun of molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. All these results argue for massive star formation in the quasar host galaxies, with estimated star formation rates of a few hundred M_sun yr^{-1}. Additionally, the higher FIR-to-AGN luminosity ratio found in these 250 GHz-detected faint quasars also suggests a higher ratio between star formation rate and supermassive black hole accretion rate than the UV/optically most luminous quasars at z~6.
  • We report new observations of CO (2-1) line emission toward five z~6 quasars using the Ka-band receiver system on the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). Strong detections were obtained in two of them, SDSS J092721.82+200123.7 and CFHQS J142952.17+544717.6, and a marginal detection was obtained in another source, SDSS J084035.09+562419.9. Upper limits of the CO (2-1) line emission have been obtained for the other two objects. The CO (2-1) line detection in J0927+2001, together with previous measurements of the CO (6-5) and (5-4) lines, reveals important constraints on the CO excitation in the central ~10 kpc region of the quasar host galaxy. The CO (2-1) line emission from J1429+5447 is resolved into two distinct peaks separated by 1.2" (~6.9 kpc), indicating a possible gas-rich, major merging system, and the optical quasar position is consistent with the west peak. This result is in good agreement with the picture in which intense host galaxy star formation is coeval with rapid supermassive black hole accretion in the most distant universe. The two EVLA detections are ideal targets for further high-resolution imaging (e.g., with ALMA or EVLA observations) to study the gas distribution, dynamics, and SMBH-bulge mass relation in these earliest quasar-host galaxy systems.
  • Using the 12m APEX telescope, we have detected redshifted emission from the 157.74micron [CII] line in the z=4.4074 quasar BRI1335-0417. The linewidth and redshift are in good agreement with previous observations of high-J CO line emission. We measure a [CII] line luminosity, L_[CII] = (16.4 +/- 2.6)x10^9 Lsun, making BRI~1335-0417 the most luminous, unlensed [CII] line emitter known at high-redshift. The [CII]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of (5.3+/-0.8)x10^-4 is ~3x higher than expected for an average object with a FIR luminosity L_FIR = 3.1x10^13 Lsun, if this ratio were to follow the trend observed in other FIR-bright galaxies that have been detected in [CII] line emission. These new data suggest that the scatter in the [CII]-to-FIR luminosity ratio could be larger than previously expected for high luminosity objects. BR1335-0417 has a similar FIR luminosity and [CII]/CO luminosity compared to local ULIRGS and appears to be a gas-rich merger forming stars at a rate of a few thousand solar masses per year.
  • We report the detection of the CO J=1-0 emission line in three near-infrared selected star-forming galaxies at z~1.5 with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Green Bank telescope (GBT). These observations directly trace the bulk of molecular gas in these galaxies. We find H_2 gas masses of 8.3 \pm 1.9 x 10^{10} M_sun, 5.6 \pm 1.4 x 10^{10} M_sun and 1.23 \pm 0.34 x 10^{11} M_sun for BzK-4171, BzK-21000 and BzK-16000, respectively, assuming a conversion alpha_CO=3.6 M_sun (K km s^{-1} pc^{2})^{-1}. We combined our observations with previous CO 2-1 detections of these galaxies to study the properties of their molecular gas. We find brightness temperature ratios between the CO 2-1 and CO 1-0 emission lines of 0.80_{-0.22}^{+0.35}, 1.22_{-0.36}^{+0.61} and 0.41_{-0.13}^{+0.23} for BzK-4171, BzK-21000 and BzK-16000, respectively. At the depth of our observations it is not possible to discern between thermodynamic equilibrium or sub-thermal excitation of the molecular gas at J=2. However, the low temperature ratio found for BzK-16000 suggests sub-thermal excitation of CO already at J=2. For BzK-21000, a Large Velocity Gradient model of its CO emission confirms previous results of the low-excitation of the molecular gas at J=3. From a stacked map of the CO 1-0 images, we measure a CO 2-1 to CO 1-0 brightness temperature ratio of 0.92_{-0.19}^{+0.28}. This suggests that, on average, the gas in these galaxies is thermalized up to J=2, has star-formation efficiencies of ~100 L_sun (K km s^{-1} pc^2)^{-1} and gas consumption timescales of ~0.4 Gyr, unlike SMGs and QSOs at high redshifts.
