• We present the results of an extensive observational campaign on the nearby Type Ibn SN 2015G, including data from radio through ultraviolet wavelengths. SN 2015G was asymmetric, showing late-time nebular lines redshifted by ~1000 km/s. It shared many features with the prototypical SN In 2006jc, including extremely strong He I emssion lines and a late-time blue pseudocontinuum. The young SN 2015G showed narrow P-Cygni profiles of He I, but never in its evolution did it show any signature of hydrogen - arguing for a dense, ionized, and hydrogen-free circumstellar medium moving outward with a velocity of ~1000 km/s and created by relatively recent mass loss from the progenitor star. Ultraviolet through infrared observations show that the fading SN 2015G (which was probably discovered some 20 days post-peak) had a spectral energy distribution that was well described by a simple, single-component blackbody. Archival HST images provide upper limits on the luminosity of SN 2015G's progenitor, while nondetections of any luminous radio afterglow and optical nondetections of outbursts over the past two decades provide constraints upon its mass-loss history.
  • A search for the progenitor of SN~2010jl, an unusually luminous core-collapse supernova of Type~IIn, using pre-explosion {\it Hubble}/WFPC2 and {\it Spitzer}/IRAC images of the region, yielded upper limits on the UV and near-infrared (IR) fluxes from any candidate star. These upper limits constrain the luminosity and effective temperature of the progenitor, the mass of any preexisting dust in its surrounding circumstellar medium (CSM), and dust proximity to the star. A {\it lower} limit on the CSM dust mass is required to hide a luminous progenitor from detection by {\it Hubble}. {\it Upper} limits on the CSM dust mass and constraints on its proximity to the star are set by requiring that the absorbed and reradiated IR emission not exceed the IRAC upper limits. Using the combined extinction-IR emission constraints we present viable $M_d-R_1$ combinations, where $M_d$ and $R_1$ are the CSM dust mass and its inner radius. These depend on the CSM outer radius, dust composition and grain size, and the properties of the progenitor. The results constrain the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor, and the nature and origin of the observed post-explosion IR emission from SN~2010jl. In particular, an $\eta$~Car-type progenitor will require at least 4~mag of visual extinction to avoid detection by the {\it Hubble}. This can be achieved with dust masses $\gtrsim 10^{-3}$~\msun\ (less than the estimated 0.2-0.5~\msun\ around $\eta$~Car) which must be located at distances of $\gtrsim 10^{16}$~cm from the star to avoid detection by {\it Spitzer}.
  • The nature of the progenitor star (or system) for the Type IIn supernova (SN) subclass remains uncertain. While there are direct imaging constraints on the progenitors of at least four Type IIn supernovae, one of them being SN 2010jl, ambiguities remain in the interpretation of the unstable progenitors and the explosive events themselves. A blue source in pre-explosion HST/WFPC2 images falls within the 5 sigma astrometric error circle derived from post-explosion ground-based imaging of SN 2010jl. At the time the ground-based astrometry was published, however, the SN had not faded sufficiently for post-explosion HST follow-up observations to determine a more precise astrometric solution and/or confirm if the pre-explosion source had disappeared, both of which are necessary to ultimately disentangle the possible progenitor scenarios. Here we present HST/WFC3 imaging of the SN 2010jl field obtained in 2014 and 2015, when the SN had faded sufficiently to allow for new constraints on the progenitor. The SN, which is still detected in the new images, is offset by 0."099 +/- 0."008 (24 +/- 2 pc) from the underlying and extended source of emission that contributes at least partially, if not entirely, to the blue source previously suggested as the candidate progenitor in the WFPC2 data. This point alone rules out the possibility that the blue source in the pre-explosion images is the exploding star, but may instead suggest an association with a young (<5-6 Myr) cluster and still argues for a massive (>30 solar masses) progenitor. We obtain new upper limits on the flux from a single star at the SN position in the pre-explosion WFPC2 and Spitzer/IRAC images that may ultimately be used to constrain the progenitor properties.
  • Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ~1 to ~200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in 7 galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.