• We report the discovery of an extremely red planetary-mass companion to 2MASS J22362452+4751425, a $\approx$0.6 $M_{\odot}$ late-K dwarf likely belonging to the $\sim$120 Myr AB Doradus moving group. 2M2236+4751 b was identified in multi-epoch NIRC2 adaptive optics imaging at Keck Observatory at a separation of 3.7$"$, or 230 $\pm$ 20 AU in projection at the kinematic distance of 63 $\pm$ 5 pc to its host star. Assuming membership in the AB Dor group, as suggested from its kinematics, the inferred mass of 2M2236+4751 b is 11-14 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$. Follow-up Keck/OSIRIS $K$-band spectroscopy of the companion reveals strong CO absorption similar to other faint red L dwarfs and lacks signs of methane absorption despite having an effective temperature of $\approx$900-1200 K. With a ($J$-$K$)$_\mathrm{MKO}$ color of 2.69 $\pm$ 0.12 mag, the near-infrared slope of 2M2236+4751 b is redder than all of the HR 8799 planets and instead resembles the $\approx$23 Myr isolated planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22, implying that similarly thick photospheric clouds can persist in the atmospheres of giant planets at ages beyond 100 Myr. In near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams, 2M2236+4751 b is located at the tip of the red L dwarf sequence and appears to define the "elbow" of the AB Dor substellar isochrone separating low-gravity L dwarfs from the cooler young T dwarf track. 2M2236+4751 b is the reddest substellar companion to a star and will be a valuable benchmark to study the shared atmospheric properties of young low-mass brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.
  • We present the integration status for `imaka, the ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system on the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. This wide-field GLAO pathfinder system exploits Maunakea's highly confined ground layer and weak free-atmosphere to push the corrected field of view to ~1/3 of a degree, an areal field approaching an order of magnitude larger than any existing or planned GLAO system, with a FWHM ~ 0.33 arcseconds in the visible and near infrared. We discuss the unique design aspects of the instrument, the driving science cases and how they impact the system, and how we will demonstrate these cases on the sky.
  • We report the first detection of the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster - a young (~2 Myr), massive (~10,000 Solar Mass) starburst cluster located near the Galactic center. This was accomplished using proper motion measurements within the central region of the cluster, obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Keck Observatory over a 3 year time baseline (2006-2009). This uniform dataset results in proper motion measurements that are improved by a factor ~5 over previous measurements from heterogeneous instruments, yielding internal velocity dispersion estimates 0.15 +/- 0.01 mas/yr, which corresponds to 5.4 +/- 0.4 km/s at a distance of 8.4 kpc. Projecting a simple model for the cluster onto the sky to compare with our proper motion dataset, in conjunction with surface density data, we estimate the total present-day mass of the cluster to be 15,000 (+7400 -6000) Solar masses. The mass in stars observed within a cylinder of radius R=0.4 pc is found to be 9000 (+4000 -3500) Solar Masses at formal 3-sigma confidence. This mass measurement is free from assumptions about the mass function of the cluster, and thus may be used to check mass estimates from photometry and simulation. When we conduct this check, we find that the present-day mass function of the Arches cluster is likely either top-heavy or truncated at low-mass, or both. Collateral benefits of our data and analysis include: 1. cluster membership probabilities, which may be used to extract a clean cluster sample for future photometric work; 2. a refined estimate of the bulk motion of the Arches cluster with respect to the field, which we find to be 172 +/- 15 km/s, which is slightly slower than suggested by previous VLT-Keck measurements; and 3. a velocity dispersion estimate for the field itself, which is likely dominated by the inner galactic bulge and the nuclear disk.
  • Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.
  • Deep Keck/NIRC2 HK'L' observations of the Arches cluster near the Galactic center reveal a significant population of near-infrared excess sources. We combine the L'-band excess observations with K'-band proper motions, to confirm cluster membership of excess sources in a starburst cluster for the first time. The robust removal of field contamination provides a reliable disk fraction down to our completeness limit of H=19 mag, or about 5 Msun at the distance of the Arches. Of the 24 identified sources with K'-L' > 2.0 mag, 21 have reliable proper motion measurements, all of which are proper motion members of the Arches cluster. VLT/SINFONI K'-band spectroscopy of three excess sources reveals strong CO bandhead emission, which we interpret as the signature of dense circumstellar disks. The detection of strong disk emission from the Arches stars is surprising in view of the high mass of the B-type main sequence host stars of the disks and the intense starburst environment. We find a disk fraction of 6 +/- 2% among B-type stars in the Arches cluster. A radial increase in the disk fraction from 3 to 10% suggests rapid disk destruction in the immediate vicinity of numerous O-type stars in the cluster core. A comparison between the Arches and other high- and low-mass star-forming regions provides strong indication that disk depletion is significantly more rapid in compact starburst clusters than in moderate star-forming environments.
  • We present progenitor-star detections, light curves, and optical spectra of SN2009ip and the 2009 optical transient in UGC2773 (U2773-OT), which were not genuine SNe. Precursor variability in the decade before outburst indicates that both of the progenitor stars were LBVs. Their pre-outburst light curves resemble the S Doradus phases that preceded giant eruptions of eta Carinae and SN1954J (V12 in NGC2403), with intermediate progenitor luminosities. HST detections a decade before discovery indicate that the SN2009ip and U2773-OT progenitors were supergiants with likely initial masses of 50-80 Msun and $\ga$20 Msun, respectively. Both outbursts had spectra befitting known LBVs, although in different physical states. SN 2009ip exhibited a hot LBV spectrum with characteristic speeds of 550 km/s, plus faster material up to 5000 km/s, resembling the slow Homunculus and fast blast wave of eta Carinae. U2773-OT shows a forest of narrow absorption and emission lines comparable to that of S Dor in its cool state, plus [CaII] emission and an IR excess indicative of dust, similar to SN2008S and N300-OT. [CaII] emission is probably tied to a dusty pre-outburst environment, and not the outburst mechanism. SN2009ip and U2773-OT may provide a critical link between historical LBV eruptions, while U2773-OT may provide a link between LBVs and SN2008S and N300-OT. Future searches will uncover more examples of precursor LBV variability of this kind, providing key clues that may help unravel the instability driving LBVs.