• We measure the stellar mass surface densities of early type galaxies by observing the micro-lensing of macro-lensed quasars caused by individual stars, including stellar remnants, brown dwarfs and red dwarfs too faint to produce photometric or spectroscopic signatures. Our method measures the graininess of the gravitational potential, in contrast to methods that decompose a smooth total gravitational potential into two smooth components, one stellar and one dark. We find the median likelihood value for the calibration factor F by which Salpeter stellar masses (with a low mass cutoff of 0.1 solar masses) must be multiplied is 1.23, with a one sigma confidence range of 0.77 < F < 2.10.
  • We measure the stellar mass surface densities of early type galaxies by observing the micro-lensing of macro-lensed quasars caused by individual stars, including stellar remnants, brown dwarfs and red dwarfs too faint to produce photometric or spectroscopic signatures. Instead of observing multiple micro-lensing events in a single system, we combine single epoch X-ray snapshots of ten quadruple systems, and compare the measured relative magnifications for the images with those computed from macro-models. We use these to normalize a stellar mass fundamental plane constructed using a Salpeter IMF with a low mass cutoff of 0.1 solar mass and treat the zeropoint of the surface mass density as a free parameter. Our method measures the graininess of the gravitational potential produced by individual stars, in contrast to methods that decompose a smooth total gravitational potential into two smooth components, one stellar and one dark. We find the median likelihood value for the normalization factor F by which the Salpeter stellar masses must be multiplied is 1.23, with a one sigma confidence range, dominated by small number statistics, of 0.77 < F < 2.10
  • Microlensing has proven an effective probe of the structure of the innermost regions of quasars, and an important test of accretion disk models. We present light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 in the R band and in the ultraviolet, and consider them together with X-ray light curves in two energy bands that are presented in a companion paper. Using a Bayesian Monte Carlo method, we constrain the size of the accretion disk in the rest-frame near- and far-UV, and constrain for the first time the size of the X-ray emission regions in two X-ray energy bands. The R-band scale size of the accretion disk is about 10^15.23 cm (~23 r_g), slightly smaller than previous estimates, but larger than would be predicted from the quasar flux. In the UV, the source size is weakly constrained, with a strong prior dependence. The UV to R-band size ratio is consistent with the thin disk model prediction, with large error bars. In soft and hard X-rays, the source size is smaller than ~10^14.8 cm (~10 r_g) at 95% confidence. We do not find evidence of structure in the X-ray emission region, as the most likely value for the ratio of the hard X-ray size to the soft X-ray size is unity. Finally, we find that the most likely value for the mean mass of stars in the lens galaxy is ~0.3 M_sun, consistent with other studies.
  • The gravitationally lensed quasar HE 1104-1805 has been observed at a variety of wavelengths ranging from the mid-infrared to X-ray for nearly 20 years. We combine flux ratios from the literature, including recent Chandra data, with new observations from the SMARTS telescope and HST, and use them to investigate the spatial structure of the central regions using a Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis of the microlensing variability. The wide wavelength coverage allows us to constrain not only the accretion disk half-light radius r_1/2, but the power-law slope \xi\ of the size-wavelength relation r_1/2 ~ \lambda^\xi. With a logarithmic prior on the source size, the (observed-frame) R-band half-light radius log(r_1/2/cm) is 16.0+0.3-0.4, and the slope \xi\ is 1.0+0.30-0.56. We put upper limits on the source size in soft (0.4-1.2 keV) and hard (1.2-8 keV) X-ray bands, finding 95% upper limits on log (r_1/2/cm) of 15.33 in both bands. A linear prior yields somewhat larger sizes, particularly in the X-ray bands. For comparison, the gravitational radius, using a black hole mass estimated using the H\beta\ line, is log(r_g/cm) = 13.94. We find that the accretion disk is probably close to face-on, with cos i = 1.0 being four times more likely than cos i = 0.5. We also find probability distributions for the mean mass of the stars in the foreground lensing galaxy, the direction of the transverse peculiar velocity of the lens, and the position angle of the projected accretion disk's major axis (if not face-on).
  • We present four new seasons of optical monitoring data and six epochs of X-ray photometry for the doubly-imaged lensed quasar Q J0158-4325. The high-amplitude, short-period microlensing variability for which this system is known has historically precluded a time delay measurement by conventional methods. We attempt to circumvent this limitation by application of a Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique, but we are only able to prove that the delay must have the expected sign (image A leads image B). Despite our failure to robustly measure the time delay, we successfully model the microlensing at optical and X-ray wavelengths to find a half light radius for soft X-ray emission log(r_{1/2,X,soft}/cm) = 14.3^{+0.4}_{-0.5}, an upper limit on the half-light radius for hard X-ray emission log(r_{1/2,X,hard}/cm) <= 14.6 and a refined estimate of the inclination-corrected scale radius of the optical R-band (rest frame 3100 Angstrom) continuum emission region of log(r_s/cm) = 15.6+-0.3.
