• Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • During the merger of two galaxies, the resulting system undergoes violent relaxation and seeks stable equilibrium. However, the details of this evolution are not fully understood. Using Illustris simulation, we probe two physically related processes, mixing and relaxation. Though the two are driven by the same dynamics---global time-varying potential for the energy, and torques caused by asymmetries for angular momentum---we measure them differently. We define mixing as the redistribution of energy and angular momentum between particles of the two merging galaxies. We assess the degree of mixing as the difference between the shapes of their N(E)s, and their N(L^2)s. We find that the difference is decreasing with time, indicating mixing. To measure relaxation, we compare N(E) of the newly merged system to N(E) of a theoretical prediction for relaxed collisionless systems, DARKexp, and witness the system becoming more relaxed, in the sense that N(E) approaches DARKexp N(E). Because the dynamics driving mixing and relaxation are the same, the timescale is similar for both. We measure two sequential timescales: a rapid, 1 Gyr phase after the initial merger, during which the difference in N(E) of the two merging halos decreases by ~80%, followed by a slow phase, when the difference decreases by ~50% over ~8.5 Gyrs. This is a direct measurement of the relaxation timescale. Our work also draws attention to the fact that when a galaxy has reached Jeans equilibrium it may not yet have reached a fully relaxed state given by DARKexp, in that it retains information about its past history. This manifests itself most strongly in stars being centrally concentrated. We argue that it is particularly difficult for stars, and other tightly bound particles, to mix because they have less time to be influenced by the fluctuating potential, even across multiple merger events.
  • The physical characteristics of dust formed in supernovae is poorly known. In this paper, we investigate the extinction properties of dust formed in the type IIn SN 2005ip. The observed light curves of SN 2005ip all exhibit a sudden drop around 50 days after discovery. This has been attributed to dust formation in the dense circumstellar medium. We modeled the intrinsic light curves in six optical bands, adopting a theoretical model for the luminosity evolution of supernovae interacting with their circumstellar material. From the difference between the observed and intrinsic light curves, we calculated extinction curves as a function of time. The total-to-selective extinction ratio, $R_V$, was determined from the extinction in the B and V bands. The resulting extinction, $A_V$, increases monotonically up to about 1 mag, 150 days after discovery. The inferred $R_V$ value also increases slightly with time, but appears constant in the range 4.5--8, beyond 100 days after discovery. The analysis confirms that dust is likely formed in SN 2005ip, starting about two months after explosion. The high value of $R_V$, that is, gray dust, suggests dust properties different from of the Milky Way. While this result hinges on the assumed theoretical intrinsic light curve evolution, it is encouraging that the fitted light curves are as expected for standard ejecta and circumstellar medium density structures.
  • Significant observational effort has been devoted to determining volumetric type Ia supernova rates at high redshifts, leading to clues about the nature of Ia supernova progenitors and constraints on the iron production in the universe. A complementary approach is to investigate type Ia supernova rates in individual, more nearby, galaxies. The popular A+B model for the specific supernova rate, while reliable for a wide range of galaxy properties, diverges for large specific star formation rates. Applying it outside its range of validity could lead to the prediction of excessive type Ia supernova rates. Moreover, the A+B model it is not directly derived from a delay time distribution. We here introduce a new model which is explicitly motivated by a simple delay time distribution composed of a prompt and a delayed component. The model is in remarkably good agreement with current observational constraints. It yields a prompt fraction of $f_{p}= 0.11^{+0.10}_{-0.06}$ in agreement with results based on volumetric rates of type Ia supernovae at high redshift (Rodney et al. 2014). The model is tested against realistic star formation rates from the Illustris-1 simulation and is found to be self consistent in the asymptotic limits. An analytic function that encapsulates the features of the new model is shown to be in excellent agreement with the data. In terms of goodness of fit, the new model is strongly preferred over the A+B model. At $\log{({\rm sSFR})} \gtrsim -9$ there are no constraints from observations. Observations in this regime will further constrain the delay time distribution of type Ia supernovae at short delay times.
