• The Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) provides wide field-of-view images in 12 narrow, intermediate and broad-band filters optimized for stellar photometry. Here we have applied J-PLUS data for the first time for the study of Galactic GCs using science verification data obtained for the very metal-poor GC M\,15. Our J-PLUS data provide low-resolution spectral energy distributions covering the near-UV to the near-IR, allowing us to search for MPs based on pseudo-spectral fitting diagnostics. J-PLUS CMDs are found to be particularly useful to search for splits in the sequences formed by the upper red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We interpret these split sequences as evidence for the presence of MPs. This demonstrates that the J-PLUS survey will have sufficient spatial coverage and spectral resolution to perform a large statistical study of GCs through multi-band photometry in the coming years.
  • We explore the morphology of galaxies living in the proximity of cosmic voids, using a sample of voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. At all stellar masses, void galaxies exhibit morphologies of a later type than galaxies in a control sample, which represent galaxies in an average density environment. We interpret this trend as a pure environmental effect, independent of the mass bias, due to a slower galaxy build-up in the rarefied regions of voids. We confirm previous findings about a clear segregation in galaxy morphology, with galaxies of a later type being found at smaller void-centric distances with respect to the early-type galaxies. We also show, for the first time, that the radius of the void has an impact on the evolutionary history of the galaxies that live within it or in its surroundings. In fact, an enhanced fraction of late-type galaxies is found in the proximity of voids larger than the median void radius. Likewise, an excess of early-type galaxies is observed within or around voids of a smaller size. A significant difference in galaxy properties in voids of different sizes is observed up to 2 Rvoid, which we define as the region of influence of voids. The significance of this difference is greater than 3sigma for all the volume-complete samples considered here. The fraction of star-forming galaxies shows the same behavior as the late-type galaxies, but no significant difference in stellar mass is observed in the proximity of voids of different sizes.
  • [Abridged] We use the WINGS database to select a sample of 67 nearby galaxy clusters with at least 30 spectroscopic members each. 53 of these clusters do not show evidence of substructures in phase-space, while 14 do. We estimate the virial radii and circular velocities of the 67 clusters by a variety of proxies (velocity dispersion, X-ray temperature, and richness) and use these estimates to build stack samples from these 53 and 14 clusters ('Reg' and 'Irr' stacks, respectively). We determine the number-density and velocity-dispersion profiles (VDPs) of E, S0, and Sp+Irr (S) galaxies in the Reg and Irr samples, separately, and fit models to these profiles. The number density profiles of E, S0, and S galaxies are adequately described by either a NFW or a cored King model, both for the Reg and Irr samples, with a slight preference for the NFW model. The spatial distribution concentration increases from the S to the S0 and to the E populations, both in the Reg and the Irr stacks, reflecting the well-known morphology-radius relation. Reg clusters have a more concentrated spatial distribution of E and S0 galaxies than Irr clusters, while the spatial distributions of S galaxies in Reg and Irr clusters are similar. We propose a new phenomenological model that provides acceptable fits to the VDP of all our galaxy samples. The VDPs become steeper and with a higher normalization from E to S0 to S galaxies. The S0 VDP is close to that of E galaxies in Reg clusters, and intermediate between those of E and S galaxies in Irr clusters. Our results suggest that S galaxies are a recently accreted cluster population, that take less than 3 Gyr to evolve into S0 galaxies after accretion, and in doing so modify their phase-space distribution, approaching that of cluster ellipticals. While in Reg clusters this evolutionary process is mostly completed, it is still ongoing in Irr clusters.
