• Context. Differential rotation has a strong influence on stellar internal dynamics and evolution, notably by triggering hydrodynamical instabilities, by interacting with the magnetic field, and more generally by inducing transport of angular momentum and chemical elements. Moreover, it modifies the way waves propagate in stellar interiors and thus the frequency spectrum of these waves, the regions they probe, and the transport they generate. Aims. We investigate the impact of a general differential rotation (both in radius and latitude) on the propagation of axisymmetric gravito-inertial waves. Methods. We use a small-wavelength approximation to obtain a local dispersion relation for these waves. We then describe the propagation of waves thanks to a ray model that follows a Hamiltonian formalism. Finally, we numerically probe the properties of these gravito-inertial rays for different regimes of radial and latitudinal differential rotation. Results. We derive a local dispersion relation that includes the effect of a general differential rotation. Subsequently, considering a polytropic stellar model, we observe that differential rotation allows for a large variety of resonant cavities that can be probed by gravito-inertial waves. We identify that for some regimes of frequency and differential rotation, the properties of gravito-inertial rays are similar to those found in the uniformly rotating case. Furthermore, we also find new regimes specific to differential rotation, where the dynamics of rays is chaotic. Conclusions. As a consequence, we expect modes to follow the same trend. Some parts of oscillation spectra corresponding to regimes similar to those of the uniformly rotating case would exhibit regular patterns, while parts corresponding to the new regimes would be mostly constituted of chaotic modes with a spectrum rather characterised by a generic statistical distribution.
  • Stars are changing entities in a constant evolution during their lives. At non-secular time scales (from seconds to years) the effect of dynamical processes such as convection, rotation, and magnetic fields can modify the stellar oscillations. Convection excites acoustic modes in solar-like stars, while rotation and magnetic fields can perturb the oscillation frequencies lifting the degeneracy in the azimuthal component m of the eigenfrequencies. Moreover, the interaction between rotation, convection, and magnetic fields can produce magnetic dynamos, which sometimes yield to regular magnetic activity cycles. In this chapter we review how stellar dynamics can be studied and explain what long-term seismic observations can bring to the understanding of this field. Thus, we show how we can study some properties of the convective time scales operating in a star like the Sun. We also compare the stratified information we can obtain on the internal (radial) differential rotation from main sequence solar-like stars, to the Sun, and to more evolved sub giants, and giants. We complement this information on the internal rotation with the determination of the surface (latitudinal differential) rotation obtained directly from the light curves. Indeed, when stars are active there can be spots on their surfaces dimming the light emitted. When the star rotates, the emitted light will be modulated by the presence of these spots with a period corresponding to the rotation rate at the active latitudes (where the spots develop). We conclude this chapter by discussing the seismology of fast rotating stars and, from a theoretical point of view, what are the current challenges to infer properties of the internal structure and dynamics of intermediate- and high-mass stars.
  • Context. As of today, asteroseismology mainly allows us to probe the internal rotation of stars when modes are only weakly affected by rotation using perturbative methods. Such methods cannot be applied to rapidly rotating stars, which exhibit complex oscillation spectra. In this context, the so-called traditional approximation, which neglects the terms associated with the latitudinal component of the rotation vector, describes modes that are strongly affected by rotation. This approximation is sometimes used for interpreting asteroseismic data, however, its domain of validity is not established yet. Aims. We aim at deriving analytical prescriptions for period spacings of low-frequency gravity modes strongly affected by rotation through the full Coriolis acceleration, which can be used to probe stellar internal structure and rotation. Methods. We approximated the asymptotic theory of gravito-inertial waves in uniformly rotating stars using ray theory described in a previous paper in the low-frequency regime, where waves are trapped near the equatorial plane. We put the equations of ray dynamics into a separable form and used the EBK quantisation method to compute modes frequencies from rays. Results. Two spectral patterns that depend on stratification and rotation are predicted within this new approximation: one for axisymmetric modes and one for non-axisymmetric modes. Conclusions. The detection of the predicted patterns in observed oscillation spectra would give constraints on internal rotation and chemical stratification of rapidly rotating stars exhibiting gravity modes, such as $\gamma$ Doradus, SPB, or Be stars. The obtained results have a mathematical form that is similar to that of the traditional approximation, but the new approximation takes the full Coriolis, which allows for propagation near the centre, and centrifugal accelerations into account.
