• Person Re-IDentification (Re-ID) aims to match person images captured from two non-overlapping cameras. In this paper, a deep hybrid similarity learning (DHSL) method for person Re-ID based on a convolution neural network (CNN) is proposed. In our approach, a CNN learning feature pair for the input image pair is simultaneously extracted. Then, both the element-wise absolute difference and multiplication of the CNN learning feature pair are calculated. Finally, a hybrid similarity function is designed to measure the similarity between the feature pair, which is realized by learning a group of weight coefficients to project the element-wise absolute difference and multiplication into a similarity score. Consequently, the proposed DHSL method is able to reasonably assign parameters of feature learning and metric learning in a CNN so that the performance of person Re-ID is improved. Experiments on three challenging person Re-ID databases, QMUL GRID, VIPeR and CUHK03, illustrate that the proposed DHSL method is superior to multiple state-of-the-art person Re-ID methods.
  • Person re-identification is becoming a hot research for developing both machine learning algorithms and video surveillance applications. The task of person re-identification is to determine which person in a gallery has the same identity to a probe image. This task basically assumes that the subject of the probe image belongs to the gallery, that is, the gallery contains this person. However, in practical applications such as searching a suspect in a video, this assumption is usually not true. In this paper, we consider the open-set person re-identification problem, which includes two sub-tasks, detection and identification. The detection sub-task is to determine the presence of the probe subject in the gallery, and the identification sub-task is to determine which person in the gallery has the same identity as the accepted probe. We present a database collected from a video surveillance setting of 6 cameras, with 200 persons and 7,413 images segmented. Based on this database, we develop a benchmark protocol for evaluating the performance under the open-set person re-identification scenario. Several popular metric learning algorithms for person re-identification have been evaluated as baselines. From the baseline performance, we observe that the open-set person re-identification problem is still largely unresolved, thus further attention and effort is needed.