• Short-period binary star systems dissipate orbital energy through tidal interactions that lead to tighter, more circular orbits. When at least one star in a binary has evolved off of the main sequence, orbital circularization occurs for longer-period (~100 day) systems. Past work by (Verbunt & Phinney 1995) has shown that the orbital parameters and the circularization periods of a small sample of binary stars with evolved-star members can be understood within the context of standard tidal circularization theory. Using a sample of binaries with subgiant, giant, and red clump star members that is nearly an order of magnitude larger, we reexamine predictions for tidal circularization of binary stars with evolved members. We confirm that systems predicted by equilibrium-tide theory to have circular orbits generally have negligible measured eccentricities. The circularization period is correlated with the surface gravity (i.e. size) of the evolved member, indicating that the circularization timescale must be shorter than the evolutionary timescale along the giant branch. A few exceptions to the conclusions above are mentioned in the discussion: Some of these exceptions are likely systems in which the spectrum of the secondary biases the radial velocity measurements, but four appear to be genuine, short-period, moderate-eccentricity systems.
  • We revisit linear tidal excitation of spiral density waves in the disks of cataclysmic variables (CVs), focusing on scalings with orbital Mach number in order to bridge the gap between numerical simulations and real systems. If an inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) lies within the disk, ingoing waves are robustly excited, and the angular-momentum flux they carry is independent of Mach number. But in most CVs, the ILR lies outside the disk. The wave flux and its scaling with Mach number are then very sensitive to conditions near the disk edge. If the temperature and sound speed vanish there, excitation tends to be exponentially suppressed. If the Mach number remains finite in the outer parts but the radial and vertical density scale lengths become comparable due to subkeplerian rotation, resonance can occur with acoustic-cutoff and stratification frequencies. These previously neglected resonances excite waves, but the Mach-number scaling remains very steep if the radial scale length decreases gradually. The scaling can be less strong - algebraic rather than exponential - if there are sharp changes in surface density at finite sound speed. Shocks excited by streamline-crossing or by the impact of the stream from the companion are unlikely to be important for the angular-momentum budget, at least in quiescence. Our results may also apply to circumplanetary disks, where Mach numbers are likely lower than in CVs.
  • We investigate numerically the Princeton magneto-rotational instability (MRI) experiment and the effect of conducting axial boundaries or endcaps. MRI is identified and found to reach a much higher saturation than for insulating endcaps. This is probably due to stronger driving of the base flow by the magnetically rather than viscously coupled boundaries. Although the computations are necessarily limited to lower Reynolds numbers ($\Re$) than their experimental counterparts, it appears that the saturation level becomes independent of $\Re$ when $\Re$ is sufficiently large, whereas it has been found previously to decrease roughly as $\Re^{-1/4}$ with insulating endcaps. The much higher saturation levels will allow for the first positive detection of MRI beyond its theoretical and numerical predictions.
  • Global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is governed by disk angular momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a 1D model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on 1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfv\'en speed $v_{Ap}$, 2) the sound speed $c_s$ near the wind base, and 3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve $R^{-2}$ scaling). When $v_{Ap}\gg c_s$, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that well exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect $v_{Ap}$ to be comparable to $c_s$ at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with total wind mass loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.
  • We investigate the interaction of differential rotation and a misaligned magnetic field. The incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved numerically for a free-decay problem. In the kinematic limit, differential rotation annihilates the non-axisymmetric field on a timescale proportional to the cube root of magnetic Reynolds number ($Rm$), as predicted by R\"adler. Nonlinearly, the outcome depends upon the initial energy in the non-axisymmetric part of the field. Sufficiently weak fields approach axisymmetry as in the kinematic limit; some differential rotation survives across magnetic surfaces, at least on intermediate timescales. Stronger fields enforce uniform rotation and remain non-axisymmetric. The initial field strength that divides these two regimes does not follow the scaling $Rm^{-1/3}$ predicted by quasi-kinematic arguments, perhaps because our $Rm$ is never sufficiently large or because of reconnection. We discuss the possible relevance of these results to tidal synchronization and tidal heating of close binary stars, particularly double white dwarfs.
  • A fast and practical method is described for calculating the microlensed flux variance of an arbitrary source by uncorrelated stars. The required inputs are the mean convergence and shear due to the smoothed potential of the lensing galaxy, the stellar mass function, and the absolute square of the Fourier transform of the surface brightness in the source plane. The mathematical approach follows previous authors but has been generalized, streamlined, and implemented in publicly available code. Examples of its application are given for Dexter and Agol's inhomogeneous-disk models as well as the usual gaussian sources. Since the quantity calculated is a second moment of the magnification, it is only logarithmically sensitive to the sizes of very compact sources. However, for the inferred sizes of actual QSOs, it has some discriminatory power and may lend itself to simple statistical tests. At the very least, it should be useful for testing the convergence of microlensing simulations.