  • Binary neutron-star mergers (BNSMs) are among the most readily detectable gravitational-wave (GW) sources with LIGO. They are also thought to produce short $\gamma$-ray bursts (SGRBs), and kilonovae that are powered by r-process nuclei. Detecting these phenomena simultaneously would provide an unprecedented view of the physics during and after the merger of two compact objects. Such a Rosetta Stone event was detected by LIGO/Virgo on 17 August 2017 at a distance of $\sim40$~Mpc. We monitored the position of the BNSM with ALMA at 338.5 GHz and GMRT at 1.4 GHz, from 1.4 to 44 days after the merger. Our observations rule out any afterglow more luminous than $3\times 10^{26}~{\rm erg~s}^{-1}$ in these bands, probing $>$2--4 dex fainter than previous SGRB limits. We match these limits, in conjunction with public data announcing the appearance of X-ray and radio emission in the weeks after the GW event, to templates of off-axis afterglows. Our broadband modeling suggests that GW170817 was accompanied by a SGRB and that the GRB jet, powered by $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{50}$~erg, had a half-opening angle of $\sim20^\circ$, and was misaligned by $\sim41^\circ$ from our line of sight. The data are also consistent with a more powerful, collimated jet: $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{51}$~erg, $\theta_{1/2,\,\rm jet}\sim5^\circ$, $\theta_{\rm obs}\sim17^\circ$. This is the most conclusive detection of an off-axis GRB afterglow and the first associated with a BNSM-GW event to date. We use the viewing angle estimates to infer the initial bulk Lorentz factor and true energy release of the burst.
  • The historic detection of gravitational waves from a binary neutron star merger (GW170817) and its electromagnetic counterpart led to the first accurate (sub-arcsecond) localization of a gravitational-wave event. The transient was found to be $\sim$10" from the nucleus of the S0 galaxy NGC 4993. We report here the luminosity distance to this galaxy using two independent methods. (1) Based on our MUSE/VLT measurement of the heliocentric redshift ($z_{\rm helio}=0.009783\pm0.000023$) we infer the systemic recession velocity of the NGC 4993 group of galaxies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) frame to be $v_{\rm CMB}=3231 \pm 53$ km s$^{-1}$. Using constrained cosmological simulations we estimate the line-of-sight peculiar velocity to be $v_{\rm pec}=307 \pm 230$ km s$^{-1}$, resulting in a cosmic velocity of $v_{\rm cosmic}=2924 \pm 236$ km s$^{-1}$ ($z_{\rm cosmic}=0.00980\pm 0.00079$) and a distance of $D_z=40.4\pm 3.4$ Mpc assuming a local Hubble constant of $H_0=73.24\pm 1.74$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$. (2) Using Hubble Space Telescope measurements of the effective radius (15.5" $\pm$ 1.5") and contained intensity and MUSE/VLT measurements of the velocity dispersion, we place NGC 4993 on the Fundamental Plane (FP) of E and S0 galaxies. Comparing to a frame of 10 clusters containing 226 galaxies, this yields a distance estimate of $D_{\rm FP}=44.0\pm 7.5$ Mpc. The combined redshift and FP distance is $D_{\rm NGC 4993}= 41.0\pm 3.1$ Mpc. This 'electromagnetic' distance estimate is consistent with the independent measurement of the distance to GW170817 as obtained from the gravitational-wave signal ($D_{\rm GW}= 43.8^{+2.9}_{-6.9}$ Mpc) and confirms that GW170817 occurred in NGC 4993.
  • The unprecedented optical and near-infrared lightcurves of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave source, GW170817, a binary neutron star merger, exhibited a strong evolution from blue to near-infrared (a so-called 'kilonova' or 'macronova'). The emerging near-infrared component is widely attributed to the formation of r-process elements which provide the opacity to shift the blue light into the near infrared. An alternative scenario is that the light from the blue component gets extinguished by dust formed by the kilonova and subsequently is re-emitted at near-infrared wavelengths. We here test this hypothesis using the lightcurves of AT2017gfo, the kilonova accompanying GW170817. We find that of order 10$^{-5}$ $M_\odot$ of carbon is required to reproduce the optical/near-infrared lightcurves as the kilonova fades. This putative dust cools from $\sim$ 2000 K at $\sim$ 4 d after the event to $\sim$ 1500 K over the course of the following week, thus requiring dust with a high condensation temperature, such as carbon. We contrast this with the nucleosynthetic yields predicted by a range of kilonova wind models. These suggest that at most 10$^{-9}$ $M_\odot$ of carbon is formed. Moreover, the decay in the inferred dust temperature is slower than that expected in kilonova models. We therefore conclude that in current models of the blue component of the kilonova, the near-infrared component in the kilonova accompanying GW170817 is unlikely to be due to dust.
