• Because they may provide ultrathin, high-flux, and energy-efficient membranes for precise ionic and molecular sieving in aqueous solution, GO membranes (partially oxidized, stacked sheets of graphene) have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, proton conductors, lithium-based batteries and super-capacitors. Unlike carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes, in which the nanotube pores have fixed sizes, the pores of GO membranes - the interlayer spacing between GO sheets - are of variable size. This presents a challenge for using GO membranes for filtration. Despite the great efforts to tune and fix the interlayer spacing, it remains difficult both to reduce the interlayer spacing sufficiently to exclude small ions while keeping this separation constant against the tendency of GO membranes to swell when immersed in aqueous solution, which greatly affects the applications of GO membranes. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that highly efficient and selective ion rejection by GO membranes can be readily achieved by controlling the interlayer spacing of GO membranes using cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Li+ and Mg2+) themselves. The interspacing can be controlled with precision as small as 1 A, and GO membranes controlled by one kind of cation can exclude other cations with a larger hydrated volume, which can only be accommodated with a larger interlayer spacing. First-principles calculations reveal that the strong noncovalent cation-pi interactions between hydrated cations in solution and aromatic ring structures in GO are the cause of this unexpected behavior. These findings open up new avenues for using GO membranes for water desalination and purification, lithium-based batteries and super-capacitors, molecular sieves for separating ions or molecules, and many other applications.
  • We construct a converging geometric iterated function system on the moduli space of ordered triangles, for which the involved functions have geometric meanings and contain a non-contraction map under the natural metric.
  • A quadrisecant of a knot is a straight line intersecting the knot at four points. If a knot has finitely many quadrisecants, one can replace each subarc between two adjacent secant points by the line segment between them to get the quadrisecant approximation of the original knot. It was conjectured that the quadrisecant approximation is always a knot with the same knot type as the original knot. We show that every knot type contains two knots, the quadrisecant approximation of one knot has self intersections while the quadrisecant approximation of the other knot is a knot with different knot type.
  • We give characterizations of the skein polynomial for links (as well as Jones and Alexander-Conway polynomials derivable from it), avoiding the usual "smoothing of a crossing" move. As by-products we have characterizations of these polynomials for knots, and for links with any given number of components.
  • In this paper, the support genus of all Legendrian right handed trefoil knots and some other Legendrian knots is computed. We give examples of Legendrian knots in the three-sphere with the standard contact structure which have positive support genus with arbitrarily negative Thurston-Benniquin invariant. This answers a question in Onaran.
  • In this paper, we prove that there are no truly cosmetic surgeries on genus one classical knots. If the two surgery slopes have the same sign, we give the only possibilities of reflectively cosmetic surgeries. The result is an application of Heegaard Floer theory and number theory.
  • In this paper, we give an algorithm to compute the hat version of the Heegaard Floer homology of a closed oriented three-manifold. This method also allows us to compute the filtrations coming from a null-homologous link in a three-manifold.
  • In a previous paper, Sarkar and the third author gave a combinatorial description of the hat version of Heegaard Floer homology for three-manifolds. Given a cobordism between two connected three-manifolds, there is an induced map between their Heegaard Floer homologies. Assume that the first homology group of each boundary component surjects onto the first homology group of the cobordism (modulo torsion). Under this assumption, we present a procedure for finding the rank of the induced Heegaard Floer map combinatorially, in the hat version.