  • Most of the information we have about the internal rotation of stars comes from modes that are weakly affected by rotation, for example by using rotational splittings. In contrast, we present here a method, based on the asymptotic theory of Prat et al. (2016), which allows us to analyse the signature of rotation where its effect is the most important, that is in low-frequency gravity modes that are strongly affected by rotation. For such modes, we predict two spectral patterns that could be confronted to observed spectra and those computed using fully two-dimensional oscillation codes.
  • The gravito-inertial waves propagating over a shellular baroclinic flow inside a rotating spherical shell are analysed using the Boussinesq approximation. The wave properties are examined by computing paths of characteristics in the non-dissipative limit, and by solving the full dissipative eigenvalue problem using a high-resolution spectral method. Gravito-inertial waves are found to obey a mixed-type second-order operator and to be often focused around short-period attractors of characteristics or trapped in a wedge formed by turning surfaces and boundaries. We also find eigenmodes that show a weak dependence with respect to viscosity and heat diffusion just like truly regular modes. Some axisymmetric modes are found unstable and likely destabilized by baroclinic instabilities. Similarly, some non-axisymmetric modes that meet a critical layer (or corotation resonance) can turn unstable at sufficiently low diffusivities. In all cases, the instability is driven by the differential rotation. For many modes of the spectrum, neat power laws are found for the dependence of the damping rates with diffusion coefficients, but the theoretical explanation for the exponent values remains elusive in general. The eigenvalue spectrum turns out to be very rich and complex, which lets us suppose an even richer and more complex spectrum for rotating stars or planets that own a differential rotation driven by baroclinicity.
  • Context. The seismology of early-type stars is limited by our incomplete understanding of gravito-inertial modes. Aims. We develop a short-wavelength asymptotic analysis for gravito-inertial modes in rotating stars. Methods. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation was applied to the equations governing adiabatic small perturbations about a model of a uniformly rotating barotropic star. Results. A general eikonal equation, including the effect of the centrifugal deformation, is derived. The dynamics of axisymmetric gravito-inertial rays is solved numerically for polytropic stellar models of increasing rotation and analysed by describing the structure of the phase space. Three different types of phase-space structures are distinguished. The first type results from the continuous evolution of structures of the non-rotating integrable phase space. It is predominant in the low-frequency part of the phase space. The second type of structures are island chains associated with stable periodic rays. The third type of structures are large chaotic regions that can be related to the envelope minimum of the Brunt-V\"ais\"al\"a frequency. Conclusions. Gravito-inertial modes are expected to follow this classification, in which the frequency spectrum is a superposition of sub-spectra associated with these different types of phase-space structures. The detailed confrontation between the predictions of this ray-based asymptotic theory and numerically computed modes will be presented in a companion paper.
  • While many intermediate- and high-mass main sequence stars are rapidly and differentially rotating, the effects of rotation on oscillation modes are poorly known. In this communication we present a first study of axisymmetric gravito-inertial modes in the radiative zone of a differentially rotating star. We consider a simplified model where the radiative zone of the star is a linearly stratified rotating fluid within a spherical shell, with differential rotation due to baroclinic effects. We solve the eigenvalue problem with high-resolution spectral computations and determine the propagation domain of the waves through the theory of characteristics. We explore the propagation properties of two kinds of modes: those that can propagate in the entire shell and those that are restricted to a subdomain. Some of the modes that we find concentrate kinetic energy around short-period shear layers known as attractors. We describe various geometries for the propagation domains, conditioning the surface visibility of the corresponding modes.
  • In asteroseismology, the observed time series often suffers from incomplete time coverage due to gaps. The presence of periodic gaps may generate spurious peaks in the power spectrum that limit the analysis of the data. Various methods have been developed to deal with gaps in time series data. However, it is still important to improve these methods to be able to extract all the possible information contained in the data. In this paper, we propose a new approach to handle the problem, the so-called inpainting method. This technique, based on a sparsity prior, enables to judiciously fill-in the gaps in the data, preserving the asteroseismic signal, as far as possible. The impact of the observational window function is reduced and the interpretation of the power spectrum is simplified. This method is applied both on ground and space-based data. It appears that the inpainting technique improves the oscillation modes detection and estimation. Additionally, it can be used to study very long time series of many stars because its computation is very fast. For a time series of 50 days of CoRoT-like data, it allows a speed-up factor of 1000, if compared to methods of the same accuracy.
