• The Kakimizu complex is usually defined in the context of knots, where it is known to be quasi-Euclidean. We here generalize the definition of the Kakimizu complex to surfaces and 3-manifolds (with or without boundary). Interestingly, in the setting of surfaces, the complexes and the techniques turn out to replicate those used to study the Torelli group, {\it i.e.,} the "nonlinear" subgroup of the mapping class group. Our main results are that the Kakimizu complexes of a surface are contractible and that they need not be quasi-Euclidean. It follows that there exist (product) $3$-manifolds whose Kakimizu complexes are not quasi-Euclidean.
  • In 1992, Osamu Kakimizu defined a complex that has become known as the Kakimizu complex of a knot. Vertices correspond to isotopy classes of minimal genus Seifert surfaces of the knot. Higher dimensional simplices correspond to collections of such classes of Seifert surfaces that admit disjoint representatives. We show that this complex is simply connected.
  • Kakimizu complex of a knot is a flag simplicial complex whose vertices correspond to minimal genus Seifert surfaces and edges to disjoint pairs of such surfaces. We discuss a general setting in which one can define a similar complex. We prove that this complex is contractible, which was conjectured by Kakimizu. More generally, the fixed-point set (in the Kakimizu complex) for any subgroup of an appropriate mapping class group is contractible or empty. Moreover, we prove that this fixed-point set is non-empty for finite subgroups, which implies the existence of symmetric Seifert surfaces.
  • We construct a sequence of pairs of 3-manifolds each with torus boundary and with the following two properties: 1) For the result of a carefully chosen glueing of the nth pair of 3-manifolds along their boundary tori, the ratio of the genus of the resulting 3-manifold to the sum of the genera of the pair of 3-manifolds is less than 1/2. 2) The result of amalgamating certain unstabilized Heegaard splittings of the pair of 3-manifolds to form a Heegaard splitting of the resulting 3-manifold produces a stabilized Heegaard splitting that can be destabilized successively n times.
  • We unify the notions of thin position for knots and for 3-manifolds and survey recent work concerning these notions.
  • Given a 3-manifold M containing an incompressible surface Q, we obtain an inequality relating the Heegaard genus of M and the Heegaard genera of the components of M - Q. Here the sum of the genera of the components of M - Q is bounded above by a linear expression in terms of the genus of M, the Euler characteristic of Q and the number of parallelism classes of essential annuli for which representatives can be simultaneously imbedded in the components of M - Q.
  • These notes grew out of a lecture series given at RIMS in the summer of 2001. The lecture series was aimed at a broad audience that included many graduate students. Its purpose lay in familiarizing the audience with the basics of 3-manifold theory and introducing some topics of current research. The first portion of the lecture series was devoted to standard topics in the theory of 3-manifolds. The middle portion was devoted to a brief study of Heegaaard splittings and generalized Heegaard splittings. The latter portion touched on a brand new topic: fork complexes.
  • Let M be a totally orientable graph manifold with characteristic submanifold T and let M = V cup_S W be a Heegaard splitting. We prove that S is standard. In particular, S is the amalgamation of strongly irreducible Heegaard splittings. The splitting surfaces S_i of these strongly irreducible Heegaard splittings have the property that for each vertex manifold N of M, S_i cap N is either horizontal, pseudohorizontal, vertical or pseudovertical.
  • We consider compact 3-manifolds M having a submersion h to R in which each generic point inverse is a planar surface. The standard height function on a submanifold of the 3-sphere is a motivating example. To (M, h) we associate a connectivity graph G. For M in the 3-sphere, G is a tree if and only if there is a Fox reimbedding of M which carries horizontal circles to a complete collection of complementary meridian circles. On the other hand, if the connectivity graph of the complement of M is a tree, then there is a level-preserving reimbedding of M so that its complement is a connected sum of handlebodies. Corollary: The width of a satellite knot is no less than the width of its pattern knot. In particular, the width of K_1 # K_2 is no less than the maximum of the widths of K_1 and K_2.
  • We describe a class of genus 2 closed hyperbolic 3-manifolds of arbitrarily large volume.
  • We provide a new proof of the following results of H. Schubert: If K is a satellite knot with companion J and pattern L that lies in a solid torus T in which it has index k, then the bridge numbers satisfy the following: 1) The bridge number of K is greater than or equal to the product of k and the bridge number of J; 2) If K is a composite knot (this is the case k = 1), then the bridge number of K is one less than the sum of the bridge numbers of J and L.
  • We analyze how a family of essential annuli in a compact 3-manifold will induce, from a strongly irreducible generalized Heegaard splitting of the ambient manifold, generalized Heegaard splittings of the complementary components. There are specific applications to the subadditivity of tunnel number of knots, improving somewhat bounds of Kowng. For example, in the absence of 2-bridge summands, the tunnel number of the sum of n knots is no less than 2/5 the sum of the tunnel numbers.
  • We prove that the tunnel number of the sum of n knots is at least n.
  • The Heegaard genus g of an irreducible closed orientable 3-manifold puts a limit on the number and complexity of the pieces that arise in the Jaco-Shalen-Johannson decomposition of the manifold by its canonical tori. For example, if p of the complementary components are not Seifert fibered, then p < g. This result generalizes work of Kobayashi. The Heegaard genus g also puts explicit bounds on the complexity of the Seifert pieces. For example, if the union of the base spaces of the Seifert pieces has Euler characteristic X and there are a total of f exceptional fibers in the Seifert pieces, then f - X is no greater than 3g - 3 - p.