  • We present an analysis of 15 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshift z > 1 (9 at 1.5 < z < 2.3) recently discovered in the CANDELS and CLASH Multi-Cycle Treasury programs using WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We combine these SNe Ia with a new compilation of 1050 SNe Ia, jointly calibrated and corrected for simulated survey biases to produce accurate distance measurements. We present unbiased constraints on the expansion rate at six redshifts in the range 0.07 < z < 1.5 based only on this combined SN Ia sample. The added leverage of our new sample at z > 1.5 leads to a factor of ~3 improvement in the determination of the expansion rate at z = 1.5, reducing its uncertainty to ~20%, a measurement of H(z=1.5)/H0=2.67 (+0.83,-0.52). We then demonstrate that these six measurements alone provide a nearly identical characterization of dark energy as the full SN sample, making them an efficient compression of the SN Ia data. The new sample of SNe Ia at z > 1 usefully distinguishes between alternative cosmological models and unmodeled evolution of the SN Ia distance indicators, placing empirical limits on the latter. Finally, employing a realistic simulation of a potential WFIRST SN survey observing strategy, we forecast optimistic future constraints on the expansion rate from SNe Ia.
  • The spectacular success of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in SN-cosmology is based on the assumption that their photometric and spectroscopic properties are invariant with redshift. However, this fundamental assumption needs to be tested with observations of high-z SNe Ia. To date, the majority of SNe Ia observed at moderate to large redshifts (0.4 < z < 1.0) are faint, and the resultant analyses are based on observations with modest signal-to-noise ratios that impart a degree of ambiguity in their determined properties. In rare cases however, the Universe offers a helping hand: to date a few SNe Ia have been observed that have had their luminosities magnified by intervening galaxies and galaxy clusters acting as gravitational lenses. In this paper we present long-slit spectroscopy of the lensed SNe Ia 2016geu, which occurred at a redshift of z=0.409, and was magnified by a factor of ~55 by a galaxy located at z=0.216. We compared our spectra, which were obtained a couple weeks to a couple months past peak light, with the spectroscopic properties of well-observed, nearby SNe Ia, finding that SN 2016geu's properties are commensurate with those of SNe Ia in the local universe. Based primarily on the velocity and strength of the Si II 6355 absorption feature, we find that SN 2016geu can be classified as a high-velocity, high-velocity gradient and "core-normal" SN Ia. The strength of various features (measured though their pseudo-equivalent widths) argue against SN 2016geu being a faint, broad-lined, cool or shallow-silicon SN Ia. We conclude that the spectroscopic properties of SN 2016geu imply that it is a normal SN Ia, and when taking previous results by other authors into consideration, there is very little, if any, evolution in the observational properties of SNe Ia up to z~0.4. [Abridged]
  • Following the success of type Ia supernovae in constraining cosmologies at lower redshift $(z\lesssim2)$, effort has been spent determining if a similarly useful standardisable candle can be found at higher redshift. {In this work we determine the largest possible magnitude discrepancy between a constant dark energy $\Lambda$CDM cosmology and a cosmology in which the equation of state $w(z)$ of dark energy is a function of redshift for high redshift standard candles $(z\gtrsim2)$}. We discuss a number of popular parametrisations of $w(z)$ with two free parameters, $w_z$CDM cosmologies, including the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder and generalisation thereof, $n$CPL, as well as the Jassal-Bagla-Padmanabhan parametrisation. For each of these parametrisations we calculate and find extrema of $\Delta \mu$, the difference between the distance modulus of a $w_z$CDM cosmology and a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM cosmology as a function of redshift, given 68\% likelihood constraints on the parameters $P=(\Omega_{m,0}, w_0, w_a)$. The parameters are constrained using cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations, and type Ia supernovae data using CosmoMC. We find that none of the tested cosmologies can deviate more than 0.05 mag from the fiducial $\Lambda$CDM cosmology at high redshift, implying that high redshift standard candles will not aid in discerning between a $w_z$CDM cosmology and the fiducial $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. Conversely, this implies that if high redshift standard candles are found to be in disagreement with $\Lambda$CDM at high redshift, then this is a problem not only for $\Lambda$CDM but for the entire family of $w_z$CDM cosmologies.