  • The impending Javalambre Physics of the accelerating universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) will be the first wide-field survey of $\gtrsim$ 8500 deg$^2$ to reach the `stage IV' category. Because of the redshift resolution afforded by 54 narrow-band filters, J-PAS is particularly suitable for cluster detection in the range z$<$1. The photometric redshift dispersion is estimated to be only $\sim 0.003$ with few outliers $\lesssim$ 4\% for galaxies brighter than $i\sim23$ AB, because of the sensitivity of narrow band imaging to absorption and emission lines. Here we evaluate the cluster selection function for J-PAS using N-body+semi-analytical realistic mock catalogues. We optimally detect clusters from this simulation with the Bayesian Cluster Finder, and we assess the completeness and purity of cluster detection against the mock data. The minimum halo mass threshold we find for detections of galaxy clusters and groups with both $>$80\% completeness and purity is $M_h \sim 5 \times 10^{13}M_{\odot}$ up to $z\sim 0.7$. We also model the optical observable, $M^*_{\rm CL}$-halo mass relation, finding a non-evolution with redshift and main scatter of $\sigma_{M^*_{\rm CL} | M_{\rm h}}\sim 0.14 \,dex$ down to a factor two lower in mass than other planned broad-band stage IV surveys, at least. For the $M_{\rm h} \sim 1 \times 10^{14}M_{\odot}$ Planck mass limit, J-PAS will arrive up to $z\sim 0.85$ with a $\sigma_{M^*_{\rm CL} | M_{\rm h}}\sim 0.12 \, dex$. Therefore J-PAS will provide the largest sample of clusters and groups up to $z\sim 0.8$ with a mass calibration accuracy comparable to X-ray data.
  • We present a catalogue of 348 galaxy clusters and groups with $0.2<z<1.2$ selected in the 2.78 $deg^2$ ALHAMBRA Survey. The high precision of our photometric redshifts, close to $1\%$, and the wide spread of the seven ALHAMBRA pointings ensure that this catalogue has better mass sensitivity and is less affected by cosmic variance than comparable samples. The detection has been carried out with the Bayesian Cluster Finder (BCF), whose performance has been checked in ALHAMBRA-like light-cone mock catalogues. Great care has been taken to ensure that the observable properties of the mocks photometry accurately correspond to those of real catalogues. From our simulations, we expect to detect galaxy clusters and groups with both $70\%$ completeness and purity down to dark matter halo masses of $M_h\sim3\times10^{13}\rm M_{\odot}$ for $z<0.85$. Cluster redshifts are expected to be recovered with $\sim0.6\%$ precision for $z<1$. We also expect to measure cluster masses with $\sigma_{M_h|M^*_{CL}}\sim0.25-0.35\, dex$ precision down to $\sim3\times10^{13}\rm M_{\odot}$, masses which are $50\%$ smaller than those reached by similar work. We have compared these detections with previous optical, spectroscopic and X-rays work, finding an excellent agreement with the rates reported from the simulations. We have also explored the overall properties of these detections such as the presence of a colour-magnitude relation, the evolution of the photometric blue fraction and the clustering of these sources in the different ALHAMBRA fields. Despite the small numbers, we observe tentative evidence that, for a fixed stellar mass, the environment is playing a crucial role at lower redshifts (z$<$0.5).
  • Aims. We present the B-, V- and K-band surface photometry catalogs obtained running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey having isophotal area larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). Methods. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results. For each galaxy and for each photometric band the GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law best-fitting the luminosity profiles. They are: the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (R:A:; DEC:), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b=a) and a flag parameter (QFLAG) giving a global indication of the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41,463 galaxies in the B-band, 42,275 in the V-band, and 71,687 in the K-band. We find that the bright early-type galaxies have larger Sersic indices and effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general the effective radii increase systematically from the K- to the V- and B-band. Conclusions. The GASPHOT photometry turns out to be in fairly good agreement with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, as well as with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. The main advantages of GASPHOT with respect to other tools are: (i) the automatic finding of the local PSF; (ii) the short CPU time of execution; (iii) the remarkable stability against the choice of the initial guess parameters. All these characteristics make GASPHOT an ideal tool for blind surface photometry of large galaxy samples in wide-field CCD mosaics.