  • We report our new observations of redshifted carbon monoxide emission from six z~6 quasars, using the PdBI. CO (6-5) or (5-4) line emission was detected in all six sources. Together with two other previous CO detections, these observations provide unique constraints on the molecular gas emission properties in these quasar systems close to the end of the cosmic reionization. Complementary results are also presented for low-J CO lines observed at the GBT and the VLA, and dust continuum from five of these sources with the SHARC-II bolometer camera at the CSO. We then present a study of the molecular gas properties in our combined sample of eight CO-detected quasars at z~6. The detections of high-order CO line emission in these objects indicates the presence of highly excited molecular gas, with estimated masses on the order of 10^10 M_sun within the quasar host galaxies. No significant difference is found in the gas mass and CO line width distributions between our z~6 quasars and samples of CO-detected $1.4\leq z\leq5$ quasars and submillimeter galaxies. Most of the CO-detected quasars at z~6 follow the far infrared-CO luminosity relationship defined by actively star-forming galaxies at low and high redshifts. This suggests that ongoing star formation in their hosts contributes significantly to the dust heating at FIR wavelengths. The result is consistent with the picture of galaxy formation co-eval with supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion in the earliest quasar-host systems. We investigate the black hole--bulge relationships of our quasar sample, using the CO dynamics as a tracer for the dynamical mass of the quasar host. The results place important constraints on the formation and evolution of the most massive SMBH-spheroidal host systems at the highest redshift.
  • We present Expanded Very Large Array and Arecibo observations of two lensed submm galaxies at z~2.5, in order to search for redshifted 22.235 GHz water megamaser emission. Both SMM J14011+0252 and SMM J16359+6612 have multi-wavelength characteristics consistent with ongoing starburst activity, as well as CO line emission indicating the presence of warm molecular gas. Our observations do not reveal any evidence for H2O megamaser emission in either target, while the lensing allows us to obtain deep limits to the H_2O line luminosities, L(H2O) < 7470 Lsun (3-sigma) in the case of SMM J14011+0252, and L(H2O) < 1893 Lsun for SMM J16359+6612, assuming linewidths of 80 km/s. Our search for, and subsequent non-detection of H2O megamaser emission in two strongly lensed starburst galaxies, rich in gas and dust, suggests that such megamaser emission is not likely to be common within the unlensed population of high-redshift starburst galaxies. We use the recent detection of strong H2O megamaser emission in the lensed quasar, MG J0414+0534 at z = 2.64 to make predictions for future EVLA C-band surveys of H2O megamaser emission in submm galaxies hosting AGN.
  • We present the radio and X-ray properties of 1.2 mm MAMBO source candidates in a 1600 sq. arcmin field centered on the Abell 2125 galaxy cluster at z=0.247. The brightest, non-synchrotron mm source candidate in the field has a photometric redshift, z = 3.93^+1.11_-0.80, and is not detected in a 31 ks Chandra X-ray exposure. These findings are consistent with this object being an extremely dusty and luminous starburst galaxy at high-redshift, possibly the most luminous yet identified in any blank-field mm survey. The deep 1.4 GHz VLA imaging identifies counterparts for 83% of the 29 mm source candidates identified at >=4-sigma S(1.2mm) = 2.7 - 52.1 mJy, implying that the majority of these objects are likely to lie at z <~ 3.5. The median mm-to-radio wavelength photometric redshift of this radio-detected sample is z~2.2 (first and third quartiles of 1.7 and 3.0), consistent with the median redshift derived from optical spectroscopic surveys of the radio-detected subsample of bright submm galaxies (S(850um) > 5 mJy). Three mm-selected quasars are confirmed to be X-ray luminous in the high resolution Chandra imaging, while another mm source candidate with potential multiple radio counterparts is also detected in the X-ray regime. Both of these radio counterparts are positionally consistent with the mm source candidate. One counterpart is associated with an elliptical galaxy at z = 0.2425, but we believe that a second counterpart associated with a fainter optical source likely gives rise to the mm emission at z~1.