  • We propose a new method to conserve the total energy to round-off error in grid-based codes for hydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity. A formula for the energy flux due to the work done by the the self-gravitational force is given, so the change in total energy can be written in conservative form. Numerical experiments with the code Athena show that the total energy is indeed conserved with our new algorithm and the new algorithm is second order accurate. We have performed a set of tests that show the numerical errors in the traditional, non-conservative algorithm can affect the dynamics of the system. The new algorithm only requires one extra solution of the Poisson equation, as compared to the traditional algorithm which includes self-gravity as a source term. If the Poisson solver takes a negligible fraction of the total simulation time, such as when FFTs are used, the new algorithm is almost as efficient as the original method. This new algorithm is useful in Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity, especially when results are sensitive to small energy errors, as for radiation pressure dominated flow.
  • Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM), especially bosonic, has been considered a promising candidate to replace cold dark matter (CDM) as it resolves some of the problems associated with CDM. Here, we rule out the possibility that dark matter is a repulsive boson in thermal equilibrium. We develop the model first proposed by Goodman (2000) and derive the equation of state at finite temperature. Isothermal spherical halo models indicate a Bose-Einstein condensed core surrounded by a non-degenerate envelope, with an abrupt density drop marking the boundary between the two phases. Comparing this feature with observed rotation curves constrains the interaction strength of our model's DM particle, and Bullet Cluster measurements constrain the scattering cross section. Both ultimately can be cast as constraints on the particle's mass. We find these two constraints cannot be satisfied simultaneously in any realistic halo model---and hence dark matter cannot be a repulsive boson in thermal equilibrium. It is still left open that DM may be a repulsive boson provided it is not in thermal equilibrium; this requires that the mass of the particle be significantly less than a millivolt.
  • Context: Subcritical transition to turbulence has been proposed as a source of turbulent viscosity required for the associated angular momentum transport for fast accretion in Keplerian disks. Previously cited laboratory experiments in supporting this hypothesis were performed either in a different type of flow than Keplerian or without quantitative measurements of angular momentum transport and mean flow profile, and all of them appear to suffer from Ekman effects, secondary flows induced by nonoptimal axial boundary conditions. Such Ekman effects are expected to be absent from astronomical disks, which probably have stress-free vertical boundaries unless strongly magnetized. Aims: To quantify angular momentum transport due to subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence, if exists, in a quasi-Keplerian flow with minimized Ekman effects. Methods: We perform a local measurement of the azimuthal--radial component of the Reynolds stress tensor in a novel laboratory apparatus where Ekman effects are minimized by flexible control of axial boundary conditions. Results: We find significant Ekman effects on angular momentum transport due to nonoptimal axial boundary conditions in quasi-Keplerian flows. With the optimal control of Ekman effects, no statistically meaningful angular momentum transport is detected in such flows at Reynolds number up to two millions. Conclusions: Either a subcritical transition does not occur, or, if a subcritical transition does occur, the associated radial transport of angular momentum in optimized quasi-Keplerian laboratory flows is too small to directly support the hypothesis that subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence is responsible for accretion in astrophysical disks. Possible limitations in applying laboratory results to astrophysical disks due to experimental geometry are discussed.
  • We report on observations of a free-Shercliff-layer instability in a Taylor-Couette experiment using a liquid metal over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, $Re\sim 10^3-10^6$. The free Shercliff layer is formed by imposing a sufficiently strong axial magnetic field across a pair of differentially rotating axial endcap rings. This layer is destabilized by a hydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability, characterized by velocity fluctuations in the $r-\theta$ plane. The instability appears with an Elsasser number above unity, and saturates with an azimuthal mode number $m$ which increases with the Elsasser number. Measurements of the structure agree well with 2D global linear mode analyses and 3D global nonlinear simulations. These observations have implications for a range of rotating MHD systems in which similar shear layers may be produced.