  • We investigate the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) between the stellar mass and the integrated gas velocity dispersion, quantified by the kinematic estimator S_0.5 measured from strong emission lines in spectra of galaxies at 0<z<5. We combine luminosity-selected galaxies (`high-luminosity sample') with galaxies selected in other ways (`low-luminosity sample') to cover a range in stellar mass that spans almost five orders of magnitude: 7.0 < log M* < 11.5. We find that the logarithmic power-law slope and normalisation of the TFR are independent of redshift out to z~3. The scatter in the TFR is <0.5 dex such that the gas velocity dispersion can be used as a proxy for the stellar mass of a galaxy independently of its redshift. At z>3 the scatter increases and the existence of a correlation is not obvious. The high-luminosity sample exhibits a flatter slope of 1.5$\pm$0.2 at z<3 compared to the low-luminosity sample slope of 2.9$\pm$0.3, suggesting a turnover in the TFR. The combined sample is well fit with a break in the TFR at a characteristic stellar mass scale of M*~10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, with no significant evolution out to z~3. We demonstrate that a break in the TFR with a steeper slope at the low-mass end is a natural consequence of galaxy models with a mass-dependent stellar to halo-mass ratio.
  • We present new Jansky Very Large Array observations of five pre-Swift gamma-ray bursts for which an ultraluminous (SFR > 100 M_sun/yr) dusty host galaxy had previously been inferred from radio or submillimetre observations taken within a few years after the burst. In four of the five cases we no longer detect any source at the host location to limits much fainter than the original observations, ruling out the existence of an ultraluminous galaxy hosting any of these GRBs. We continue to detect a source at the position of GRB 980703, but it is much fainter than it was a decade ago and the inferred radio star-formation rate (~80 M_sun) is relatively modest. The radio flattening at 200-1000 days observed in the light curve of this GRB may have been caused by a decelerating counterjet oriented 180 degrees away from the viewer, although an unjetted wind model can also explain the data. Our results eliminate all well-established pre-Swift ULIRG hosts, and all cases for which an unobscured GRB was found in a galaxy dominated by heavily-obscured star-formation. When GRBs do occur in ULIRGs the afterglow is almost always observed to be heavily obscured, consistent with the large dust opacities and high dust covering fractions characteristic of these systems.
  • We test the DARKexp model for relaxed, self-gravitating, collisionless systems against equilibrium dark matter halos from the Millennium-II simulation. While limited tests of DARKexp against simulations and observations have been carried out elsewhere, this is the first time the testing is done with a large sample of simulated halos spanning a factor of ~ 50 in mass, and using independent fits to density and energy distributions. We show that DARKexp, a one shape parameter family, provides very good fits to the shapes of density profiles, \rho(r), and differential energy distributions, N(E), of individual simulated halos. The best fit shape parameter $\phi_{0}$ obtained from the two types of fits are correlated, though with scatter. Our most important conclusions come from \rho(r) and N(E) that have been averaged over many halos. These show that the bulk of the deviations between DARKexp and individual Millennium-II halos come from halo-to-halo fluctuations, likely driven by substructure, and other density perturbations. The average \rho(r) and N(E) are quite smooth and follow DARKexp very closely. The only deviation that remains after averaging is small, and located at most bound energies for N(E) and smallest radii for \rho(r). Since the deviation is confined to 3-4 smoothing lengths, and is larger for low mass halos, it is likely due to numerical resolution effects.