  • Using a sample of cosmic voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we study the star formation activity of void galaxies. The properties of galaxies living in voids are compared with those of galaxies living in the void shells and with a control sample, representing the general galaxy population. Void galaxies appear to form stars more efficiently than shell galaxies and the control sample. This result can not be interpreted as a consequence of the bias towards low masses in underdense regions, as void galaxy subsamples with the same mass distribution as the control sample also show statistically different specific star formation rates. This highlights the fact that galaxy evolution in voids is slower with respect to the evolution of the general population. Nevertheless, when only the star forming galaxies are considered, we find that the star formation rate is insensitive to the environment, as the main sequence is remarkably constant in the three samples under consideration. This fact implies that environmental effects manifest themselves as fast quenching mechanisms, while leaving the non-quenched galaxies almost unaffected, as their star formation activity is largely regulated by the mass of their halo. We also analyse galaxy properties as a function of void-centric distance and find that the enhancement in the star formation activity with respect to the control sample is observable up to a radial distance 1.5 Rvoid. This result can be used as a suitable definition of void shells. Finally, we find that larger voids show an enhanced star formation activity in the shells with respect to their smaller counterparts, that could be related to the different dynamical evolution experienced by voids of different sizes.
  • We present the results of an extended narrow-band H{\alpha} study of the massive galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557 at z = 1.39. This paper represents a follow up study to our previous investigation of star-formation in the cluster centre, extending our analysis out to a projected cluster radius of 1.5 Mpc. Using the Near InfraRed Imager and Spectrograph (NIRI) on Gemini North we obtained deep H narrow-band imaging corresponding to the rest-frame wavelength of H{\alpha} at the cluster's redshift. We identify a total of 163 potential cluster members in both pointings, excluding stars based on their near-IR colours derived from VLT/HAWK-I imaging. Of these 163 objects 14 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, and 20% are excess line-emitters. We find no evidence of star formation activity within a radius of 200 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy in the cluster core. Dust-corrected star formation rates (SFR) of excess emitters outside this cluster quenching radius, RQ \sim 200 kpc, are on average <SFR> = 2.7 \pm 1.0 M\odot yr-1, but do not show evidence of increasing star-formation rates toward the extreme 1.5 Mpc radius of the cluster. No individual cluster galaxy exceeds an SFR of 6 M\odot yr-1 . Massive galaxies (log M\ast /M\odot > 10.75) all have low specific SFRs (SSFRs, i.e. SFR per unit stellar mass). At fixed stellar mass, galaxies in the cluster centre have lower SSFRs than the rest of the cluster galaxies, which in turn have lower SSFRs than field galaxies at the same redshift by a factor of a few to 10. For the first time we can demonstrate through measurements of individual SFRs that already at very early epochs (at an age of the Universe of \sim4.5 Gyr) the suppression of star-formation is an effect of the cluster environment which persists at fixed galaxy stellar mass. [Erratum added after the original paper]
  • Using a large sample of galaxies from the SDSS-DR7, we have analysed the alignment of disk galaxies around cosmic voids. We have constructed a complete sample of cosmic voids (devoid of galaxies brighter than M_r-5 log(h) =-20.17) with radii larger than 10 Mpc/h up to redshift 0.12. Disk galaxies in shells around these voids have been used to look for particular alignments between the angular momentum of the galaxies and the radial direction of the voids. We find that disk galaxies around voids larger than >~ 15 Mpc/h within distances not much larger than 5 Mpc/h from the surface of the voids present a significant tendency to have their angular momenta aligned with the void's radial direction with a significance >~ 98.8% against the null hypothesis. The strength of this alignment is dependent on the void's radius and for voids with ~<15 Mpc/h the distribution of the orientation of the galaxies is compatible with a random distribution. Finally, we find that this trend observed in the alignment of galaxies is similar to the one observed for the minor axis of dark matter halos around cosmic voids found in cosmological simulations, suggesting a possible link in the evolution of both components.
