• We present the first long-duration and high duty cycle 40-tesla pulsed-field cryomagnet addressed to single crystal neutron diffraction experiments at temperatures down to 2 K. The magnet produces a horizontal field in a bi-conical geometry, $\pm$15 and $\pm$30{\deg} upstream and downstream of the sample, respectively. Using a 1.15MJ mobile generator, magnetic field pulses of 100 ms length are generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 23 ms and a repetition rate of 6-7 pulses per hour at 40 T. The setup was validated for neutron diffraction on the CEA-CRG three-axis spectrometer IN22 at the ILL.
  • Various fundamental-physics experiments such as measurement of the birefringence of the vacuum, searches for ultralight dark matter (e.g., axions), and precision spectroscopy of complex systems (including exotic atoms containing antimatter constituents) are enabled by high-field magnets. We give an overview of current and future experiments and discuss the state-of-the-art DC- and pulsed-magnet technologies and prospects for future developments.
  • We present a new technique to measure pulsed magnetic fields based on the use of Rubidium in gas phase as a metrological standard. We have therefore developed an instrument based on laser inducing transitions at about 780~nm (D2 line) in a Rubidium gas contained in a mini-cell of 3~mm~x~3~mm cross section. To be able to insert such a cell in a standard high field pulsed magnet we have realized a fibred probe kept at a fixed temperature. Transition frequencies for both the $\pi$ (light polarization parallel to the magnetic field) and $\sigma$ (light polarization perpendicular to the magnetic field) configurations are measured by a commercial wavemeter. One innovation of our sensor is that in addition of monitoring the light transmitted by the Rb cell, which is usual, we also monitor the fluorescence emission of the gas sample from a very small volume with the advantage of reducing the impact of the field inhomogeneity on the field measurement. Our sensor has been tested up to about 58~T.
  • The consensus, according to which the transmission of sound from the tympanum to the Outer Hair Cells is solely mechanical, is problematic, especially with respect to high pitched sounds. We demonstrate that the collagenous fibers of the tympanum produce electric potentials synchronous to acoustic vibrations and that, contrary to expectations, their amplitude increases as the frequency of the vibration increases. These electrical potentials cannot be reduced to the cochlear microphonic. Moreover, the alteration of collagen as well as that of the gap junctions (electric synapses) necessary for the transmission of the electric potentials to the complex formed by the Deiters Cells and Outer Hair Cells, results in hypoacousis or deafness. The discovery of an electronic pathway, complementary to air and bone conduction has the potential for elucidating certain important as yet unexplained aspects of hearing with respect to cochlear amplification, otoacoustic emissions, and hypoacusis related to the deterioration of collagen or of gap-junctions. Thus, our findings have important implications for both theory and practice.
  • The metallic state of the underdoped high-Tc cuprates has remained an enigma: How may seemingly disconnected Fermi surface segments, observed in zero magnetic field as a result of the opening of a partial gap (the pseudogap), possess conventional quasiparticle properties? How do the small Fermi-surface pockets evidenced by the observation of quantum oscillations (QO) emerge as superconductivity is suppressed in high magnetic fields? Such QO, discovered in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.5 (Y123) and YBa2Cu4O8 (Y124), signify the existence of a conventional Fermi surface (FS). However, due to the complexity of the crystal structures of Y123 and Y124 (CuO2 double-layers, CuO chains, low structural symmetry), it has remained unclear if the QO are specific to this particular family of cuprates. Numerous theoretical proposals have been put forward to explain the route toward QO, including materials-specific scenarios involving CuO chains and scenarios involving the quintessential CuO2 planes. Here we report the observation of QO in underdoped HgBa2CuO4+{\delta} (Hg1201), a model cuprate superconductor with individual CuO2 layers, high tetragonal symmetry, and no CuO chains. This observation proves that QO are a universal property of the underdoped CuO2 planes, and it opens the door to quantitative future studies of the metallic state and of the Fermi-surface reconstruction phenomenon in this structurally simplest cuprate.
  • The pressure dependence of the interlayer magnetoresistance of the quasi-two dimensional organic metal beta''-(BEDT-TTF)4(NH4)[Fe(C2O4)3].DMF has been investigated up to 1 GPa in pulsed magnetic fields up to 55 T. The Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations spectra can be interpreted on the basis of three compensated orbits in all the pressure range studied, suggesting that the Fermi surface topology remains qualitatively the same as the applied pressure varies. In addition, all the observed frequencies, normalized to their value at ambient pressure, exhibit the same sizeable pressure dependence. Despite this behavior, which is at variance with that of numerous charge transfer salts based on the BEDT-TTF molecule, non-monotonous pressure-induced variations of parameters such as the scattering rate linked to the various detected orbits are observed.