  • We present the discovery of the X-ray and optical afterglows of the short-duration GRB 150101B, pinpointing the event to an early-type host galaxy at z=0.1343 +/- 0.0030. This makes GRB 150101B the most nearby short GRB with an early-type host galaxy discovered to date. Fitting the spectral energy distribution of the host galaxy results in an inferred stellar mass of ~7x10^10 M_sol, stellar population age of ~2-2.5 Gyr, and star formation rate of <0.4 M_sol yr^-1. The host of GRB 150101B is one of the largest and most luminous short GRB host galaxies, with a B-band luminosity of ~4.3L* and half-light radius of ~8 kpc. GRB 150101B is located at a projected distance of 7.35 +/- 0.07 kpc from its host center, and lies on a faint region of its host rest-frame optical light. Its location, combined with the lack of associated supernova, is consistent with a NS-NS/NS-BH merger progenitor. From modeling the evolution of the broad-band afterglow, we calculate isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of ~1.3x10^49 erg and ~(6-14)x10^51 erg, respectively, a circumburst density of ~(0.8-4)x10^-5 cm^-3, and a jet opening angle of >9 deg. Using observations extending to ~30 days, we place upper limits of <(2-4)x10^41 erg s^-1 on associated kilonova emission. We compare searches following previous short GRBs to existing kilonova models, and demonstrate the difficulty of performing effective kilonova searches from cosmological short GRBs using current ground-based facilities. We show that at the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO horizon distance of 200 Mpc, searches reaching depths of ~23-24 AB mag are necessary to probe a meaningful range of kilonova models.
  • One usually thinks of a radial density profile as having a monotonically changing logarithmic slope, such as in NFW or Einasto profiles. However, in two different classes of commonly used systems, this is often not the case. These classes exhibit non-monotonic changes in their density profile slopes which we call oscillations for short. We analyze these two unrelated classes separately. Class 1 consists of systems that have density oscillations and that are defined through their distribution function $f(E)$, or differential energy distribution $N(E)$, such as isothermal spheres, King profiles, or DARKexp, a theoretically derived model for relaxed collisionless systems. Systems defined through $f(E)$ or $N(E)$ generally have density slope oscillations. Class 1 system oscillations can be found at small, intermediate, or large radii but we focus on a limited set of Class 1 systems that have oscillations in the central regions, usually at $\log(r/r_{-2})\lesssim -2$, where $r_{-2}$ is the largest radius where $d\log(\rho)/d\log(r)=-2$. We show that the shape of their $N(E)$ can roughly predict the amplitude of oscillations. Class 2 systems which are a product of dynamical evolution, consist of observed and simulated galaxies and clusters, and pure dark matter halos. Oscillations in the density profile slope seem pervasive in the central regions of Class 2 systems. We argue that in these systems, slope oscillations are an indication that a system is not fully relaxed. We show that these oscillations can be reproduced by small modifications to $N(E)$ of DARKexp. These affect a small fraction of systems' mass and are confined to $\log(r/r_{-2})\lesssim 0$. The size of these modifications serves as a potential diagnostic for quantifying how far a system is from being relaxed.
  • SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia Supernova (SN) discovered at z = 1.3457 +- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 +- 0.15 magnitudes brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of mu_obs = 2.03 +- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure "blind tests". The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured mu to within 1-sigma. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply-imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.
  • Dark-matter halos grown in cosmological simulations appear to have central NFW-like density cusps with mean values of $d\log\rho/d\log r \approx -1$, and some dispersion, which is generally parametrized by the varying index $\alpha$ in the Einasto density profile fitting function. Non-universality in profile shapes is also seen in observed galaxy clusters and possibly dwarf galaxies. Here we show that non-universality, at any given mass scale, is an intrinsic property of DARKexp, a theoretically derived model for collisionless self-gravitating systems. We demonstrate that DARKexp - which has only one shape parameter, $\phi_0$ - fits the dispersion in profile shapes of massive simulated halos as well as observed clusters very well. DARKexp also allows for cored dark-matter profiles, such as those found for dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We provide approximate analytical relations between DARKexp $\phi_0$, Einasto $\alpha$, or the central logarithmic slope in the Dehnen-Tremaine analytical $\gamma$-models. The range in halo parameters reflects a substantial variation in the binding energies per unit mass of dark-matter halos.