  • We present a microlensing analysis of 61 Chandra observations of 14 quadruply lensed quasars. X-ray flux measurements of the individual quasar images give a clean determination of the microlensing effects in the lensing galaxy and thus offer a direct assessment of the local fraction of stellar matter making up the total integrated mass along the lines of sight through the lensing galaxy. A Bayesian analysis of the ensemble of lensing galaxies gives a most likely local stellar fraction of 7%, with the other 93% in a smooth, dark matter component, at an average impact parameter R_c of 6.6 kpc from the center of the lensing galaxy. We divide the systems into smaller ensembles based on R_c and find that the most likely local stellar fraction varies qualitatively and quantitatively as expected, decreasing as a function of R_c.
  • We use a sample of galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) Extended Source Catalog to refine a matched filter method of finding galaxy clusters that takes into account each galaxy's position, magnitude, and redshift if available. The matched filter postulates a radial density profile, luminosity function, and line-of-sight velocity distribution for cluster galaxies. We use this method to search for clusters in the galaxy catalog, which is complete to an extinction-corrected K-band magnitude of 13.25 and has spectroscopic redshifts for roughly 40% of the galaxies, including nearly all brighter than K = 11.25. We then use a stacking analysis to determine the average luminosity function, radial distribution, and velocity distribution of cluster galaxies in several richness classes, and use the results to update the parameters of the matched filter before repeating the cluster search. We also investigate the correlations between a cluster's richness and its velocity dispersion and core radius, using these relations to refine priors that are applied during the cluster search process. After the second cluster search iteration, we repeat the stacking analysis. We find a cluster galaxy luminosity function that fits a Schechter form, with parameters M_K* - 5 log h = -23.64\pm0.04 and \alpha = -1.07\pm0.03. We can achieve a slightly better fit to our luminosity function by adding a Gaussian component on the bright end to represent the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) population. The radial number density profile of galaxies closely matches a projected Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile at intermediate radii, with deviations at small radii due to well-known cluster centering issues and outside the virial radius due to correlated structure. The velocity distributions are Gaussian in shape, with velocity dispersions that correlate strongly with richness.
  • We present our long term Chandra X-ray monitoring data for the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 with 20 epochs spanning 10 years. We easily detect microlensing variability between the images in the full (0.2--8 keV), soft (0.2--2 keV), and hard (2--8 keV) bands at very high confidence. We also detect, for the first time, chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands. The hard X-ray band is more strongly microlensed than the soft band, suggesting that the corona above the accretion disk thought to generate the X-rays has a non-uniform electron distribution, in which the hotter and more energetic electrons occupy more compact regions surrounding the black holes. Both the hard and soft X-ray bands are more strongly microlensed than the optical (restframe UV) emission, indicating that the X-ray emission is more compact than the optical, confirming the microlensing results from other lenses.
  • Microlensing perturbations to the flux ratios of gravitationally lensed quasar images can vary with wavelength because of the chromatic dependence of the accretion disk's apparent size. Multiwavelength observations of microlensed quasars can thus constrain the temperature profiles of their accretion disks, a fundamental test of an important astrophysical process which is not currently possible using any other method. We present single-epoch broadband flux ratios for 12 quadruply lensed quasars in eight bands ranging from 0.36 to 2.2 microns, as well as Chandra 0.5--8 keV flux ratios for five of them. We combine the optical/IR and X-ray ratios, together with X-ray ratios from the literature, using a Bayesian approach to constrain the half-light radii of the quasars in each filter. Comparing the overall disk sizes and wavelength slopes to those predicted by the standard thin accretion disk model, we find that on average the disks are larger than predicted by nearly an order of magnitude, with sizes that grow with wavelength with an average slope of ~0.2 rather than the slope of 4/3 predicted by the standard thin disk theory. Though the error bars on the slope are large for individual quasars, the large sample size lends weight to the overall result. Our results present severe difficulties for a standard thin accretion disk as the main source of UV/optical radiation from quasars.
