• A critical bottleneck for stellar astrophysics and exoplanet science using data from the $Kepler$ mission has been the lack of precise radii and evolutionary states of the observed target stars. Here we present revised radii of 186,813 $Kepler$ stars derived by combining parallaxes from $Gaia$ Data Release 2 with the DR25 $Kepler$ Stellar Properties Catalog. The median radius precision is $\approx$8%, a factor 4-5 improvement over previous estimates for typical $Kepler$ stars. We find that $\approx$65% ($\approx$ 128,000) of all $Kepler$ targets are main-sequence stars, $\approx$23% ($\approx$ 40,600) are subgiants, and $\approx$12% ($\approx$ 23,000) are red giants, demonstrating that subgiant contamination is less severe than previously thought and that the $Kepler$ parent population mostly consists of unevolved main-sequence stars. Using the revised stellar radii, we recalculate the radii for 2218 confirmed and 1958 candidate exoplanets. Our results confirm the presence of a gap in the radius distribution of small, close-in planets, but yield evidence that the gap is mostly limited to incident fluxes $>$200$F_\oplus$ and may be located closer to 2$R_\oplus$. We furthermore find several confirmed exoplanets which occupy the "hot super-Earth desert", detect direct evidence for a correlation of gas-giant planet inflation with increasing incident flux, and establish a bona-fide sample of 8 confirmed planets and 34 planet candidates with $< 2 R_\oplus$ in the habitable zone. The results presented here demonstrate the enormous potential for the precise characterization of stellar and exoplanet populations using the transformational dataset provided by $Gaia$.
  • Stellar surface rotation carries information about stellar parameters---particularly ages---and thus the large rotational datasets extracted from Kepler timeseries represent powerful probes of stellar populations. In this article, we address the challenge of interpreting such datasets with a forward-modeling exercise. We combine theoretical models of stellar rotation, a stellar population model for the galaxy, and prescriptions for observational bias and confusion to predict the rotation distribution in the Kepler field under standard "vanilla" assumptions. We arrive at two central conclusions: first, that standard braking models fail to reproduce the observed distribution at long periods, and second, that the interpretation of the period distribution is complicated by mixtures of unevolved and evolved stars and observational uncertainties. By assuming that the amplitude and thus detectability of rotational signatures is tied to the Rossby number, we show that the observed period distribution contains an apparent "Rossby edge" at $\textrm{Ro}_{thresh} = 2.08$, above which long-period, high-Rossby number stars are either absent or undetected. This $\textrm{Ro}_{thresh}$ is comparable to the Rossby number at which van Saders et al. (2016) observed the onset of weakened magnetic braking, and suggests either that this modified braking is in operation in the full Kepler population, or that stars undergo a transition in spottedness and activity at a very similar Rossby number. We discuss the observations necessary to disentangle these competing scenarios. (abridged)
  • A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can---unlike existing models---reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.
  • Stellar rotation is a strong function of both mass and evolutionary state. Missions such as Kepler and CoRoT provide tens of thousands of rotation periods, drawn from stellar populations that contain objects at a range of masses, ages, and evolutionary states. Given a set of reasonable starting conditions and a prescription for angular momentum loss, we address the expected range of rotation periods for cool field stellar populations. We find that cool stars fall into three distinct regimes in rotation. Rapid rotators with surface periods less than 10 days are either young low-mass main sequence (MS) stars, or higher mass subgiants which leave the MS with high rotation rates. Intermediate rotators (10-40 days) can be either cool MS dwarfs, suitable for gyrochronology, or crossing subgiants at a range of masses. Gyrochronology relations must therefore be applied cautiously, since there is an abundant population of subgiant contaminants. The slowest rotators, at periods greater than 40 days, are lower mass subgiants undergoing envelope expansion. We identify additional diagnostic uses of rotation periods. There exists a period-age relation for subgiants distinct from the MS period-age relations. There is also a period-radius relation that can be used as a constraint on the stellar radius, particularly in the interesting case of planet host stars. The high-mass/low-mass break in the rotation distribution on the MS persists onto the subgiant branch, and has potential as a diagnostic of stellar mass. Finally, this set of theoretical predictions can be compared to extensive datasets to motivate improved modeling.