  • We report estimates of the cosmological parameters $\Omega_m$ and $\Omega_{\Lambda}$ obtained using supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts up to 0.606. Eight high-fidelity GRB-SNe with well-sampled light curves across the peak are used. We correct their peak magnitudes for a luminosity-decline rate relation to turn them into accurate standard candles with dispersion $\sigma = 0.18$ mag. We also estimate the peculiar velocity of the low-redshift host galaxy of SN 1998bw, using constrained cosmological simulations. In a flat universe, the resulting Hubble diagram leads to best-fit cosmological parameters of $(\Omega_m, \Omega_{\Lambda}) = (0.58^{+0.22}_{-0.25},0.42 ^{+0.25}_{-0.22})$. This exploratory study suggests that GRB-SNe can potentially be used as standardizable candles to high redshifts to measure distances in the universe and constrain cosmological parameters.
  • The origin of dust in galaxies is still a mystery. The majority of the refractory elements are produced in supernova explosions but it is unclear how and where dust grains condense and grow, and how they avoid destruction in the harsh environments of star-forming galaxies. The recent detection of 0.1-0.5 solar masses of dust in nearby supernova remnants suggests in situ dust formation, while other observations reveal very little dust in supernovae the first few years after explosion. Observations of the bright SN 2010jl have been interpreted as pre-existing dust, dust formation or no dust at all. Here we report the rapid (40-240 days) formation of dust in its dense circumstellar medium. The wavelength dependent extinction of this dust reveals the presence of very large (> 1 micron) grains, which are resistant to destructive processes. At later times (500-900 days), the near-IR thermal emission shows an accelerated growth in dust mass, marking the transition of the supernova from a circumstellar- to an ejecta-dominated source of dust. This provides the link between the early and late dust mass evolution in supernovae with dense circumstellar media.
  • Little is known about the diversity in the light curves of GRB-SNe, including whether the light curve of SN 1998bw can be used as a representative template or whether there is a luminosity-decline rate relation akin to that of SNe Ia. In this paper, we aim to obtain well-constrained light curves of GRB-SNe without the assumption of empirical or parametric templates and to investigate whether the peak brightness correlates with other parameters such as the light curve shape or the time of peak. We select eight SNe in the redshift range 0.0085 to 0.606, which are firmly associated with GRBs. The light curves of these GRB-SNe are well sampled across the peak. Afterglow and host galaxy contributions are subtracted and dust reddening is corrected for. Low-order polynomial functions are fitted to the light curves. A K-correction is applied to transform the light curves into the rest frame V band. GRB-SNe follow a luminosity-decline rate relation similar to the Phillips relation for SNe Ia, with $M_{V,peak} = 1.59^{+0.28}_{-0.24} \Delta m_{V,15} - 20.61^{+0.19}_{-0.22}$, with $\chi^2 = 5.2$ for 6 dof and $M_{V,peak}$ and $\Delta m_{V,15}$ being the peak magnitude and decline rate in V band. This luminosity-decline rate relation is tighter than the k-s relation, where k and s are the factors describing the relative brightness and width to the light curve of SN 1998bw. The peak luminosities of GRB-SNe are also correlated with the time of peak: the brighter the GRB-SN, the longer the rise time. The light curve of SN 1998bw stretched around the time of explosion can be used as a template for GRB-SNe with reasonable confidence, but stretching around the peak produces better results. The existence of such a relation provides a new constraint on GRB explosion models. GRB-SNe can be used as standardizable candles to measure cosmological distances and constrain cosmological parameters.
  • The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) was a multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that surveyed a total area of ~0.25 deg^2 with ~900 HST orbits spread across 5 fields over 3 years. Within these survey images we discovered 65 supernovae (SN) of all types, out to z~2.5. We classify ~24 of these as Type Ia SN (SN Ia) based on host-galaxy redshifts and SN photometry (supplemented by grism spectroscopy of 6 SN). Here we present a measurement of the volumetric SN Ia rate as a function of redshift, reaching for the first time beyond z=2 and putting new constraints on SN Ia progenitor models. Our highest redshift bin includes detections of SN that exploded when the universe was only ~3 Gyr old and near the peak of the cosmic star-formation history. This gives the CANDELS high-redshift sample unique leverage for evaluating the fraction of SN Ia that explode promptly after formation (<500 Myr). Combining the CANDELS rates with all available SN Ia rate measurements in the literature we find that this prompt SN Ia fraction is fP=0.53 +0.09 -0.10 (stat) +0.10 -0.26 (sys), consistent with a delay time distribution that follows a simple t^{-1} power law for all times t>40 Myr. However, a mild tension is apparent between ground-based low-z surveys and space-based high-z surveys. In both CANDELS and the sister HST program CLASH, we find a low rate of SN Ia at z>1. This could be a hint that prompt progenitors are in fact relatively rare, accounting for only ~20% of all SN Ia explosions -- though further analysis and larger samples will be needed to examine that suggestion.