  • We present results from a sensitive search for CO J=1-0 line emission in two z> 6.5 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) with the Green Bank Telescope. CO J=1-0 emission was not detected from either object. For HCM 6A, at z ~ 6.56, the lensing magnification factor of ~4.5 implies that the CO non-detection yields stringent constraints on the CO J=1-0 line luminosity and molecular gas mass of the LAE, L'(CO) < 6.1x10^9 x (dV/300)^(1/2) K km/s pc^2 and M(H_2) < 4.9x10^9 x (dV/300)^(1/2) x (X(CO)/0.8) Msun. These are the strongest limits obtained so far for a z >~ 6 galaxy. For IOK-1, the constraints are somewhat less sensitive, L'(CO) < 2.3x10^10 x (dV/300)^(1/2) K km/s pc^2 and M(H_2) < 1.9x10^10 x (dV/300)^(1/2) x (X(CO)/0.8) Msun. The non-detection of CO J=1-0 emission in HCM~6A, whose high estimated star formation rate, dust extinction, and lensing magnification make it one of the best high-z LAEs for such a search, implies that typical z >~ 6 LAEs are likely to have significantly lower CO line luminosities than massive sub-mm galaxies and hyperluminous infrared quasars at similar redshifts, due to either a significantly lower molecular gas content or a higher CO-to-H_2 conversion factor.
  • We report on interferometric imaging of the CO J=1--0 and J=3--2 line emission from the controversial QSO/galaxy pair HE 0450--2958. {\it The detected CO J=1--0 line emission is found associated with the disturbed companion galaxy not the luminous QSO,} and implies $\rm M_{gal}(H_2)\sim (1-2)\times 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, which is $\ga 30% $ of the dynamical mass in its CO-luminous region. Fueled by this large gas reservoir this galaxy is the site of an intense starburst with $\rm SFR\sim 370 M_{\odot} yr^{-1}$, placing it firmly on the upper gas-rich/star-forming end of Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, $\rm L_{IR}>10^{12} L_{\odot}$). This makes HE 0450--2958 the first case of extreme starburst and powerful QSO activity, intimately linked (triggered by a strong interaction) but not coincident. The lack of CO emission towards the QSO itself renews the controversy regarding its host galaxy by making a gas-rich spiral (the typical host of Narrow Line Seyfert~1 AGNs) less likely. Finally, given that HE 0450--2958 and similar IR-warm QSOs are considered typical ULIRG$\to $(optically bright QSO) transition candidates, our results raise the possibility that some may simply be {\it gas-rich/gas-poor (e.g. spiral/elliptical) galaxy interactions} which ``activate'' an optically bright unobscured QSO in the gas-poor galaxy, and a starburst in the gas-rich one. We argue that such interactions may have gone largely unnoticed even in the local Universe because the combination of tools necessary to disentagle the progenitors (high resolution and S/N optical {\it and} CO imaging) became available only recently.
  • We present observations of four z>= SDSS quasars at 350 micron with the SHARC-II bolometer camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. These are among the deepest observations that have been made by SHARC-II at 350 micron, and three quasars are detected at >=3 sigma significance, greatly increasing the sample of 350 micron (corresponds to rest frame wavelengths of <60 micron at z>=5), detected high-redshift quasars. The derived rest frame far-infrared (FIR) emission in the three detected sources is about five to ten times stronger than that expected from the average SED of the local quasars given the same 1450A luminosity. Combining the previous submillimeter and millimeter observations at longer wavelengths, the temperatures of the FIR-emitting warm dust from the three quasar detections are estimated to be in the range of 39 to 52 K. Additionally, the FIR-to-radio SEDs of the three 350 micron detections are consistent with the emission from typical star forming galaxies. The FIR luminosities are ~10^{13} L_solar and the dust masses are >= 10^{8}M_solar. These results confirm that huge amounts of warm dust can exist in the host galaxies of optically bright quasars as early as z~6. The universe is so young at these epochs (~1 Gyr) that a rapid dust formation mechanism is required. We estimate the size of the FIR dust emission region to be about a few kpc, and further provide a comparison of the SEDs among different kinds of dust emitting sources to investigate the dominant dust heating mechanism.