  • Oscillations have been detected in a variety of stars, including intermediate- and high-mass main sequence stars. While many of these stars are rapidly and differentially rotating, the effects of rotation on oscillation modes are poorly known. In this communication we present a first study on axisymmetric gravito-inertial modes in the radiative zone of a differentially rotating star. These modes probe the deep layers of the star around its convective core. We consider a simplified model where the radiative zone of a star is a linearly stratified rotating fluid within a spherical shell, with differential rotation due to baroclinic effects. We solve the eigenvalue problem with high-resolution spectral simulations and determine the propagation domain of the waves through the theory of characteristics. We explore the propagation properties of two kinds of modes: those that can propagate in the entire shell and those that are restricted to a subdomain. Some of the modes that we find concentrate kinetic energy around short-period shear layers known as attractors. We characterise these attractors by the dependence of their Lyapunov exponent with the \BV frequency of the background and the oscillation frequency of the mode. Finally, we note that, as modes associated with short-period attractors form dissipative structures, they could play an important role for tidal interactions but should be dismissed in the interpretation of observed oscillation frequencies.
  • Many early-type stars have been measured with high angular velocities. In such stars, mode identification is difficult as the effects of fast and differential rotation are not well known. Using fundamental parameters measured by interferometry, the ESTER structure code and the TOP oscillation code, we investigate the oscillation spectrum of Rasalhague (alpha Ophiuchi), for which observations by the MOST satellite found 57 oscillations frequencies. Results do not show a clear identification of the modes and highlight the difficulties of asteroseismology for such stars with a very complex oscillation spectrum.
  • Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85 (+0.52,-0.42) M_Jupiter, which implies that it is a planet, not a brown dwarf.
  • Stellar models generally use simple parametrizations to treat convection. The most widely used parametrization is the so-called "Mixing Length Theory" where the convective eddy sizes are described using a single number, \alpha, the mixing-length parameter. This is a free parameter, and the general practice is to calibrate \alpha using the known properties of the Sun and apply that to all stars. Using data from NASA's Kepler mission we show that using the solar-calibrated \alpha is not always appropriate, and that in many cases it would lead to estimates of initial helium abundances that are lower than the primordial helium abundance. Kepler data allow us to calibrate \alpha for many other stars and we show that for the sample of stars we have studied, the mixing-length parameter is generally lower than the solar value. We studied the correlation between \alpha and stellar properties, and we find that \alpha increases with metallicity. We therefore conclude that results obtained by fitting stellar models or by using population-synthesis models constructed with solar values of \alpha are likely to have large systematic errors. Our results also confirm theoretical expectations that the mixing-length parameter should vary with stellar properties.
  • Photometric observations made by the NASA Kepler Mission have led to a dramatic increase in the number of main-sequence and subgiant stars with detected solar-like oscillations. We present an ensemble asteroseismic analysis of 76 solar-type stars. Using frequencies determined from the Kepler time-series photometry, we have measured three asteroseismic parameters that characterize the oscillations: the large frequency separation (\Delta \nu), the small frequency separation between modes of l=0 and l=2 (\delta \nu_02), and the dimensionless offset (\epsilon). These measurements allow us to construct asteroseismic diagrams, namely the so-called C-D diagram of \delta \nu_02 versus \Delta \nu, and the recently re-introduced {\epsilon} diagram. We compare the Kepler results with previously observed solar-type stars and with theoretical models. The positions of stars in these diagrams places constraints on their masses and ages. Additionally, we confirm the observational relationship between {\epsilon} and T_eff that allows for the unambiguous determination of radial order and should help resolve the problem of mode identification in F stars.
  • We present initial results on some of the properties of open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 derived from asteroseismic data obtained by NASA's Kepler mission. In addition to estimating the mass, radius and log g of stars on the red-giant branch of these clusters, we estimate the distance to the clusters and their ages. Our model-independent estimate of the distance modulus of NGC 6791 is (m-M)_0= 13.11\pm 0.06. We find (m-M)_0= 11.85\pm 0.05 for NGC 6819. The average mass of stars on the red-giant branch of NGC 6791 is 1.20 \pm 0.01 M_sun, while that of NGC 6819 is 1.68\pm 0.03M_sun. It should be noted that we do not have data that cover the entire red-giant branch and the actual mass will be somewhat lower. We have determined model-dependent estimates of ages of these clusters. We find ages between 6.8 and 8.6 Gyr for NGC 6791, however, most sets of models give ages around 7Gyr. We obtain ages between 2 and 2.4 Gyr for NGC 6819.
