• It has been a great challenge to achieve the direct light manipulation of matter on a bulk scale. In this work, the direct light propulsion of matter was observed on a macroscopic scale for the first time using a bulk graphene based material. The unique structure and properties of graphene and the morphology of the bulk graphene material make it capable of not only absorbing light at various wavelengths but also emitting energetic electrons efficiently enough to drive the bulk material following Newtonian mechanics. Thus, the unique photonic and electronic properties of individual graphene sheets are manifested in the response of the bulk state. These results offer an exciting opportunity to bring about bulk scale light manipulation with the potential to realize long-sought proposals in areas such as the solar sail and space transportation driven directly by sunlight.
  • Graphene is an emerging class of two-dimensional (2D) material with unique electrical properties and a wide range of potential practical applications. In addition, graphene hybrid structures combined with other 2D materials, metal microstructures, silicon photonic crystal cavities, and waveguides have more extensive applications in van der Waals heterostructures, hybrid graphene plasmonics, hybrid optoelectronic devices, and optical modulators. Based on well-developed transfer methods, graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently used in most of the graphene hybrid applications. Although mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite provides the highest-quality graphene, the transfer of the desired microcleaving graphene (MG) to the structure at a specific position is a critical challenge, that limits the combination of MG with other structures. Herein, we report a new technique for the selective transfer of MG patterns and devices onto chosen targets using a bilayer-polymer structure and femtosecond laser microfabrication. This selective transfer technique, which exactly transfers the patterned graphene onto a chosen target, leaving the other flakes on the original substrate, provides an efficient route for the fabrication of MG-based microdevices. This method will facilitate the preparation of van der Waals heterostructures and enable the optimization of the performance of graphene hybrid devices.
  • Femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy using 400 nm-pump and 800 nm-probe in CVD-grown multilayer graphene provides strong evidence for isotropic distribution of photoexcited carrier after initial relaxation. Indicative of such isotropic distribution is a pump polarization independence of differential reflectivity (\DeltaR/R) and transmittance (\DeltaT/T) from pump-probe measurements. Combined with results using 800 nm-pump in [arXiv. 1301.1743v3 (2013)], these pump polarization dependences of time-resolved spectroscopy corroborates the evolution of photo-excited carrier distribution from anisotropic to isotropic with carrier relaxation. And, the absorbance of graphene is identical for in-plane and out-of-plane optical fields. No matter the carrier distribution in momentum space, the influence of carrier on in-plane and out-of-plane optical fields from state filling effect is identical. The sign reversing of ps dynamics signal in graphene/graphite should not directly relate to carrier.
  • Polarization characteristic of ultrafast carrier dynamics in multi-layer CVD-grown graphene is probed with tilted beams (with respected to the graphene plane). The graphene ultrafast carrier dynamics measurement greatly depends on both polarization (i.e., orientation of linear polarization) and wave vector of probe beam. The differential reflectivity \Delta R=R signal of picosecond dynamics could be continuously altered from positive to negative by changing the probe polarization from P to S when the dynamics is probed by a total internal reflected beam. The polarization dependent \Delta R=R signal around 0 delay time is positive. It could be altered to negative by changing the probe polarization if the probe beam is non-total internal reflected beam. However, no sign reversal was observed for differential transmittance \Delta T=T . These extremely unexpected results indicate the anisotropy of graphene carrier dynamics. Thus the ultrafast carrier dynamics should be further studied with consideration of the anisotropic structure (in- and out-of-graphene plane) of graphene.