  • We present the discovery of KELT-1b, the first transiting low-mass companion from the wide-field Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope-North (KELT-North) survey. The V=10.7 primary is a mildly evolved, solar-metallicity, mid-F star. The companion is a low-mass brown dwarf or super-massive planet with mass of 27.23+/-0.50 MJ and radius of 1.110+0.037-0.024 RJ, on a very short period (P=1.21750007) circular orbit. KELT-1b receives a large amount of stellar insolation, with an equilibrium temperature assuming zero albedo and perfect redistribution of 2422 K. Upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth indicate that either the companion must have a non-zero albedo, or it must experience some energy redistribution. Comparison with standard evolutionary models for brown dwarfs suggests that the radius of KELT-1b is significantly inflated. Adaptive optics imaging reveals a candidate stellar companion to KELT-1, which is consistent with an M dwarf if bound. The projected spin-orbit alignment angle is consistent with zero stellar obliquity, and the vsini of the primary is consistent with tidal synchronization. Given the extreme parameters of the KELT-1 system, we expect it to provide an important testbed for theories of the emplacement and evolution of short-period companions, and theories of tidal dissipation and irradiated brown dwarf atmospheres.
  • We report on the discovery of an instability in low mass stars just above the threshold ($\sim 0.35 \textrm{M}_{\odot}$) where they are expected to be fully convective on the main sequence. Non-equilibrium He3 burning creates a convective core, which is separated from a deep convective envelope by a small radiative zone. The steady increase in central He3 causes the core to grow until it touches the surface convection zone, which triggers fully convective episodes in what we call the "convective kissing instability". These episodes lower the central abundance and cause the star to return to a state in which is has a separate convective core and envelope. These periodic events eventually cease when the He3 abundance throughout the star is sufficiently high that the star is fully convective, and remains so for the rest of its main sequence lifetime. The episodes correspond to few percent changes in radius and luminosity, over Myr to Gyr timescales. We discuss the physics of the instability, as well as prospects for detecting its signatures in open clusters and wide binaries. Secondary stars in cataclysmic variables (CVs) will pass through this mass range, and this instability could be related to the observed paucity of such systems for periods between two and three hours. We demonstrate that the instability can be generated for CV secondaries with mass-loss rates of interest for such systems, and discuss potential implications.
  • The base of the convection zone is a source of acoustic glitches in the asteroseismic frequency spectra of solar-like oscillators, allowing one to precisely measure the acoustic depth to the feature. We examine the sensitivity of the depth of the convection zone to mass, stellar abundances, and input physics, and in particular, the use of a measurement of the acoustic depth to the CZ as an atmosphere-independent, absolute measure of stellar metallicities. We find that for low mass stars on the main sequence with $0.4 M_{\odot} \le M \le 1.6 M_{\odot}$, the acoustic depth to the base of the convection zone, normalized by the acoustic depth to the center of the star, $\tau_{cz,n}$, is both a strong function of mass, and varies at the 0.5-1% per 0.1 dex level in [Z/X], and is therefore also a sensitive probe of the composition. We estimate the theoretical uncertainties in the stellar models, and show that combined with reasonable observational uncertainties, we can expect measure the the metallicity to within 0.15 - 0.3 dex for solar-like stars. We discuss the applications of this work to rotational mixing, particularly in the context of the observed mid F star Li dip, and to distguishing between different mixtures of heavy elements.
  • Several photometric surveys for short-period transiting giant planets have targeted a number of open clusters, but no convincing detections have been made. Although each individual survey typically targeted an insufficient number of stars to expect a detection assuming the frequency of short-period giant planets found in surveys of field stars, we ask whether the lack of detections from the ensemble of open cluster surveys is inconsistent with expectations from the field planet population. We select a subset of existing transit surveys with well-defined selection criteria and quantified detection efficiencies, and statistically combine their null results to show that the upper limit on the planet fraction is 5.5% and 1.4% for 1.0 $R_{J}$ and 1.5 $R_{J}$ planets, respectively in the $3<P<5$ day period range. For the period range of $1<P<3$ days we find upper limits of 1.4% and 0.31% for 1.0 $R_{J}$ and 1.5 $R_{J}$, respectively. Comparing these results to the frequency of short-period giant planets around field stars in both radial velocity and transit surveys, we conclude that there is no evidence to suggest that open clusters support a fundamentally different planet population than field stars given the available data.