  • Microlensing perturbations to the magnification of gravitationally lensed quasar images are dependent on the angular size of the quasar. If quasar variability at visible wavelengths is caused by a change in the area of the accretion disk, it will affect the microlensing magnification. We derive the expected signal, assuming that the luminosity scales with some power of the disk area, and estimate its amplitude using simulations. We discuss the prospects for detecting the effect in real-world data and for using it to estimate the logarithmic slope of the luminosity's dependence on disk area. Such an estimate would provide a direct test of the standard thin accretion disk model. We tried fitting six seasons of the light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 including this effect as a modification to the Kochanek et al. (2006) approach to estimating time delays. We find a dramatic improvement in the goodness of fit and relatively plausible parameters, but a robust estimate will require a full numerical calculation in order to correctly model the strong correlations between the structure of the microlensing magnification patterns and the magnitude of the effect. We also comment briefly on the effect of this phenomenon for the stability of time delay estimates.
  • We present the discovery of a new quadruply lensed quasar. The lens system, SDSS J1330+1810 at z_s=1.393, was identified as a lens candidate from the spectroscopic sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Optical and near-infrared images clearly show four quasar images with a maximum image separation of 1.76", as well as a bright lensing galaxy. We measure a redshift of the lensing galaxy of z_l=0.373 from absorption features in the spectrum. We find a foreground group of galaxies at z=0.31 centred ~120" southwest of the lens system. Simple mass models fit the data quite well, including the flux ratios between images, although the lens galaxy appears to be ~1 mag brighter than expected by the Faber-Jackson relation. Our mass modelling suggests that shear from nearby structure is affecting the lens potential.
  • The Hamburg/ESO quasar HE 1113-0641 is found to be a quadruple gravitational lens, based on observations with the twin 6.5m Magellan telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory, and subsequently with the Hubble Space Telescope. The z_S=1.235 quasar appears in a cross configuration, with i' band magnitudes ranging from 18.0 to 18.8. With a maximum image separation of 0.67'', this is the smallest-separation quadruple ever identified using a ground-based optical telescope. PSF subtraction reveals a faint lensing galaxy. A simple lens model succeeds in predicting the observed positions of the components, but fails to match their observed flux ratios by up to a magnitude. We estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be z_L~0.7. Time delay estimates are on the order of a day, suggesting that the flux ratio anomalies are not due to variability of the quasar, but may result from substructure or microlensing in the lens galaxy.
  • X-ray and optical observations of quadruply lensed quasars can provide a microarcsecond probe of the lensed quasar, corresponding to scale sizes of \~10^2-10^4 gravitational radii of the central black hole. This high angular resolution is achieved by taking advantage of microlensing by stars in the lensing galaxy. In this paper we utilize X-ray observations of ten lensed quasars recorded with the Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as corresponding optical data obtained with either the Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based optical telescopes. These are analyzed in a systematic and uniform way with emphasis on the flux-ratio anomalies that are found relative to the predictions of smooth lens models. A comparison of the flux ratio anomalies between the X-ray and optical bands allows us to conclude that the optical emission regions of the lensed quasars are typically larger than expected from basic thin disk models by factors of ~3-30.
  • PG 1115+080 is a quadruply lensed quasar at z=1.72 whose image positions are well fit by simple models of the lens galaxy (at z=0.31). At optical wavelengths, the bright close pair of images exhibits a modest flux ratio anomaly (factors of ~1.2-1.4 over the past 22 years) with respect to these same models. We show here that as observed in X-rays with Chandra, the flux ratio anomaly is far more extreme, roughly a factor of 6. The contrasting flux ratio anomalies in the optical and X-ray band confirm the microlensing hypothesis and set a lower limit on the size of the optical continuum emission region that is \~10-100 times larger than expected from a thin accretion disk model.
  • The evolution of rest-frame B-band luminosities, stellar masses, and number densities of field galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North and South are studied as a function of rest-frame B-band morphological type out to redshifts z~3 using a sample of 1231 I < 27 galaxies with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts. We find that the co-moving number, and relative number, densities of ellipticals and spirals declines rapidly at z > 1, although examples exist at z > 2. The number and number fraction of peculiar galaxies consistent with undergoing major mergers rises consistently at redshifts z > 2. Through simulations we argue that this decline is robust at the 4 sigma level against morphological k-corrections and redshift effects. We trace the evolution of rest-frame B-band luminosity density as a function of morphology out to z~3 finding that the luminosity density is steadily dominated by peculiars at z > 1.5 with a peak fraction of 60-90% at z~3. By z~0.5 B-band luminosity fractions are similar to their local values. The stellar mass density follows a similar trend as the luminosity density, with some important exceptions. At high redshifts, z > 2, over 60-80% of stellar mass is attached to peculiars, while at z< 1, 80-95% of stellar mass is attached to ellipticals and spirals. In contrast to the luminosity density, the stellar mass density of ellipticals is greater than spirals at z < 1.5, and the stellar masses in both types grow together at z < 1, while number densities remain constant. (abridged)