  • Context: The Subaru Deep Field (SDF) Supernova Survey discovered 10 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 1.5<z<2.0, as determined solely from photometric redshifts of the host galaxies. However, photometric redshifts might be biased, and the SN sample could be contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Aims: We aim to obtain the first robust redshift measurement and classification of a z > 1.5 SDF SN Ia host galaxy candidate Methods: We use the X-shooter (U-to-K-band) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope to allow the detection of different emission lines in a wide spectral range. Results: We measure a spectroscopic redshift of 1.54563 +/- 0.00027 of hSDF0705.25, consistent with its photometric redshift of 1.552 +/- 0.018. From the strong emission-line spectrum we rule out AGN activity, thereby confirming the optical transient as a SN. The host galaxy follows the fundamental metallicity relation defined in Mannucci et al. (2010, 2011) showing that the properties of this high-redshift SN Ia host galaxy is similar to other field galaxies. Conclusions: Spectroscopic confirmation of additional SDF SN hosts would be required to confirm the cosmic SN rate evolution measured in the SDF.
  • There is a remarkably tight relation between the observationally inferred dust masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) of SDSS galaxies, Mdust $\propto$ SFR$^{1.11}$ (Da Cunha et al. 2010). Here we extend the Mdust-SFR relation to the high end and show that it bends over at very large SFRs (i.e., dust masses are lower than predicted for a given SFR). We identify several distinct evolutionary processes in the diagram: (1) A star-bursting phase in which dust builds up rapidly at early times. The maximum attainable dust mass in this process is the cause of the bend-over of the relation. A high dust-formation efficiency, a bottom-light initial mass function, and negligible supernova shock dust destruction are required to produce sufficiently high dust masses. (2) A quiescent star-forming phase in which the subsequent parallel decline in dust mass and SFR gives rise to the Mdust-SFR relation, through astration and dust destruction. The dust-to-gas ratio is approximately constant along the relation. We show that the power-law slope of the Mdust-SFR relation is inversely proportional to the global Schmidt-Kennicutt law exponent (i.e., $\sim 0.9$) in simple chemical evolution models. (3) A quenching phase which causes star formation to drop while the dust mass stays roughly constant or drops proportionally. Combined with merging, these processes, as well as the range in total baryonic mass, give rise to a complex population of the diagram which adds significant scatter to the original Mdust-SFR relation. (4) At very high redshifts, a population of galaxies located significantly below the local relation is predicted.
  • It has been shown in previous work that DARKexp, which is a theoretically derived, maximum entropy, one shape parameter model for isotropic collisionless systems, provides very good fits to simulated and observed dark-matter halos. Specifically, it fits the energy distribution, N(E), and the density profiles, including the central cusp. Here, we extend DARKexp N(E) to include the distribution in angular momentum, L^2, for spherically symmetric systems. First, we argue, based on theoretical, semi-analytical, and simulation results, that while dark-matter halos are relaxed in energy, they are not nearly as relaxed in angular momentum, which precludes using maximum entropy to uniquely derive N(E,L^2). Instead, we require that when integrating N(E,L^2) over squared angular momenta one retrieves the DARKexp N(E). Starting with a general expression for N(E,L^2) we show how the distribution of particles in L^2 is related to the shape of the velocity distribution function, VDF, and velocity anisotropy profile, \beta(r). We then demonstrate that astrophysically realistic halos, as judged by the VDF shape and \beta(r), must have linear or convex distributions in L^2, for each separate energy bin. The distribution in energy of the most bound particles must be nearly flat, and become more tilted in favor of radial orbits for less bound particles. These results are consistent with numerical simulations and represent an important step towards deriving the full distribution function for spherically symmetric dark-matter halos.
  • We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum luminosity is only about half as large as that of SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a GRB clearly associated with a massive star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be \Gamma ~ 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of \Gamma > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.