• Capillary and van der Waals forces cause nanotubes to deform or even collapse under metal contacts. Using ab-initio bandstructure calculations, we find that these deformations reduce the bandgap by as much as 30\%, while fully collapsed nanotubes become metallic. Moreover degeneracy lifting, due to the broken axial symmetry and wavefunctions mismatch between the fully collapsed and the round portions of a CNT, leads to a three times higher contact resistance. The latter we demonstrate by contact resistance calculations within the tight-binding approach.
  • Carbon nanotubes provide a rare access point into the plasmon physics of one-dimensional electronic systems. By assembling purified nanotubes into uniformly sized arrays, we show that they support coherent plasmon resonances, that these plasmons enhance and hybridize with phonons, and that the phonon-plasmon resonances have quality factors as high as 10. Because coherent nanotube plasmonics can strengthen light-matter interactions, it provides a compelling platform for surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy and tunable, high-performance optical devices at the nanometer scale.
  • Semiconductor heterostructures are fundamental building blocks for many important device applications. The emergence of two-dimensional semiconductors opens up a new realm for creating heterostructures. As the bandgaps of transition metal dichalcogenides thin films have sensitive layer dependence, it is natural to create lateral heterojunctions using the same materials with different thicknesses. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show the real space image of electronic structures across the bilayer-monolayer interface in MoSe2 and WSe2. Most bilayer-monolayer heterojunctions are found to have a zigzag-orientated interface, and the band alignment of such atomically sharp heterojunctions is of type-I with a well-defined interface mode which acts as a narrower-gap quantum wire. The ability to utilize such commonly existing thickness terrace as lateral heterojunctions is a crucial addition to the tool set for device applications based on atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides, with the advantage of easy and flexible implementation.
  • For carbon nanotube transistors, as for graphene, the electrical contacts are a key factor limiting device performance. We calculate the device characteristics as a function of nanotube diameter and metal workfunction. Although the on-state current varies continuously, the transfer characteristics reveal a relatively abrupt crossover from Schottky to ohmic contacts. We find that typical high-performance devices fall surprisingly close to the crossover. Surprisingly, tunneling plays an important role even in this regime, so that current fails to saturate with gate voltage as was expected due to "source exhaustion".
  • Wrinkling is a ubiquitous phenomenon in two-dimensional membranes. In particular, in the large-scale growth of graphene on metallic substrates, high densities of wrinkles are commonly observed. Despite their prevalence and potential impact on large-scale graphene electronics, relatively little is known about their structural morphology and electronic properties. Surveying the graphene landscape using atomic force microscopy, we found that wrinkles reach a certain maximum height before folding over. Calculations of the energetics explain the morphological transition, and indicate that the tall ripples are collapsed into narrow standing wrinkles by van der Waals forces, analogous to large-diameter nanotubes. Quantum transport calculations show that conductance through these collapsed wrinkle structures is limited mainly by a density-of-states bottleneck and by interlayer tunneling across the collapsed bilayer region. Also through systematic measurements across large numbers of devices with wide folded wrinkles, we find a distinct anisotropy in their electrical resistivity, consistent with our transport simulations. These results highlight the coupling between morphology and electronic properties, which has important practical implications for large-scale high-speed graphene electronics.
  • The electrical properties of graphene depend sensitively on the substrate. For example, recent measurements of epitaxial graphene on SiC show resistance arising from steps on the substrate. Here we calculate the deformation of graphene at substrate steps, and the resulting electrical resistance, over a wide range of step heights. The elastic deformations contribute only a very small resistance at the step. However, for graphene on SiC(0001) there is strong substrate-induced doping, and this is substantially reduced on the lower side of the step where graphene pulls away from the substrate. The resulting resistance explains the experimental measurements.