  • We analyze more than 5000 days of high-quality Sun-as-a-star, radial velocity GOLF and photometric VIRGO/SPM helioseismic observations to extract precise estimates of the visibilities of the low-degree p modes and the m-height ratios of the l=2 and 3 multiplets in the solar acoustic spectrum. The mode visibilities are shown to be larger during the GOLF red-wing configuration than during the blue-wing configuration, and to decrease as the wavelength of the VIRGO/SPM channels increases. We also show that the mode visibilities are independent of the solar activity cycle and remain constant overall with time, but that nevertheless they follow short-term fluctuations on a time scale of a few months. The l=1 mode visibility also increases significantly toward the end of the year 1999. Comparisons with theoretical predictions are provided. Even though there is qualitative agreement, some significant discrepancies appear, especially for the l=3 modes. The limb darkening alone cannot explain the relative visibilities of modes. These precise estimates should be used as references for the extraction of the p-mode parameters for any future investigation using the GOLF and VIRGO/SPM observations.
  • We analyze more than 5000 days of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity GOLF and intensity VIRGO observations to measure the visibilities of the l=0, 1, 2, and 3 modes and the m-amplitude ratios of the l=2 and 3 modes in the solar acoustic spectrum. We provide observational values that we compare to theoretical predictions.
  • It is well known that in the Sun, the frequencies and amplitudes of acoustic modes vary throughout the solar cycle. Indeed, while the magnetic activity goes towards its maximum, the frequencies of the modes increase and their amplitudes decrease. We have analyzed data from the CoRoT mission on a few stars that exhibit solar-like oscillations. The study of HD49933 (observed during 60 days and 137 days spanning a total of 400 days) showed a modulation of the maximum amplitude per radial mode and the frequency shifts of the modes, showing magnetic activity in this rapidly rotating star. Moreover, both properties vary in an anticorrelated way and the data allowed us to establish a lower limit for the activity-cycle period of ~120 days. Measurements in Ca H and K lines confirmed that this star is in the "active stars" category. We will also discuss the results obtained for other targets such as HD181420 and HD49835 for which we have investigated a similar behavior.
  • The 11-year activity cycle of the Sun is a consequence of a dynamo process occurring beneath its surface. We analyzed photometric data obtained by the CoRoT space mission, showing solar-like oscillations in the star HD49933, for signatures of stellar magnetic activity. Asteroseismic measurements of global changes in the oscillation frequencies and mode amplitudes reveal a modulation of at least 120 days, with the minimum frequency shift corresponding to maximum amplitude as in the Sun. These observations are evidence of a stellar magnetic activity cycle taking place beneath the surface of HD49933 and provide constraints for stellar dynamo models under conditions different from those of the Sun.
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.
  • We present the results of three-dimensional simulations of the deep convective envelope of a young (10 Myr) one-solar-mass star, obtained with the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic code. Since young stars are known to be faster rotators than their main sequence counterparts, we have systematically studied the impact of the stellar rotation speed, by considering stars spinning up to five times as fast as the Sun. The aim of these nonlinear models is to understand the complex interactions between convection and rotation. We discuss the influence of the turbulence level and of the rotation rate on the intensity and the topology of the mean flows. For all of the computed models, we find a solar-type superficial differential rotation, with an equatorial acceleration, and meridional circulation that exhibits a multicellular structure. Even if the differential rotation contrast decreases only marginally for high rotation rates, the meridional circulation intensity clearly weakens according to our simulations. We have also shown that, for Taylor numbers above a certain threshold (Ta>10^9), the convection can develop a vacillating behavior. Since simulations with high turbulence levels and rotation rates exhibit strongly cylindrical internal rotation profiles, we have considered the influence of baroclinic effects at the base of the convective envelope of these young Suns, to see whether such effect can modify the otherwise near cylindrical profiles to produce more conical, solar-like profiles.
  • The GOLFNG (Global Oscillations at Low Frequency New Generation) instrument is devoted to the search for solar gravity and acoustic modes, and also chromospheric modes from space. This instrument which is a successor to GOLF/SOHO will contribute to improve our knowledge of the dynamics of the solar radiative zone. It is a 15 points resonant scattering spectrometer, working on the D1 sodium line. A ground-based prototype is under construction to validate the difficult issues. It will be installed at the Teide Observatory, on Tenerife in 2006 to analyse the separation of the effects of the magnetic turbulence of the line from the solar oscillations. We are prepared to put a space version of this instrument including a capability of identification of the modes, in orbit during the next decade. This instrument should be included in the ILWS program as it offers a key to the improvement of our knowledge of the solar core in combination with observations from SDO and PICARD. We hope to determine the core rotation and magnetic field, through precise measurements of oscillation mode frequency splittings. Understanding the magnetic field of the radiative zone is important for progress in the study of solar activity sources, an important player for the long-term Sun-Earth relationship.