  • In this paper, we investigate numerically the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in a cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow when an axial magnetic field is applied. To minimize Ekman recirculation due to vertical no-slip boundaries, two independently rotating rings are used at the vertical endcaps. This configuration reproduces setup used in laboratory experiments aiming to observe the MagnetoRotational Instability (MRI). Our 3D global simulations show that the nature of the bifurcation, the non-linear saturation, and the structure of axisymmetric MRI modes are significantly affected by the presence of boundaries. In addition, large scale non-axisymmetric modes are obtained when the applied field is sufficiently strong. We show that these modes are related to Kelvin-Helmoltz destabilization of a free Shercliff shear layer created by the combined action of the applied field and the rotating rings at the endcaps. Finally, we compare our numerical simulations to recent experimental results obtained in the Princeton MRI experiment.
  • We report 3D numerical simulations of the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in a spherical shell when a magnetic field is applied. Different spherical Couette configurations are investigated, by varying the rotation ratio between the inner and the outer sphere, the geometry of the imposed field, and the magnetic boundary conditions on the inner sphere. Either a Stewartson layer or a Shercliff layer, accompanied by a radial jet, can be generated depending on the rotation speeds and the magnetic field strength, and various non-axisymmetric destabilizations of the flow are observed. We show that instabilities arising from the presence of boundaries present striking similarities with the magnetorotational instability (MRI). To this end, we compare our numerical results to experimental observations of the Maryland experiment, who claimed to observe MRI in a similar setup.
  • A few examples are given of Chandra's work on statistical and stochastic problems that relate to open questions in astrophysics, in particular his theory of dynamical relaxation in systems with inverse-square interparticle forces. The roles of chaos and integrability in this theory require clarification, especially for systems having a dominant central mass. After this prelude, a hypothetical form of repulsive bosonic dark matter is discussed. The repulsion leads to nontrivial thermodynamic behavior, including superfluidity, and would tend to suppress dynamical friction, greatly reducing the drag exerted on rotating galactic bars. However, this form of dark matter can probably be ruled out, at least for parameters that allow halos to reach thermal equilibria within a Hubble time. One combination of the particle mass and interparticle repulsion determines the minimum core radius of dark halos. Bounds on dark-matter collisionality inferred from the Bullet Cluster constrain a second combination. It is possible to satisfy both constraints only for parameters that predict unacceptable rotation curves outside the halo core.
  • Using a version of the ZEUS code, we carry out two-dimensional simulations of self-gravitating shearing sheets, with application to QSO accretion disks at a few thousand Schwarzschild radii, corresponding to a few hundredths of a parsec for a 10^8 solar-mass black hole. Radiation pressure and optically thick radiative cooling are implemented via vertical averages. We determine dimensionless versions of the maximum surface density, accretion rate, and effective viscosity that can be sustained by density-wave turbulence without fragmentation. Where fragments do form, we study the final masses that result. The maximum Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter is approximately 0.4. Fragmentation occurs when the cooling time is less than about twice the shearing time, as found by Gammie and others, but can also occur at very long cooling times in sheets that are strongly radiation-pressure dominated. For accretion at the Eddington rate onto a 10^8 solar-mass black hole, fragmentation occurs beyond four thousand Schwarzschild radii, r_s. Near this radius, initial fragment masses are several hundred suns, consistent with estimates from linear stability; final masses after merging increase with the size of the sheet, reaching several thousand suns in our largest simulations. With increasing black-hole mass at a fixed Eddington ratio, self-gravity prevails to smaller multiples of r_s, where radiation pressure is more important and the cooling time is longer compared to the dynamical time; nevertheless, fragmentation can occur and produces larger initial fragment masses. We also find energy conservation is likely to be a challenge for all eulerian codes in self-gravitating regimes where radiation pressure dominates.
  • Many global circulation models predict supersonic zonal winds and large vertical shears in the atmospheres of short-period jovian exoplanets. Using linear analysis and nonlinear local simulations, we investigate hydrodynamic dissipation mechanisms to balance the thermal acceleration of these winds. The adiabatic Richardson criterion remains a good guide to linear stability, although thermal diffusion allows some modes to violate it at very long wavelengths and very low growth rates. Nonlinearly, wind speeds saturate at Mach numbers $\approx 2$ and Richardson numbers $\lesssim 1/4$ for a broad range of plausible diffusivities and forcing strengths. Turbulence and vertical mixing, though accompanied by weak shocks, dominate the dissipation, which appears to be the outcome of a recurrent Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. An explicit shear viscosity, as well as thermal diffusivity, is added to ZEUS to capture dissipation outside of shocks. The wind speed is not monotonic nor single valued for shear viscosities larger than about $10^{-3}$ of the sound speed times the pressure scale height. Coarsening the numerical resolution can also increase the speed. Hence global simulations that are incapable of representing vertical turbulence and shocks, either because of reduced physics or because of limited resolution, may overestimate wind speeds. We recommend that such simulations include artificial dissipation terms to control the Mach and Richardson numbers and to capture mechanical dissipation as heat.