  • We present the first results of a narrow-band photometric study of the massive galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557 at z=1.39. We obtained deep $H$ narrow-band imaging with NIRI on Gemini North, corresponding to H-alpha emission at the cluster's redshift. Our sample consists of 82 galaxies within a radius of ~500 kpc, ten of which are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Sixteen galaxies are identified as excess line-emitters. Among just the excess line-emitting galaxies we find an average SFR of 3.6 +/- 1.3 Msun/yr. For spectroscopically confirmed cluster members we find a correlation between H broad-band magnitude and SFR such that brighter galaxies have lower SFRs. The probability that SFR and magnitude of confirmed members are uncorrelated is 0.7%. We also find a correlation between SFR and distance from the cluster centre for both confirmed and excess line-emitting candidate members, with a probability of 5% for there to be no correlation among confirmed members. All excess line-emitting candidate cluster members are located outside a radius of 200 kpc. We conclude that star formation is effectively shut off within the central 200 kpc radius (R_QUENCH ~ 200 kpc) of this massive galaxy cluster at z=1.39, when the universe was only 4.5 Gyr old.
  • We present a study characterizing the environments of galaxies in the redshift range of 0.4 < z < 1 based on data from the POWIR near infrared imaging and DEEP2 spectroscopic redshift surveys, down to a stellar mass of log M* = 10.25 M_sun. Galaxy environments are measured in terms of nearest neighbour densities as well as fixed aperture densities and kinematical and dynamical parameters of neighbour galaxies within a radius of 1 Mpc. We disentangle the correlations between galaxy stellar mass, galaxy colour and galaxy environment, using not only galaxy number densities, but also other environmental characteristics such as velocity dispersion, mean harmonic radius, and crossing time. We find that galaxy colour and the fraction of blue galaxies depends very strongly on stellar mass at 0.4 < z < 1, while a weak additional dependence on local number densities is in place at lower redshifts (0.4 < z < 0.7). This environmental influence is most visible in the colours of intermediate mass galaxies (10.5 < log M* < 11), whereas colours of lower and higher mass galaxies remain largely unchanged with redshift and environment. At a fixed stellar mass, the colour-density relation almost disappears, while the colour-stellar mass relation is present at all local densities. We find a weak correlation between stellar mass and environment at intermediate redshifts, which contributes to the overall colour-density relation. We furthermore do not find a significant correlation between galaxy colour and virial mass, i.e., parent dark matter halo mass. Galaxy stellar mass thus appears to be the crucial defining parameter for intrinsic galaxy properties such as ongoing star formation and colour.
  • We show that, observationally, the projected local density distribution in high-z clusters is shifted towards higher values compared to clusters at lower redshift. To search for the origin of this evolution, we analyze a sample of haloes selected from the Millennium Simulation and populated using semi-analytic models, investigating the relation between observed projected density and physical 3D density, using densities computed from the 10 and 3 closest neighbours. Both observationally and in the simulations, we study the relation between number of cluster members and cluster mass, and number of members per unit of cluster mass. We find that the observed evolution of projected densities reflects a shift to higher values of the physical 3D density distribution. In turn, this must be related with the globally higher number of galaxies per unit of cluster volume N/V in the past. We show that the evolution of N/V is due to a combination of two effects: a) distant clusters were denser in dark matter (DM) simply because the DM density within R_{200} (~the cluster virial radius) is defined to be a fixed multiple of the critical density of the Universe, and b) the number of galaxies per unit of cluster DM mass is remarkably constant both with redshift and cluster mass if counting galaxies brighter than a passively evolving magnitude limit. Our results highlight that distant clusters were much denser environments than today's clusters, both in galaxy number and mass, and that the density conditions felt by galaxies in virialized systems do not depend on the system mass.
  • The ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS, P.I. Simon D.M. White, LP 166.A-0162) is an ESO large programme aimed at studying clusters and cluster galaxies at z=0.4-1. How different is the evolution of the star formation activity in clusters, in groups and in the field? Does it depend on cluster mass and/or the local galaxy density? How relevant are starburst and post-starburst galaxies in the different environments? Is there an evolution in the galaxies' structures, and if so, is this related to the changes in their star formation activity? These are some of the main questions that have been investigated using the EDisCS dataset.
  • We quantify the evolution of the spiral, S0 and elliptical fractions in galaxy clusters as a function of cluster velocity dispersion ($\sigma$) and X-ray luminosity ($L_X$) using a new database of 72 nearby clusters from the WIde-Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) combined with literature data at $z=0.5-1.2$. Most WINGS clusters have $\sigma$ between 500 and 1100 $\rm km s^{-1}$, and $L_X$ between 0.2 and $5 \times 10^{44} \rm erg/s$. The S0 fraction in clusters is known to increase with time at the expense of the spiral population. We find that the spiral and S0 fractions have evolved more strongly in lower $\sigma$, less massive clusters, while we confirm that the proportion of ellipticals has remained unchanged. Our results demonstrate that morphological evolution since $z=1$ is not confined to massive clusters, but is actually more pronounced in low mass clusters, and therefore must originate either from secular (intrinsic) evolution and/or from environmental mechanisms that act preferentially in low-mass environments, or both in low- and high-mass systems. We also find that the evolution of the spiral fraction perfectly mirrors the evolution of the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, at low-z the spiral fraction anticorrelates with $L_X$. Conversely, no correlation is observed with $\sigma$. Given that both $\sigma$ and $L_X$ are tracers of the cluster mass, these results pose a challenge for current scenarios of morphological evolution in clusters.
  • Post-starburst (E+A or k+a) spectra, characterized by their exceptionally strong Balmer lines in absorption and the lack of emission lines, belong to galaxies in which the star formation activity ended abruptly sometime during the past Gyr. We perform a spectral analysis of galaxies in clusters, groups, poor groups and the field at z=0.4-0.8 based on the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. The incidence of k+a's at these redshifts depends strongly on environment. K+a's reside preferentially in clusters and, unexpectedly, in a subset of the sigma = 200-400 km/s groups, those that have a low fraction of [OII] emitters. In these environments, 20-30% of the recently star-forming galaxies have had their star formation activity recently truncated. In contrast, there are proportionally fewer k+a's in the field, the poor groups and groups with a high [OII] fraction. The incidence of k+a galaxies correlates with the cluster velocity dispersion: more massive clusters have higher proportions of k+a's. Spectra of dusty starburst candidates, with strong Balmer absorption and emission lines, present a very different environmental dependence from k+a's. They are numerous in all environments at z=0.4-0.8, but they are especially numerous in all types of groups, favoring the hypothesis of triggering by a merger. Our observations are consistent with previous suggestions that cluster k+a galaxies are observed in a transition phase as massive S0 and Sa galaxies, evolving from star-forming later types to passively evolving early-type galaxies. The correlation between k+a fraction and cluster sigma supports the hypothesis that k+a galaxies in clusters originate from processes related to the intracluster medium, while several possibilities are discussed for the origin of the k+a frequency in low-[OII] groups.(abr.)
  • We investigate how the [OII] properties and the morphologies of galaxies in clusters and groups at z=0.4-0.8 depend on projected local galaxy density, and compare with the field at similar redshifts and clusters at low-z. In both nearby and distant clusters, higher-density regions contain proportionally fewer star-forming galaxies, and the average [OII] equivalent width of star-forming galaxies is independent of local density. However, in distant clusters the average current star formation rate (SFR) in star-forming galaxies seems to peak at densities ~15-40 galaxies Mpc^{-2}. At odds with low-z results, at high-z the relation between star-forming fraction and local density varies from high- to low-mass clusters. Overall, our results suggest that at high-z the current star formation (SF) activity in star-forming galaxies does not depend strongly on global or local environment, though the possible SFR peak seems at odds with this conclusion. We find that the cluster SFR normalized by cluster mass anticorrelates with mass and correlates with the star-forming fraction. These trends can be understood given a) that the average star-forming galaxy forms about 1 Msun/yr in all clusters; b) that the total number of galaxies scales with cluster mass and c) the dependence of star-forming fraction on cluster mass. We present the morphology-density (MD) relation for our z=0.4-0.8 clusters, and uncover that the decline of the spiral fraction with density is entirely driven by galaxies of types Sc or later. For galaxies of a given Hubble type, we see no evidence that SF properties depend on local environment. In contrast with recent findings at low-z, in our distant clusters the SF-density relation and the MD-relation are equivalent, suggesting that neither of the two is more fundamental than the other.(abr.)