  • Requirements for magnetic coupling and accretion in the active layer of a protostellar disk are re-examined, and some implications for thermal emission from the layer are discussed. The ionization and electrical conductivity are calculated following the general scheme of Ilgner and Nelson but with an updated UMIST database of chemical reactions and some improvements in the grain physics, and for the minimum-mass solar nebula rather than an alpha disk. The new limits on grain abundance are slightly more severe than theirs. Even for optimally sized grains, the layer should be at least marginally optically thin to its own thermal radiation, so that narrow, highly saturated emission lines of water and other molecular species would be expected if accretion is driven by turbulence and standard rates of ionization prevail. If the grain size distribution extends broadly from well below a micron to a millimeter or more, as suggested by observations, then the layer may be so optically thin that its cooling is dominated by molecular emission. Even under such conditions, it is difficult to have active layers of more than 10g/cm^2 near 1AU unless dust is entirely eliminated or greatly enhanced ionization rates are assumed. Equipartition-strength magnetic fields are then required in these regions of the disk if observed accretion rates are driven by magnetorotational turbulence. Wind-driven accretion might allow weaker fields and less massive active layers but would not heat the layer as much as turbulence and therefore might not produce emission lines.
  • We investigate the stability of incompressible, exact, non-ideal magnetorotational (MRI) modes against parasitic instabilities. Both Kelvin-Helmholtz and tearing-mode parasitic instabilities may occur in the dissipative regimes accessible to current numerical simulations. We suppose that a primary MRI mode saturates at an amplitude such that its fastest parasite has a growth rate comparable to its own. The predicted alpha parameter then depends critically on whether the fastest primary and parasitic modes fit within the computational domain and whether non-axisymmetric parasitic modes are allowed. Hence even simulations that resolve viscous and resistive scales may not saturate properly unless the numerical domain is large enough to allow the free evolution of both MRI and parasitic modes. To minimally satisfy these requirements in simulations with vertical background fields, the vertical extent of the domain should accommodate the fastest growing MRI mode while the radial and azimuthal extents must be twice as large. The fastest parasites have horizontal wavelengths roughly twice as long as the vertical wavelength of the primary.
  • The major questions relevant to star and planet formation are: What controls the rate, efficiency, spatial clustering, multiplicity, and initial mass function of star formation, now and in the past? What are the major feedback mechanisms through which star formation affects its environment? What controls the formation and orbital parameters of planets, especially terrestrial planets? These questions cannot be fully addressed without understanding key magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and plasma physics processes. Although some of these basic problems have long been considered intractable, attacking them through a combination of laboratory experiment, theory, and numerical simulation is now feasible, and would be fruitful. Achieving a better understanding of these processes is critical to interpreting observations, and will form an important component of astrophysical models. These models in turn will serve as inputs to other areas of astrophysics, e.g. cosmology and galaxy formation.
  • By analogy with a mechanism proposed by Gold and Soter to explain the retrograde rotation of Venus, Arras and Socrates suggest that thermal tides may excite hot jovian exoplanets into nonsynchronous rotation, and perhaps also noncircular orbits. It is shown here that because of the absence of a solid surface above the convective core of a jovian planet, the coupling of the gravitational and thermal tides vanishes to zeroth order in the ratio of the atmospheric scale height to the planetary radius. At the next order, the effect probably has the sign opposite to that claimed by the latter authors, hence reinforcing synchronous and circular orbits.
  • Tidal dissipation may be important for the internal evolution as well as the orbits of short-period massive planets--hot Jupiters. We revisit a mechanism proposed by Ogilvie and Lin for tidal forcing of inertial waves, which are short-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances restored primarily by Coriolis rather than buoyancy forces. This mechanism is of particular interest for hot Jupiters because it relies upon a rocky core, and because these bodies are otherwise largely convective. Compared to waves excited at the base of the stratified, externally heated atmosphere, waves excited at the core are more likely to deposit heat in the convective region and thereby affect the planetary radius. However, Ogilvie and Lin's results were numerical, and the manner of the wave excitation was not clear. Using WKB methods, we demonstrate the production of short waves by scattering of the equilibrium tide off the core at critical latitudes. The tidal dissipation rate associated with these waves scales as the fifth power of the core radius, and the implied tidal $Q$ is of order ten million for nominal values of the planet's mass, radius, orbital period, and core size. We comment upon an alternative proposal by Wu for exciting inertial waves in an unstratified fluid body by means of compressibility rather than a core. We also find that even a core of rock is unlikely to be rigid. But Ogilvie and Lin's mechanism should still operate if the core is substantially denser than its immediate surroundings.
  • We present a physics-based statistical theory of a force-free magnetic field in the corona above a turbulent accretion disk. The field is represented by a statistical ensemble of loops tied to the disk. Each loop evolves under several physical processes: Keplerian shear, turbulent random walk of the disk footpoints, and reconnection with other loops. To build a statistical description, we introduce the distribution function of loops over their sizes and construct a kinetic equation that governs its evolution. This loop kinetic equation is formally analogous to Boltzmann's kinetic equation, with loop-loop reconnection described by a binary collision integral. A dimensionless parameter is introduced to scale the (unknown) overall rate of reconnection relative to Keplerian shear. After solving for the loop distribution function numerically, we calculate self-consistently the distribution of the mean magnetic pressure and dissipation rate with height, and the equilibrium shapes of loops of different sizes. We also compute the energy and torque associated with a given loop, as well as the total magnetic energy and torque in the corona. We explore the dependence of these quantities on the reconnection parameter and find that they can be greatly enhanced if reconnection between loops is suppressed.
  • We investigate numerically a traveling wave pattern observed in experimental magnetized Taylor-Couette flow at low magnetic Reynolds number. By accurately modeling viscous and magnetic boundaries in all directions, we reproduce the experimentally measured wave patterns and their amplitudes. Contrary to previous claims, the waves are shown to be transiently amplified disturbances launched by viscous boundary layers rather than globally unstable magnetorotational modes.
  • Geometrical shock dynamics, also called CCW theory, yields approximate equations for shock propagation in which only the conditions at the shock appear explicitly; the post-shock flow is presumed approximately uniform and enters implicitly via a Riemann invariant. The nonrelativistic theory, formulated by G. B. Whitham and others, matches many experimental results surprisingly well. Motivated by astrophysical applications, we adapt the theory to ultra-relativistic shocks advancing into an ideal fluid whose pressure is negligible ahead of the shock, but one third of its proper energy density behind the shock. Exact results are recovered for some self-similar cylindrical and spherical shocks with power-law pre-shock density profiles. Comparison is made with numerical solutions of the full hydrodynamic equations. We review relativistic vorticity and circulation. In an ultrarelativistic ideal fluid, circulation can be defined so that it changes only at shocks, notwithstanding entropy gradients in smooth parts of the flow.
  • Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are believed to require magnetic fields much stronger than that of the compressed pre-shock medium. As an alternative to microscopic plasma instabilities, we propose amplification of the field by macroscopic turbulence excited by the interaction of the shock with a clumpy pre-shock medium, for example a stellar wind. Using a recently developed formalism for localized perturbations to an ultra-relativistic shock, we derive constraints on the lengthscale, amplitude, and volume filling factor of density clumps required to produce a given magnetic energy fraction within the expansion time of the shock, assuming that the energy in the field achieves equipartion with the turbulence. Stronger and smaller-scale inhomogeneities are required for larger shock Lorentz factors. Hence it is likely that the magnetic energy fraction evolves as the shock slows. This could be detected by monitoring the synchrotron cooling frequency if the radial density profile ahead of the shock, smoothed over clumps, is known.
  • The most efficient energy sources known in the Universe are accretion disks. Those around black holes convert 5 -- 40 per cent of rest-mass energy to radiation. Like water circling a drain, inflowing mass must lose angular momentum, presumably by vigorous turbulence in disks, which are essentially inviscid. The origin of the turbulence is unclear. Hot disks of electrically conducting plasma can become turbulent by way of the linear magnetorotational instability. Cool disks, such as the planet-forming disks of protostars, may be too poorly ionized for the magnetorotational instability to occur, hence essentially unmagnetized and linearly stable. Nonlinear hydrodynamic instability often occurs in linearly stable flows (for example, pipe flows) at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers. Although planet-forming disks have extreme Reynolds numbers, Keplerian rotation enhances their linear hydrodynamic stability, so the question of whether they can be turbulent and thereby transport angular momentum effectively is controversial. Here we report a laboratory experiment, demonstrating that non-magnetic quasi-Keplerian flows at Reynolds numbers up to millions are essentially steady. Scaled to accretion disks, rates of angular momentum transport lie far below astrophysical requirements. By ruling out purely hydrodynamic turbulence, our results indirectly support the magnetorotational instability as the likely cause of turbulence, even in cool disks.